Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    What's Ostensive Definition? Not familiar with that term!
    Its just got a fancy name, its just confirming an object so it might be:

    child: bottle,
    parent: yes thats the bottle

    or

    child: cat

    parent: yes that a dog, (bit of over generalisation in that one,) It just sounds good as a techinical term
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Oooh right! so, if in the transcript I see a parent confirming something - can I say

    "that is an example of Ostensive Definition as the parent is reinforcing the child so that it knows the noun used is the correct noun to use in this context"

    Or have i got the idea of it wrong?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm with everyone who says they haven't an idea for language change. All I can remember us doing is reviewing the differences in written texts from an old and modern text, and picking out things like seemingly random placement of capitals on words that aren't nouns, 'e's on the end of words and 's' being spelt as 'f' - but so what? I haven't got a clue what points to home in on.

    For linguists I'm trying to remember Halliday, Dore, Piaget, Aitchison (labelling, packaging and networking) and Kuhl, being the ones we learnt about in class. Reading through hand outs now a lot of what I didn't used to understand is becoming clear, I guess being out of school and relaxed helps me better understand the topics. Too bad the exam's tomorrow morning!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What sort of questions can they ask tomorrow? What I mean is, will they ask questions where you have to analyses a transcript or children’s writing or other areas? (What are the areas?!) I'm really confused.

    I've done some revision on language acquisition - I know Halliday's and Dore's Taxonomy, the nature-nurture debate (Chomsky and Skinner), Spirf-Warf Hypothesis and Vygoski, and stages of development (like holophrastic and telegraphic stages). What else do I need to learn? I'm really stressing out, trying to organise my Mum's party as well as revise - it's a nightmare! I still have to look at Language Change, too. *Cries*. Oh well, I only have myself to blame for not organising my revision properly...

    Anyway - to anyone who replies - thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rachaelmarie)
    Don't go all out on Critical Period because its not a proven thing, your theorist is good but there have been examples which appear to disprove it.
    To be fair, that is true for all linguistic theories - thus their definition as theory rather than fact.

    I'd say it's much more important to stress the need to use tentative language.
    E.g.
    Piaget suggests...
    Crystal's hypothesis implies...
    Numerous theorists have speculated that...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello does anyone know what ages the following stages occur:

    Holoprhastic

    Pivot Open Grammar

    Telegraphic

    As i would like to say - they are in the " " stage which usually occurs at age - years
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Holophrastic - 6 months - 1 year
    Telegraphic - 18 months - 2 years

    I don't know about the other one, don't think we covered it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Approximatly:

    Holophrastic = 12 to 18 months

    Telegraphic = 2 years onwards
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ok thank you

    Tho i am still really confused by these stages - I have in depth notes on holophrastic - but nothing on telegraphic.

    Does anyone have a small outline of telegraphic speech features they could copy and paste?

    It would help me a lot
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Buffyphil)
    Ok thank you

    Tho i am still really confused by these stages - I have in depth notes on holophrastic - but nothing on telegraphic.

    Does anyone have a small outline of telegraphic speech features they could copy and paste?

    It would help me a lot
    Telegraphic is basically the stage where youngsters have moved on from the two word stage (after holophrastic), and are starting to form basic sentences. The term usually applies to 3 or 4 words (like a telegram) used to convey meanings. They tend to be content words like nouns and adjectives rather than function words like verbs and prepositions. Examples: "me want that", "i show book"
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks a lot thats really helped
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    For acquisition, there will be two questions covering two of three possible areas: speech acquisition, learning to read and learning to write [I think]. If they are mean enough to cover reading and writing and not include speech acquisition I will not be a happy bunny.

    For change there are two questions - I think one covers historical change over time and one covers contemporary change.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Could someone please clarify Vygotsky's studies for me??

    Thanks for the Ostensive Definition thingy!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have notes on Vygotsky's internalisation- which related to a past text, involving a child's pre-sleep monologues? So speech that isn't intended for a particular audience, but the child is fixing patterns and shapes in speech? Or something along those lines?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mishael)
    For acquisition, there will be two questions covering two of three possible areas: speech acquisition, learning to read and learning to write [I think]. If they are mean enough to cover reading and writing and not include speech acquisition I will not be a happy bunny.
    We got a writing question in January and nobody had a clue what to do with it.
    Hoping to get reading and speech - I dont have any theorists for reading, but i find the question easier to handle
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by utu7)
    Telegraphic is basically the stage where youngsters have moved on from the two word stage (after holophrastic), and are starting to form basic sentences. The term usually applies to 3 or 4 words (like a telegram) used to convey meanings. They tend to be content words like nouns and adjectives rather than function words like verbs and prepositions. Examples: "me want that", "i show book"
    So holophrastic is? and what's after telegraphic?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by erk)
    So holophrastic is? and what's after telegraphic?
    Holophrastic = single word to express meaning, usually accompanied by gestures and facial expressions, i.e. "milk!", meaning "I want some milk".

    Two-word stage = starts to use two words which are linked together to create meaning. For example, "baby bed, "where mummy", "comb hair". Signals the beginning of grammar. I'm revising this now and finding that Cruttenden's labelling theories work well with this stage.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Holophrastic is the first stage - when children move from babbling to speaking full words (from the ages of 9-18 months usually). In this stage children have a vocabulary of up to 50 'holophrases' - single words used to express meaning. These are often not recognisable as adult words.

    The two word stage is next, from about 18 months to 2 years. Its basically where the child starts to use two words at a time. This is where grammar first starts to emerge -the child starts to use possessives and pronouns 'my book'.

    Then from 2 years onwards is the telegraphic stage.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Umm isn't telegraphic after the two-word point.. so what's after telegraph? (3)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by erk)
    Umm isn't telegraphic after the two-word point.. so what's after telegraph? (3)
    There is no definable stage after telegraphic. The language just gets less and less telegraphic, children start to use more and more non lexical language and pragmatic awareness develops.

    In transcripts of 3 and 4 year olds there's still generally some telegraphic language.
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

1,983

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  2. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. Bishop Grosseteste University
    All Courses Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.