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    I have been offered a place to read economics at the university of nottingham and very excited at the prospect.
    When i went to cambridge for an open day, i was told by a student that the colleges are against this, but then again money is literally thrown at you at oxbridge (apparently so).
    But hey we don't all get accepted so there is a greater chance that i'll end up in nottingham.
    Can anyone with experience comment on what it's like to hold a part-time job while studying at university, especially as workloads get heavier in subsequent years.

    btw..you think it's be wise to raise this question with the admissions tutor at cambridge next week.
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    I wouldn't give him the impression you'd need a job whilst there.
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    (Original post by theECONOMIST)
    I have been offered a place to read economics at the university of nottingham and very excited at the prospect.
    When i went to cambridge for an open day, i was told by a student that the colleges are against this, but then again money is literally thrown at you at oxbridge (apparently so).
    But hey we don't all get accepted so there is a greater chance that i'll end up in nottingham.
    Can anyone with experience comment on what it's like to hold a part-time job while studying at university, especially as workloads get heavier in subsequent years.

    btw..you think it's be wise to raise this question with the admissions tutor at cambridge next week.
    No don't raise the question with admissions tutors; it is absolutely impossible to work part-time at Oxbridge as there is just too much work. Also, its not true that money is thrown at you; the funding system is just the same as at any university unless you happen to go to a really rich college which gives out loads of scholarships. Even the subsidised rents are being eroded. However, because oxbridge terms are so short (8 weeks) it is possible to earn a fair amount of money during the vacations.

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    No, don't raise this with the admissions tutors.

    As for Nottingham, I'm a medic so a part time job would be totally impractical. However, the work load for economists didn't seem to be extremely high in 1st year (which doesn't count except for medics) so if you manage your time well, I see no reason why couldn't work a few hours a week.

    You'll have exams in Jan and after Easter, so I chose not to work over these holidays. The summer is long though, and 'work free'.
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    (Original post by hildabeast)
    No don't raise the question with admissions tutors; it is absolutely impossible to work part-time at Oxbridge as there is just too much work. Also, its not true that money is thrown at you; the funding system is just the same as at any university unless you happen to go to a really rich college which gives out loads of scholarships. Even the subsidised rents are being eroded. However, because oxbridge terms are so short (8 weeks) it is possible to earn a fair amount of money during the vacations.

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    Again, don't even mention it with your tutors! They're looking for someone fully committed to studies.

    However I don't agree that it's "absolutely impossible" to do a job and your degree here, if I cut out all my non-paid activities it'd amount to more than 25 hours a week. According to Guardian 19% of students here have jobs during termtime, but many must do so without tutor's knowledge, as many would not allow you to do it, and if your work goes downhill they'll instantly blame it on your job.

    I advise anyone going to university to do paid employment over the summer after your A Levels - you can easily earn at least £2000, add a student loan to that and you shouldn't be complaining about money worries.
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    It's aboslutely impossible for me though Jools... I have perhaps 26 to 29 hours of timetabled lectures a week (well did have in years 1 + 2) so am in medschool 9-5 or 6 everyday, and then have a lot to do outside of that. (Just in case potential Notts medics were wondering)

    I have a lot of sympathy for students struggling to make ends meet. Doing a degree later in life meant that occasionally I was able to get employment through contacts at £400 a day in order to rebuild my bank balance. Some fellow students were working part-time over 15 hours a week for £75. It took them 80 hours of effort to equal my 7 hours of toil.

    If only all students could raise large sums of much needed extra revenue from just a few days work each term so that study time is not seriously eroded. My own particular source of income was from the installation and maintainance of financial systems. I did hear of a few students making good money from modelling and similar activities that took very little of their time but that is not a viable solution for everyone and raises matters of conscience and propriety.

    Parents are probably still the best source of emergency funding for many individuals but there is often a practical ceiling to help from that quarter and there is the question of independence too. If income can be generated from coursework and associated projects, as in my own case, there is an added bonus. It may be worth doing some voluntary work in your chosen field during holidays and weekends to build up contacts. I still do that now when I am trying to break into new areas.
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    (Original post by sheenpaul)
    I have a lot of sympathy for students struggling to make ends meet.
    In a lot of cases I really don't...

    Firstly if you're from a 'poor' family you won't have to pay a penny in tuition fees, and your loan will be about £4000 a year (more outside London), which for much of the country can comfortably provide you with accommodation, food and everything you need. And you shouldn't moan that it'll mean starting off with £12,000 or so of 'debt', as you only have to pay this off in small amounts - 9% of your salary - once you're earning over £15,000.

    If students envisage financial problems, then why not get a job during the vacation? OK for many, especially medics as was highlighted, it's difficult to do it during termtime.

    But between the end of your A-Level exams and the start of uni = about 12 weeks. You can easily earn £2000+ during this time.

    Sorry, but the same people I know who complain about not having any money are the same ones who boast about spending £30-40 getting pissed in a night, and doss around during the holidays.
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    i work at my local asda (woohoo i know), but its kinda fun, and i figure which ever uni i go to in september, i can get a transfer to a local one there. plus, the discount means i can get cheap food.....rahahahaha

    theyre actually quite understanding about students and would even offer to keep me on, even if i would only be working in the summer holidays...which is kind of them
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    I do leaflets for my dads company, the pay is crap but I work for myself so I just work when I want to.

    I also run a very part time ebay business which I have stopped as I haven#t managed to buy any new stock due to the christmas rush.
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    (Original post by Jools)

    If students envisage financial problems, then why not get a job during the vacation? OK for many, especially medics as was highlighted, it's difficult to do it during termtime.
    Not as easy as it sounds - depends entirely on the area in which you live. I, like my friends both coming back from uni or looking for employment after leaving school, have found that nowhere is hiring on either a permanent or temporary basis.

    Student loan - £4000 and fees paid is just about enough to live on if you operate a tight budget. Where the means testing really hits is with people just over the threshold - in practice, many parents earning just over the cut-off point really struggle to pay fees and top up a £3000 to an amount that can be lived on. And the worst thing is that people whose parents are on hundreds of thousands are entitled to the exact same loan and can just pop it in a high interest account for three or four years and have a nice lump sum at the end
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    And the worst thing is that people whose parents are on hundreds of thousands are entitled to the exact same loan and can just pop it in a high interest account for three or four years and have a nice lump sum at the end
    Just because their parents have a lot of money, it doesn't mean they'll get it.

    Of the five of us in my flat, my parents earn the most and I get the least allowance from them. The government seems to assume that my parents will be more generous - they have the potential to be, but they don't act on it. My flatmates also have most of their tuition fees paid for (my parents weren't going to pay until I explained that I couldn't go to university unless they paid - the money I'd saved up from working and the loan wouldn't cover accommodation and tuition fees). All of my flatmates get a larger loan than me. Three of my flat mates had their accommodation paid for them by their parents, whereas I had to pay for my own.

    Not meaning to whinge, just wanted to say that it's unfair to suggest that children of rich parents should be given less loan. After all, it is only a loan and not a grant. No matter how much money the parents own, their child's student loan will be paid back just the same as anyone else's.
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    (Original post by .NK)
    Just because their parents have a lot of money, it doesn't mean they'll get it.

    Of the five of us in my flat, my parents earn the most and I get the least allowance from them. The government seems to assume that my parents will be more generous - they have the potential to be, but they don't act on it. My flatmates also have most of their tuition fees paid for (my parents weren't going to pay until I explained that I couldn't go to university unless they paid - the money I'd saved up from working and the loan wouldn't cover accommodation and tuition fees). All of my flatmates get a larger loan than me. Three of my flat mates had their accommodation paid for them by their parents, whereas I had to pay for my own.

    Not meaning to whinge, just wanted to say that it's unfair to suggest that children of rich parents should be given less loan. After all, it is only a loan and not a grant. No matter how much money the parents own, their child's student loan will be paid back just the same as anyone else's.
    Fair enough. It just winds me up that there are people at college whose parents give them an endless supply of money, access to a 'family' credit card etc etc... and seem surprised that not everyone can make their loan cheque go quite as far. lmao I nearly died when we were chatting about student finances and I said I was in overdraft already - the incredulous looks of disgust that clearly suggested I wasn't budgeting properly! Had to point out thaty actually after fees and accomodation I was into negative numbers already...
 
 
 
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