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    On that list? Plato. No question about it.

    Sure he had a couple wacky ideas, but nearly all philosophers have at least a couple. His dialogues, chronicling Socrates' debunking of sophistry, are some of the most powerful affirmations of truth and justice (and condemnation of "might makes right") ever written.
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    I'm surprised no one has voted for Marx yet, thoguh i'm also surprised that people voted for Plato and a conservative member voted for Keynes!!
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    I'm surprised no one has voted for Marx yet, thoguh i'm also surprised that people voted for Plato and a conservative member voted for Keynes!!
    It was a toss up between Marx and Plato, but Marx is Marx, so I went for Plato
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    I'm surprised no one has voted for Marx yet, thoguh i'm also surprised that people voted for Plato and a conservative member voted for Keynes!!
    Heh ... sorry I was sort of half joking

    I should have taken it more seriously ...

    Plato ... absolute lunacy... dictatorship
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    (Original post by zaf1986)
    It was a toss up between Marx and Plato, but Marx is Marx, so I went for Plato
    A totalitarian is a totalitarian. Have you read Karl Poppers 'the open society'.
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    A totalitarian is a totalitarian. Have you read Karl Poppers 'the open society'.
    nope...
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    (Original post by zaf1986)
    nope...
    i suggest you do and quick
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    i suggest you do and quick
    LOL

    I'll think about it once my exams are over, and if I get the time. Knowing you, its probably a waste of time.
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    (Original post by zaf1986)
    LOL

    I'll think about it once my exams are over, and if I get the time. Knowing you, its probably a waste of time.

    Knowing you its probably a waste of a good book on you.
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    In this forum people give their views on almost eveything, but given the lack of people saying who their favourite thinker is it makes me wonder how well-informed people are on the basics of the views. Watching Question Time is good but it does not give you a moral grounding.
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    In this forum people give their views on almost eveything, but given the lack of people saying who their favourite thinker is it makes me wonder how well-informed people are on the basics of the views. Watching Question Time is good but it does not give you a moral grounding.
    I dont think you need to read philosophy of other people in order to create your own view on morality.

    KNowledge of the views of others, though useful, is not the same as factual knowledge of a matter.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    I dont think you need to read philosophy of other people in order to create your own view on morality.

    KNowledge of the views of others, though useful, is not the same as factual knowledge of a matter.
    Its not so much factual knowledge rather its knowing how to interpret it. Today too many people base what they believe to be right on what their emotions tell them or how much they like the person advocating a view.
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    (Original post by objectivism)
    Its not so much factual knowledge rather its knowing how to interpret it. Today too many people base what they believe to be right on what their emotions tell them or how much they like the person advocating a view.
    Very true.

    Though I am familiar with some philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Satre, Kant, Mill, Bentham, and a few more... I am certianly not an expert.

    However I still try to avoid emotive reactions to issues, and ad hominem attacks.

    I do agree that that is lacking on this forum, and indeed in society though.
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    Roger Scruton.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Roger Scruton.
    A conservative, not not my kind, seems to detest modern ways.

    Why did you vote for Plato? He supported totalitarianism
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    (Original post by inequality)
    I understand that type of selfishness. It's what happens throughout nature, and may appear to be the natural and harmonious way to live. I just disagree with it. Maybe I'm unnatural.
    No, you just have enough self restraint and controll to totally accoustom to human nature - I mean we can't all be cavemen can we?
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    (Original post by The Basilisk)
    No, you just have enough self restraint and controll to totally accoustom to human nature - I mean we can't all be cavemen can we?

    I think socialism has more in common with cave men as today with capitalism people can afford to be individuals, in the past i.e. hunter gatherer societies they had to live together i.e form a collective, something socialism supports.
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    (Original post by Iz the Wiz)
    On that list? Plato. No question about it.

    Sure he had a couple wacky ideas, but nearly all philosophers have at least a couple. His dialogues, chronicling Socrates' debunking of sophistry, are some of the most powerful affirmations of truth and justice (and condemnation of "might makes right") ever written.
    Wacky? Yeah I suppose bringing up children in a nunnery and keeping them from the outside world falls into that catorgry, but it would have been quite effective. A child's mind is easily corrupted by society.
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    (Original post by The Basilisk)
    Wacky? Yeah I suppose bringing up children in a nunnery and keeping them from the outside world falls into that catorgry, but it would have been quite effective. A child's mind is easily corrupted by society.

    Society is advanced (and so all of us) by being open to different ideas. It is through conflict that society progresses.
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    Well all thinkers have at least one vote except one - poor Murray Rothbard. Is no one going to bother with the anarcho-capitalist??
 
 
 
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