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    Hi, I'm frantically trying to decide what I want to study at university. Until recently I thought I wanted to do Anthropology, then decided economics was the way to go, then languages ... Anyway, I saw the Human Sciences course on the Oxford website and it looks really interesting. The books on the reading list looked like books I would really enjoy reading, which is a good sign!

    Could some kind person give me their impressions of the course - any info would be good. Specifically, do you know if it's essay-based or more sciency? Are there practicals?
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    Heya, I don't do HumSci but some of my friends do so I'll tell you what I know. They seem to do quite alot of everything. The work is mostly essay based, but they do do some practicals, something to do with flys i seem to recal ???...
    From what I gather they have done some anthropology, genetics stuff, sociological stuff, stuff about demographics, ummm.... not sure what else... it seems to be a course totally about all aspects of humans... the science of humans some may say... anyway... dunno if that helps at all... i really don't know much about it at all
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    I was told by someone who knows what theyre talking about that it's really really interesting but you become quite good at a lot of things instead of very good at a few, don't let that put you off though, i think it looks like a great course!
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    I sent this as a PM a few weeks ago (yet to get a response) but thought I'd post it here as well just in case others might find it useful! :-)

    I graduated in Human Sciences last year from New College, so I am sure I can help answer any questions that you might have!

    To answer your specific question: it is heavily essay based in the core papers in the second and third years. There is a genetics practical involving fruit flies in the first year and there's also a couple of physiology practicals (things like learning how to attach heart monitors and looking at sinus waves and so on). There also some optional papers in which you can do practicals as well in the third year, notably I think the epideimiology style paper.

    These were the final papers I took: (to give you an idea):

    Core:
    1. Behaviour and its evolution, animal and human
    2. Human genetics and evolution
    3. Human ecology
    4. Demography and population
    5b. Sociological theory (I chose sociology but you can do social anthropology)

    Optional:
    Urban and social geography
    Language

    Dissertation:
    Synaesthesia: The Development of Language and Expression

    If you have any other questions please feel free to ask! Its probably better than me rambling on!

    Oh, and here is the Human Sciences website if you haven't already seen it. It has some very useful info:
    http://www.human-sciences.ox.ac.uk/index.htm
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    (Original post by Catt)
    Dissertation:
    Synaesthesia: The Development of Language and Expression
    Hey! sorry if this is a bit OT but I did a dissertation/project on synaesthesia and language evolution too! what was your dissertation about specifically??!
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    Is it true for Human Sciences you can take an option for finals where you build a human ala Dr. Frankenstein?
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    (Original post by kalen)
    Hey! sorry if this is a bit OT but I did a dissertation/project on synaesthesia and language evolution too! what was your dissertation about specifically??!
    It was largley an investigation into this paper by V. S. Ramachandran and the question it raises: http://psy.ucsd.edu/chip/pdf/Synaesth_JCS.pdf

    It was targeted at Human Evolution since that is the topic area I am interested in, and will be starting an MSc in it at UCL in September. Basically looking at whether the genetic evidence we have can support a role for synaesthesia in human evolution, specifically in the field of abstract thought and language.

    Being a Human Sciences diss it touched on evolution, genetics, neuro-physiology, some psychology, language, and a more general discussion on the relationship between hard science and the social sciences in this field and how collaboration could help push the frontiers in this area, and also how it is through the study of aberrations that we can try to uncover the underlying mechanisms of our brains, and thus learn more about what it is to be Human (as it were).

    - what subject was yours for?
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    (Original post by H&E)
    Is it true for Human Sciences you can take an option for finals where you build a human ala Dr. Frankenstein?
    Yes, but you also have to take the paper in "Mad Scientists: Past, Present and Future (and how they changed the world)"
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    (Original post by Catt)
    It was largley an investigation into this paper by V. S. Ramachandran and the question it raises: http://psy.ucsd.edu/chip/pdf/Synaesth_JCS.pdf

    It was targeted at Human Evolution since that is the topic area I am interested in, and will be starting an MSc in it at UCL in September. Basically looking at whether the genetic evidence we have can support a role for synaesthesia in human evolution, specifically in the field of abstract thought and language.

    Being a Human Sciences diss it touched on evolution, genetics, neuro-physiology, some psychology, language, and a more general discussion on the relationship between hard science and the social sciences in this field and how collaboration could help push the frontiers in this area, and also how it is through the study of aberrations that we can try to uncover the underlying mechanisms of our brains, and thus learn more about what it is to be Human (as it were).

    - what subject was yours for?
    My project was also focused on Ramachandran's work! I find it really fascinating...
    Mine was for Psychology. I carried out a research project on the cross-culturality of synaesthetic phonetic symbolism and used the results to support an hypothesis on how this could be linked to the evolution of language in humans (i.e. whether all languages evolved from the same primitive language and whether this was an evolution/expression of synaesthetic processes in the brain).

    Your dissertation sounds really interesting, and the Human Sciences course sounds fascinating as well, it covers many topics I'm interested in...I was considering doing a second BA and it was one of my options before deciding to do Masters instead...
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    (Original post by Catt)
    Yes, but you also have to take the paper in "Mad Scientists: Past, Present and Future (and how they changed the world)"
    *Writes application to switch course*
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    (Original post by H&E)
    *Writes application to switch course*
    You know it makes sense :cool:
 
 
 
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