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Supreme Court bans 10 Commandments watch

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    According to BBC News:

    "The US Supreme Court has ruled against the display of the biblical Ten Commandments inside courtrooms.
    Judges had been asked to decide whether such displays were merely a tribute to American history or an unconstitutional break with the church-state separation.

    The hearing focused on a display inside a court in the state of Kentucky. A ruling on a display in Texas is due.

    The issue has sparked heated debate between Christian conservatives and secularist campaigners."

    - Err I mean what on earth?? I really am struggling to see why these have been banned? I thought America was supposed to be tolerant of different people's religions etc?

    What's everyones opinion on this
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    I imagine its been ruled against as the courtroom should be void of religious ideology. It should be a reflection of the law and justice system which should be secular.
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    (Original post by frost105)
    I imagine its been ruled against as the courtroom should be void of religious ideology. It should be a reflection of the law and justice system which should be secular.
    Well yeah but I mean if the judges have religious motives removing a plaque on the wall isn't going to suddenly make them become entirely objective... they're still gonna have their views
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    (Original post by HearTheThunder)
    According to BBC News:

    "The US Supreme Court has ruled against the display of the biblical Ten Commandments inside courtrooms.
    Judges had been asked to decide whether such displays were merely a tribute to American history or an unconstitutional break with the church-state separation.

    The hearing focused on a display inside a court in the state of Kentucky. A ruling on a display in Texas is due.

    The issue has sparked heated debate between Christian conservatives and secularist campaigners."

    - Err I mean what on earth?? I really am struggling to see why these have been banned? I thought America was supposed to be tolerant of different people's religions etc?

    What's everyones opinion on this
    It's taking the separation of Church and State, which is on its own merits is an idea to be applauded, to ludicrous extremes IMO.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    It's taking the separation of Church and State, which is on its own merits an idea to be applauded, to ludicrous extremes IMO.
    If it has the stars and stripes, it should have the ten commandments.

    "God and country we serve".
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    Not to mention the national currency "In God We Trust"


    This also puts an interesting twist on the whole evolution vs. creationism debate previously brought into courtrooms.
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    (Original post by Gwenyth!)
    Not to mention the national currency "In God We Trust"
    I didn't know that was on US currency! Haha, separation of church and state my ass!

    But yes, religious symbols should definately not be in the courtroom in my opinion. If you have ten commandments, why shouldn't you have things from Buddhism, Hinduism etc. in such a "free" and "secular" country?
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    If you have ten commandments, why shouldn't you have things from Buddhism, Hinduism etc. in such a "free" and "secular" country?
    Because the US is a Christian country, not a Hindu one.
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    I didn't know that was on US currency! Haha, separation of church and state my ass!

    But yes, religious symbols should definately not be in the courtroom in my opinion. If you have ten commandments, why shouldn't you have things from Buddhism, Hinduism etc. in such a "free" and "secular" country?
    The Ten Commandments were the original laws for mankind therefore they are very relevant to a court room set-up.

    I would imagine that the other religions have a set of rules to be kept by their adherents that are very similar to the original laws given to Moses on Mount Sinai.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    The Ten Commandments were the original laws for mankind therefore they are very relevant to a court room set-up.

    I would imagine that the other religions have a set of rules to be kept by their adherents that are very similar to the original laws given to Moses on Mount Sinai.
    You make it sound like you actually believe that happened, ha ha ha... oh wait... you are serious... ha ha ha.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Because the US is a Christian country, not a Hindu one.
    Exactly.

    It's doing a nice job of keeping church and state separated, isn't it?
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    Most religions have a god, in god we trust doesn't neccessarily mean the christian god. I wouldn't like it if i was of a different religion and had the 10 commandments hanging over me.
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    Well the ten commandments should be there, as the USA is a Christian country and as yawn said, they were the original laws for mankind. The ten commandments could help the judge to reach a fair verdict.
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    Exactly.

    It's doing a nice job of keeping church and state separated, isn't it?
    It depends to what extreme you want to take this separation. I don't personally think it should be absolute; if it were then school children wouldn't even be able to take the pledge of allegience in schools because of the "One nation under God" verse. Such extremes to me seem utterly ridiculous.

    I was reading recently about a bright, but nevertheless poor individual, who was refused a state scholarship because his proposed college course was of a religious nature (Theology or something like that) It seems perverse to me that someone should be denied a scholarship to study anything that isn't secular.

    I think what I'm saying is.....how about some common ****in sense?
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    (Original post by Pepaim)
    I wouldn't like it if i was of a different religion and had the 10 commandments hanging over me.
    The US is a Christian country so it's really tough **** IMO. I see no reason to change what has been for years and years just because the few Hindus or Buddhist or Islamists that find themselves in court might feel uncomfortable with the Ten Commandments hanging overhead.
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    The US is so peculiar; outside its major cities it is a hotbed of fervent Christian religiosity (and sometimes even in them, see the above post), yet its government was founded by revolutionary Enlightenment intellecutals. Obviously these two forces conflict; sometimes the religious torrent sweeps in obviously anti-secular references (hence the relgious money,) but sometimes, when the reference is too blatant, such as the words "God is Thy lord and Thy Master" emblazoned in huge print in a court, the secular side intervenes.

    Rulings like these, however, likely are something that will soon end. If one of the 4 left-leaners (or to use American terminology, liberal) members (or the moderately conservative Sandra Day O'Connor, whos swing vote usually makes the decision, as it did today) retires, George Bush will likely be able to appoint a staunchly conservative member in his/her place to tip the balance. The relgious right is a growing concern in the US; one needs only to look at the reputation of Billy Graham - twenty years ago he was a derided fanatic, now he's an American hero. The secular side will continue to diminish in influence as traditionally secular capitalist Republicans continue their informal alliance with the religious right to further their own goals and as the Democrats attempt to maintain their historical black and latino bases (both for the most part religous populaces, rapidly growing (the latinos,) and without whom the Democrats cannot win elections) by becoming more friendly to religion. This trend is independent of Bush's immediate fortunes, which currently look as though they may become quite dire and cost the Republicans the 2006 election. It is (to me, sadly) inevitable as both sides increasingly pander to this large interest group.
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    (Original post by HearTheThunder)
    According to BBC News:

    "The US Supreme Court has ruled against the display of the biblical Ten Commandments inside courtrooms.
    Judges had been asked to decide whether such displays were merely a tribute to American history or an unconstitutional break with the church-state separation.

    The hearing focused on a display inside a court in the state of Kentucky. A ruling on a display in Texas is due.

    The issue has sparked heated debate between Christian conservatives and secularist campaigners."

    - Err I mean what on earth?? I really am struggling to see why these have been banned? I thought America was supposed to be tolerant of different people's religions etc?

    What's everyones opinion on this
    Thats rather odd considering their banknotes say "In God we trust"
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    I must say, the Americans confuse me.

    One week they're banning same sex marriage, the next week they are getting rid of the ten commandments! It really is quite difficult to understand the social and moral make-up of the US right now.

    As for this ban, whats the point? Isn't there more important things for the Supreme Court to be looking into? I very much doubt having the ten commandments on the wall is really going to affect anyone.
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    (Original post by Lord Waddell)
    Well the ten commandments should be there, as the USA is a Christian country and as yawn said, they were the original laws for mankind. The ten commandments could help the judge to reach a fair verdict.

    They were the original laws? Best let the Assyrians, Hittities, Egyptians, Chinese, Celts, Greeks, Medes and Ethiops know.

    The USA is NOT a christian country at a state level, it is supposedly secular. Just because say, 55% or 60% would call themselves christian does not mean that vital institutions such as the court should be seen to be promoting one religion over another, when in fact, their impartiality is what matters, and indeed the APPEARENCE of impartiality.
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    (Original post by ruthiepooos)
    Thats rather odd considering their banknotes say "In God we trust"
    There is a difference between "God" and "A Christian God".

    Plus, simply because one area of life makes the mistake, doesnt mean another should.
 
 
 
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