Hitch hiking to Morocco for charity

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La Esmerelda
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#1
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#1
Does anyone know how I can go about doing this?
There's no real website or anything and I can't join justgiving.com unless I do some other stuff....Help?

And if anyone is interested in joining then write away.
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smash and grab
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have you been onto http://hitch.lcd.org.uk?
they should be able to point you in the right direction...sorry i can't be more help!
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duke89
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http://www.lcdinternational.org/Nort...ales/Hitch.htm
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tootsies
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yeah, i'm doing it in march. was meant to be doing it last march but got ill just before going.

if you want to ask me any questions go ahead, i know all about it just quote me!
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Pinky27
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Hi Guys

I am really really keen to hitch hike to Morocco but i am not sure how to get the ball rolling with it.

I would really really appreciate any advice you can give me.

Thank you
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Origami Bullets
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(Original post by Pinky27)
Hi Guys

I am really really keen to hitch hike to Morocco but i am not sure how to get the ball rolling with it.

I would really really appreciate any advice you can give me.

Thank you
Have you read the links posted earlier in the thread?
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La Esmerelda
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(Original post by Pinky27)
Hi Guys

I am really really keen to hitch hike to Morocco but i am not sure how to get the ball rolling with it.

I would really really appreciate any advice you can give me.

Thank you
I ended up doing it-two years ago. Feel free to ask questions.
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wonderful_chiara
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I'm really really interested as well!!!! But I don't know exactly how it works...! I've read the website, but... I was wondering if maybe there is already something like a Group for the fund raising initiatives? : )
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Clip
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And for your next symposium on personal safety, you're going to investigate starting Ann Summers parties in Afghanistan?
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techno-thriller
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(Original post by Clip)
And for your next symposium on personal safety, you're going to investigate starting Ann Summers parties in Afghanistan?
Morroco isn't that dangerous.
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Clip
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(Original post by techno-thriller)
Morroco isn't that dangerous.
Getting into cars with strangers anywhere in the world is.
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-raisa
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(Original post by Clip)
Getting into cars with strangers anywhere in the world is.
I disagree.

I hitchhiked for the very first time last year while participating in a charity jailbreak. My partner and I got to Poland (hitched 16 different rides) within 24 hours, and I never felt in danger at any point.

You just have to use your common sense and not get into any car if there's something not right about it!
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standreams
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What I don't quite understand is why anyone would sponsor this?

Charity fundraising usually involves making an effort to do something which is challenging- not a budget backpacking holiday (which is what hitchhiking to Morocco is).

EDIT: Just realised this thread is ancient, but my question still stands- I'm genuinely curious about this.
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Clip
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(Original post by -raisa)
I disagree.

I hitchhiked for the very first time last year while participating in a charity jailbreak. My partner and I got to Poland (hitched 16 different rides) within 24 hours, and I never felt in danger at any point.

You just have to use your common sense and not get into any car if there's something not right about it!
So the money that TfL, the police and government spend on telling people not to used unlicensed cabs - that's all a waste is it? It's perfectly safe?
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hollo
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(Original post by Clip)
So the money that TfL, the police and government spend on telling people not to used unlicensed cabs - that's all a waste is it? It's perfectly safe?
The difference is that unlicensed cabs are fraudulently pretending to be something which they are not. A car on a road is a car on a road.

The majority of people don't mean any harm to anybody. The decline in hitch-hiking is a sad reflection of how we're all becoming more closed to each other.
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Clip
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(Original post by hollo)
The difference is that unlicensed cabs are fraudulently pretending to be something which they are not. A car on a road is a car on a road.

The majority of people don't mean any harm to anybody. The decline in hitch-hiking is a sad reflection of how we're all becoming more closed to each other.
Not really. It would have been even more dangerous for a young woman to try and thumb a ride across a country two or three hundred years ago.

As it is, I think it's crazy. It's essentially taking everything you have ever been taught about personal safety and throwing it in the bin.
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standreams
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I generally agree with the above (that hitchhiking, particularly for a single woman) is best avoided for the same reasons as avoiding unlicenced minicabs.

The caveat is that, in some countries, the principle of "any car is a taxi" applies. In some places, it's quite normal to flag down any passing car and ask for a lift (though this will usually not be free). Obviously, you check the driver first, don't get in if there are dodgy-looking passengers, have a look at the back seat to check nobody is hiding there first etc. I would never dream of doing this in the UK (where I'd question the motives of anyone stopping, as hitchhiking isn't the norm here), but in some other places don't think twice about doing it.
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The-Dream
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(Original post by standreams)
I generally agree with the above (that hitchhiking, particularly for a single woman) is best avoided for the same reasons as avoiding unlicenced minicabs.

The caveat is that, in some countries, the principle of "any car is a taxi" applies. In some places, it's quite normal to flag down any passing car and ask for a lift (though this will usually not be free). Obviously, you check the driver first, don't get in if there are dodgy-looking passengers, have a look at the back seat to check nobody is hiding there first etc. I would never dream of doing this in the UK (where I'd question the motives of anyone stopping, as hitchhiking isn't the norm here), but in some other places don't think twice about doing it.
such as where?
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Bachus
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(Original post by standreams)
I would never dream of doing this in the UK (where I'd question the motives of anyone stopping, as hitchhiking isn't the norm here), but in some other places don't think twice bout doing it.
I hitch frequently in England (I've been up to Glasgow and down to Dover for example). The majority of the people that pick you up are those who used to hitch so remember what it's like. A suitable level of common sense is onvious but I've done well over a thousand miles without major incident and have met some really nice people doing so, plus it's free and trains cost...
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standreams
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(Original post by The-Dream)
such as where?
Central Asia and a few other places in the former USSR.
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