To what extent was particiaption in the hip hop gendered? Watch

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kt42
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Hello, I need some help with my essay question:

Here is the question:

To What extent was participation in the hip hop gengered?

I have no Idea how to answer this, can anyone help me?

Thanks a lot!
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Originally posted by kt42
Hello, I need some help with my essay question:

Here is the question:

To What extent was participation in the hip hop gengered?

I have no Idea how to answer this, can anyone help me?

Thanks a lot!

I personally would say that hip-hop has no real gender. It's more to do with other aspects of identity, most notably class and race, rather than gender. It doesn't have the slightest bit of academic thought behind it. It has no critique of society, and it has in no way internalised academic discourse on the subject of gender. It is merely concerned with, in the most unacademic of ways, the issues of a particular race and class, and their identity.

So, Hip-Hop is in no way gendered.

Relevant Internet Pages:


http://www.rage.co.za/issue40/godess.htm
“For me hip-hop has no gender,” says Shameema. The girls are slouching in Eloise’s apartment in Woodstock, talking time out from working on their debut album in their home studio. “It’s built on an activist ideology and that’s what we’re trying to convey. We don’t just talk about gender - we’re not feminists!”

http://www.mysistahs.org/features/hiphop.htm

Hip-hop is the latest expressive manifestation of the past and current experience as well as the collective consciousness of African-American and Latino-American youth. But more than any music of the past, it also expresses mainstream American ideas that have now been internalized and embedded into the psyches of American people of color over time.

http://www.hiphopinfinity.com/Underg...ew&itemid=1012

It is obvious that San Diego duo Tez and Tajiee desperately want Trackin 4 Beats to stand at the forefront of the on-going discussion of hip hop's often confused definition of sexuality. They make some interesting choices in presenting their commentary on the confused gender roles both in the music and the culture. The most notable being their decision to couch this education in the guise of a boring faux-thuggy version of hip hop that is too forgettable to be called "generic." The drums never miss a "boom" or a "bap," and they avoid confusing the listener by never bothering to hit at any other point. The loops loop with nary a variation.
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kt42
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Report Thread starter 16 years ago
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Hi,

Thanks for your help, I have a question, the second wedsite page which is

http://www.mysistahs.org/features/hiphop.htm

Is this information from a book?
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No,

It is an essay from a teen sexuality website.
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kt42
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Report Thread starter 16 years ago
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I see, Thanks ^_^
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