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    Having a bit of trouble translating this sentence into English, can anyone help please?

    "So könnten Mediziner künftig aus der Körperzelle eines Diabetikers eine gesunde Bauchspeichedrüse nachwachsen lassen."
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    Therefore in the future doctors could grow a healthy pancreas from the cell of a diabetic.

    And Bauchspeicheldruese has a "L" in it.
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    Oops sorry, typo.

    Where does "lassen" come into it though?
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    Lassen goes with nachwachsen essentially. It means to "let grow". In German you often have lassen when you let something be done or having done something. You often see it with "reparieren lassen" which means to have (car etc) repaired, you are not doing it yourself. Also the verb "to build" takes lassen- bauen lassen.
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    I see, thank you
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    I would translate it as:

    Due to this, doctors could, in future, grow a healthy pancreas from a human cell of a diabetic.
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    I think, as it is passive in german, but active action taken by the scientists, it could be translated both ways. However, the doctors don't grow a pancreas, but the cells do.
    Nevertheless in my opinion i'd say: "Therefore (depending on context) In the future, doctors could (be able to) grow a healthy pancreas from a cell from a diabetic person."
    It's quite subjective.

    could (be able to)= could requires a prerequisit of conditional so the question "if what" is asked. By adding be able to, expresses the ability without the doubt of growth.
    so= therefore depending on the context, or thus, or simply so.
    a diabetic=although could be refered to as a person, it's unusual in english. needs to be accompanied by person.

    Translation is very subjective so it depends on the audience targeted.
    Enjoy translating
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    (Original post by Goldenratio)
    a diabetic=although could be refered to as a person, it's unusual in english. needs to be accompanied by person.
    I think you're right. Maybe it would sound better to say 'a diabetes sufferer', or something along those lines....
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    Yes, I mean, the word diabetic can't really be misinterpreted, and is indeed used in various latin based languages: spanish among those.
    I suppose a "a person with diabetes" is the most unambiguous of all. But it's just taste at the end of the day. Excuse the pun.
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    I don't see anything wrong with saying a diabetic, because a person who suffers from diabetes is caused a diabetic- especially given the scientific nature of the sentence :confused:
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    ahh someone is doing Zeitgeist 2
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    (Original post by Peach)
    I would translate it as:

    Due to this, doctors could, in future, grow a healthy pancreas from a human cell of a diabetic.
    You have translated correctly! You could put person behind diabetic but that is up to you.
    Apart from that you have got the German sentence 100% correct.

    I think I can tell, because even if I am bilingual due to having lived in Germany for so long, German is now my stronger language meaning I'd be very good at translating English into German but not so good the other way round. But I still "feel" when a translation from G into E ist really good.
 
 
 
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