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    Im an international postgraduate applicant to KCL and Nottingham, for their War Studies Dept. and School of Politics respectively. I was wondering if anyone could tell me the difference between the two, stronger program, faculty, etc. Any info would be great. Thanks!
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    War Studies > everything.
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    KCL is much better then Notts.
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    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    War Studies > everything.
    i know a guy who does war studies (or rather he will do again next year- hes on sabbatical at the moment)
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    i know a guy who does war studies (or rather he will do again next year- hes on sabbatical at the moment)
    Cool, ask him to describe the course for the original poster if you can- I'm starting in September so I can't really prove how great it is, yet.
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    I appreciate the opinions, but could you tell me why its so much better? Im getting a general feeling that you are all correct, but would like to know some info so I can make a good decision.
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    KCL is world renowned. Notts is not really. Its a decent place, but doesnt carry the marketing power of Kings.

    I always rate UK multi discipline institutions like this: (exc. specialist ones like Imperial)

    Ox
    Cam
    UCL
    Lse
    Kings
    soas

    Then there is a BIG gap...
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    Maybe switch LSE/Kings around.
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    Hopefully phillipsm will see this thread, he delights in any oppurtunity to explain why War Studies at kcl is the most elite and generally awesome course in the entire world, featuring case studies by Chinese wise men, or something.
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    Chinese wise men huh?...Thanks for the input, please tell him about it, and please keep the info coming.
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    I remember reading about the MI5 recruiting from the KCL War Studies department - so that 'could' be an added bonus :p:

    Have a look at this thread: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/t66107.html

    I personally would choose the KCL War Studies course, its one of the most respectable degrees that KCL offers, it is a world renowned department and has a 6* rating which is the highest any department can get.
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    Really?

    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    Hopefully phillipsm will see this thread, he delights in any oppurtunity to explain why War Studies at kcl is the most elite and generally awesome course in the entire world, featuring case studies by Chinese wise men, or something.
    Now I can't disappoint, can I?

    War Studies. Where to start...

    The word 'studies' is often used to separate 'wishy-washy' subject from those which are rather more academically vigorous. That said, such a presumption isn't true for the WS course (take, for instance, the fact that the grade requirements for BA entry are rising from ABB to AAB for 2006 entry). And, while many of your peers might not have heard of the course, anyone who's anyone know's about it - and here I talk about the government, diplomatic service, military and so forth. There was actually quite a deliberation between the founders of the Chair of War Studies about what to name the chair - and I would be happy to post a potted history from a talk by Professor Sir Michael Howard about its establishment (and he, incidentally, held the first chair).

    As suggested, KCL was the first Chair of War Studies to be established in the world, and is really the only course of its kind offered in the UK. You might here of it and similar courses being offered at elite military academies etc in the UK; but the WS Department often form a backbone for this (take, for instance, KCL's Defence Studies Department at the JSCSC, or the Group's MA Programme at the Royal College of Defence Studies). The course is rightly 'elitist', so I am often told - students actively choose the Department, which is the foremost department in its field.

    To give you an indication, it was ranked third after Oxford and Warwick in the Times league table for Politics/International Relations this year, and it has received the highest possible ratings in successive Research Assessment Exercises - the Department now falls into the rather scarce category of '6 *'. Further, The War Studies Group - including the Departments of War Studies and Defence Studies - scored the highest rating of 24 in the Quality Assurance Agency Subject Review assessment of teaching carried out between 29 October and 2 November 2001.

    Perhaps the greatest strength of the WS Department and course is that they are inherently multi-disciplinary - students leave with an indepth knowledge and a formidable skills set. Also, speaking to a former RN Officer who specialises in IR and who taught at King's, he recommended that specialising in a field (such as War) within IR is the way forward. Also very important, all of the Department's academic staff play a full part in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels to ensure the maximum cross-fertilisation between teaching and research. In addition, students have access to visiting academics, serving officers and other experts through conferences and special events laid on by the Department.

    As a student of the Department, you will also benefit from many established links held with individuals and organisations in the field. The Department has excellent working relationships with a number of other leading establishments in the field of security, defence, war studies and within the broad remit of international relations. These include the International Institute of Strategic Studies (IISS), the Royal Institute of International Affairs (RIIA), the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), the Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC), the Royal College of Defence Studies (RCDS), the Imperial War Museum, the Ministry of Defence, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Parliament, the BBC (Bush House, the headquarters of the BBC World Service, is opposite King's College Strand campus), the UK Ministry of Defence, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the European Commission, the British Council and the John D and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation in Chicagoand a range of other organisations.

    You can't really beat its prestige, standing, quality of teaching or quality of staff!

    For more information, see the Department's website at http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/wsg/prospectus/whydept.html.
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    Although I don't know a great deal about it, I'd second all of that - War Studies is probably one of the premier and most highly regarded departments at King's - academic staff from that department are frequently shown/quoted in the media, along with staff from the Institute of Psychiatry (which is a part of King's College Hospital).
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    Phillip, thanks for the insight. I'm still waiting to hear back from them, but I am leaning toward KCL. Just curious but how long did it take to hear back from them? Undergrad or post?

    (Original post by ianfiske)
    Phillip, thanks for the insight. I'm still waiting to hear back from them, but I am leaning toward KCL. Just curious but how long did it take to hear back from them? Undergrad or post?
    I applied for the undergraduate course, entry September 2004. My UCAS Application was sent off 30 September 2004, and I emailed them to confirm receipt - to which they replied very quickly.

    I then received, quite after the UCAS deadline in mid-January, an invitation to interview. This was expected; obviously they had to wait for all applications before shortlisting for interview.

    I had my interview at the end of February, and was told that I would hear the result 3 - 4 weeks later; I heard it under a week later!

    But then my interview was unique; it was twice the usual length (abaout an hour, as opposed to half an hour; the guy before me didn't turn up, and the interviewer was bored!), and he told me at the end that I should be confident about receiving an offer. All good!
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    My app was quite differant. I'm a Post-grad app who applied 15 June. They lost my supporting documents, which I sent FedEx, finally finding them on June 30. I've got no idea what my chances are now. Any thoughts either way?

    (Original post by ianfiske)
    My app was quite differant. I'm a Post-grad app who applied 15 June. They lost my supporting documents, which I sent FedEx, finally finding them on June 30. I've got no idea what my chances are now. Any thoughts either way?
    So that's a 15 day gap in your application? Which, in my opinion, is not very long in comparison to the whole application process. I have heard, although it is not in my experience (yet, perhaps?), that admin is not too strong a point of the WS Department - but I'm sure that if you were able to show a genuine interest, commitment and enthusiasm for the course that the delay won't affect your application (much, at least).

    By the way, have you contacted the Department to talk about the situation?
 
 
 
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