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    I am doing History GCSE, and i really struggle with the sources paper. Does anyone have any advice for what I should do because I have my mocks next term, and if i don't improve i am f*cked. So any tips would be much appreciated.
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    Well it's difficult to give advice without knowing exactly what you're struggling with. I mean the general advice for source papers is always make sure you use all the sources you're told to, comment on their potential bias (using what you're told about where they're from, who wrote them, why they were written etc), make comparisons, try to use all the sources on the paper and stuff like that. If you're having particular trouble with either picture or written sources or just with what to write then it would be helpful to know so we can tailor the advice to fit that. Also what topic are the sources on? After all we can't give specific advice on sources we don't know anything about ourselves. If there are particular ones you're stuck on you could post them or something and ppl could give you their opinions?
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    Firstly, if you're in Y10, you've got plenty of time to sort out the problems you're having at the moment. Mocks aren't that important, it's what happens in the real exams that matters and you've got a whole year to prepare for them.

    I can't really talk like an expert because I don't find out my results until the end of August, but the main tips for the sources paper are:

    * Give yourself enough time, I ran out of time on my GCSE one, a lot of the highest marked questions are at the end of the paper and you have to leave enough time for them.

    * Read the question, a lot of the exam is testing your reading and writing skills as much as your history knowledge. You need to try and include as much knowledge as you can but take the source at face value, don't dress it up to be something it's not. I heard a lot of people coming out of the exam saying what they'd written and they seemed to have just made stuff up and jumped to conclusions.
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    I remember at GCSE we were told to analyse sources by NOPS:

    Nature
    Origin
    Purpose

    Damn, I can't remember 'S' . When I do remember, I'll let you know...
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    :eek: ive just finished my history exams 2 weeks ago
    heres a few links to help you:
    http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/gcselinks/source.html
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...textrev1.shtml
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=122802
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    (Original post by Dizzykiki)
    Well it's difficult to give advice without knowing exactly what you're struggling with. I mean the general advice for source papers is always make sure you use all the sources you're told to, comment on their potential bias (using what you're told about where they're from, who wrote them, why they were written etc), make comparisons, try to use all the sources on the paper and stuff like that. If you're having particular trouble with either picture or written sources or just with what to write then it would be helpful to know so we can tailor the advice to fit that. Also what topic are the sources on? After all we can't give specific advice on sources we don't know anything about ourselves. If there are particular ones you're stuck on you could post them or something and ppl could give you their opinions?
    I can never find anything to say about the cartoons that they give you.
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    The thing with the cartoon is to recognise the context - for example the famous one of Hitler and Stalin dancing on a map of Europe. Now the context is the troubled peace before 1941. You can also determine the fact that Stalin and Hitler don't like each other. There is often a cartoonist's signature on it so you could determine the origin of the cartoon. It's the little things like that - they simply want to see if you can use your knowledge of a period to draw out ideas from the cartoon in front of you. Try looking at some of the most famous cartoons - Goebels was often represented as a rat-like figure for instance now if you have a second world war cartoon and you have hitler and a rat-like figure in the background you can instantly spot that that might be Goebels. Things like that it's worth thinking about with cartoon sources. It's true though that the cartoon source, the picture source in general is one of the harder types to crack because cartoonists use a different language but once you do crack it, then it's fairly simple.

    Good luck!
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    I've just finished GCSE History and I would agree with the advice given here. Remember to give as much information as possible. If the question says ''Using the source only'', you will not get credit for using your own knowledge, simularly if it says ''use the source and your own knowledge'' you must do both to achieve the highest marks. Remember to:
    * Look at the origin of the source [i.e. where it's come from e.g. British Historian etc]
    * Look at the date of the source
    *Don't say that because a source is written after the event, it is unteliable - this is NOT valid - over time, Historians have access to more information
    *Don't take it at face value - look for meaning in the source
    * Be able to recognise certain characters that appear regularly (e.g. Hitler etc]

    Click here
    [not sure if that's worked] for mlore advice on sourcework.
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    Well, there are of course many formulae for tackling source questions. The one we were taught at A Level (which I don't like but I suppose it does have some good points) is:

    V = DACC

    In other words:
    Validity (V) is first assessed with reference to the date of the source (D). Using Nazi Germany as an example, an early-ish historian such as Bullock writing in "Hitler: A Study in Tyranny" (1952) would be likely to have a different viewpoint from someone such as Fest (c. 1996). If you consider the reasons for this, certain things should become apparent. Firstly, that Bullock is writing pretty close to the end of the war, so would still perhaps have his views coloured by his experiences of wartime. Also, essentially with this period, the Cold War had not ended. This means that Bullock would not have had information available to him from the archives in Moscow that a later historian such as Fest would have had. Also, the date is useful from the point of view of considering which schools of thought were popular at the time. For example, the 1970s saw a focus on Socialist/Communist resistance to the Nazis by Marxist historians such as Spielvogel, whereas today people are far more likely to take a balanced view. With contemporary sources, consider their proximity to major events of the period. For example, a piece of anti-Communist propaganda issued by the Nazi regime on 28th February 1933 would be significant as it's just after the Reichstag Fire when the Nazis were trying desperately to discredit the communists.

    The second important thing to think about is the attribution of the source (A). That is, who wrote it and why. Using the examples of Fest and Bullock again, Bullock, as a British Historian, is likely to favour the Western Allies in any analysis of the Nazi regime. However, Fest as a German would be likely to take a more sympathetic view of resistance. With contemporary figures (those from the time), consider things like political affiliations. For example, a Nazi would be likely to be sympathetic to the regime, but someone like Churchill would have denounced them (a fairly obvious example but the point is made)

    Thirdly the context of the source is critical (C). What is it? A letter, for example, may be more honest than a speech, but may be a personal appeal for support or an attempt to justify actions. A diary is likely to be honest, as it is not intended for publication. Things like memoirs or autobiography are more difficult, as they are intended for publication and so may be sensationalised. Newspaper reports are designed to sell papers, and not necessarily to report accurately. Speeches are a public address and so are likely to be an attempt to justify actions...

    Finally, the content of the source (C). Use examples to support what the source says, but also consider what it doesn't tell you, and alternative interpretations.

    The key thing is to know the main figures of the period, and the main historians of the period, and a little about their general views.
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    (Original post by kew96158)
    I remember at GCSE we were told to analyse sources by NOPS:

    Nature
    Origin
    Purpose

    Damn, I can't remember 'S' . When I do remember, I'll let you know...
    Source? Maybe it's "source" so you remember to include quotations? That's a good way to learn it!
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    (Original post by shivani singhal)
    I am doing History GCSE, and i really struggle with the sources paper. Does anyone have any advice for what I should do because I have my mocks next term, and if i don't improve i am f*cked. So any tips would be much appreciated.
    Which exam board is this? If you take a look at their website, there will probably be advice for candidates and possibly some sample essays. If you make sure you focus and revise well for your mocks, and learn from any mistakes, then the actual exam will be made far less painful! Take the opportunity to do extra exam essays, too.

    Some of the revision guides out there are quite good, too, depending on how you work. I think CGP do lots of them. I used them a great deal for Science, but I think there's one for History, as well. Technique is really important; I spent my revision time mainly learning the details, but had a good number of sessions where I focused on how I was going to answer each question, too.
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    With cartoons you have to work out what the artist is trying to say and most of the time there are fairly obvious clues if you know what you're looking for - after all they were intended for popular consumption. Figures are usually caricatured to make them easily recognisable or will be labelled in some way. Always look at the caption if there is one to see if that gives you any clues. One of my favourite examples is one that one of my teachers was unbelievably dense about! It was a cartoon of Germany kneeling in a river shouting 'Help! Help! I drown!' whilst Britain and France stood on the bank next to a life ring, which said 'loan' on it saying 'Try standing on your own two feet'. The major point was that Germany could have saved herself without the help of a loan from the others as she could easily have stood up; however my teacher decided that Germany was portrayed kneeling simply because there hadn't been enough room on the paper!!! :eek: I mean we'd already been through it with our other teacher so we were completely gobsmacked! Anyway I'll stop rambling now... which topic are your sources on? Also as random as it sounds it might help to look at the cartoons in modern papers where you know what they're in reference to to see how they work - I mean they're not going to be exactly the same but it might give you some idea.
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    (Original post by xx_ambellina_xx)
    V = DACC
    thanks, i will tryin to apply that and see if it works any better
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    (Original post by oriel historian)
    The thing with the cartoon is to recognise the context - for example the famous one of Hitler and Stalin dancing on a map of Europe. Now the context is the troubled peace before 1941. You can also determine the fact that Stalin and Hitler don't like each other. There is often a cartoonist's signature on it so you could determine the origin of the cartoon. It's the little things like that - they simply want to see if you can use your knowledge of a period to draw out ideas from the cartoon in front of you. Try looking at some of the most famous cartoons - Goebels was often represented as a rat-like figure for instance now if you have a second world war cartoon and you have hitler and a rat-like figure in the background you can instantly spot that that might be Goebels. Things like that it's worth thinking about with cartoon sources. It's true though that the cartoon source, the picture source in general is one of the harder types to crack because cartoonists use a different language but once you do crack it, then it's fairly simple.

    Good luck!
    Thanks, i think I understand better how to look at a cartoon source. Let's see if it pays off
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    Never get too laid back.
    No-one from our class revised AS Sources paper, as was assumed to be easiest.
    I got 74/90 and 85/90 for other two, but barely scraped a C in the Document Studies....
    You have been warned! lol.
 
 
 
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