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    Whats the chances of getting into a top uni with the following situation.

    I've taken 2 AS levels (B,D) and 2 A-Levels (pred. C, U). I'm going to college to do a set of new A-Levels as i took the wrong subjects in the first place and need better grades anyway. So i take 4 AS's and drop 1 in the 2nd year to get 3 A-Levels.

    Therefore my total would be:

    3 AS's
    5 A-Levels (but 4 if you don't count the U).

    If i get AAA in my new subjects (which i have been told i am perfectly capable of), then will top unis still take me even though I messed up the first time round??

    ATM i have an offer of DD to go to BCUC but i'm not going to make it, hence going to college.
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    What are your current subjects, what would your new subjects be, and what would you be applying for at uni?
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    The AS's i have are Gen. Studies and Chemistry and currently my A2's are History (c) and Biology (u). The A-Levels i will take are English Literature and i'm not sure what else yet and I hope to study English at university which i need 3 good grades for.
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    A U is a fail, so that doesn't count as an A-level. My suggestion would be to phone or email the admissions tutor for English lit at the universities you're thinking of applying to and ask them what they would think about you essentially taking double the amount of time as anyone else to get A-levels. English can be extremely competitive depending on where you apply, so it's worth finding out the likeliehood of you getting offers. However, by the time you've finished your new set of A-levels, you'll be 20 (I assume, since you would have been 18 when you finished the first lot) so if you then took a gap year and applied when you were 21, you'd be classed as a mature student and therefore your qualifications wouldn't be quite as important.
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    thats not strictly true. Mature students can get accepted onto courses with lower grade thstandards providing ere are other things to take into account, such as work experience and other academic achievements etc. Lets say for example, a student gets BBB instead of AAB, but has 6 years of work experience and excellent references, then they stand a good chance of getting in. Unfortunately, if 'justchar' comes out of college at 21, i don't expect she'd automatically get the 'mature student treatment'. So i wouldn't take a gap year for that reason, unless you have some plans that could improve your application.

    If you can get AAA and can convince universities you've reformed yourself, i think you'll be fine to get into a good university, even if it means applying after you have these grades.
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    ok then i'll ring some places up and ask and go from there thanks.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    A U is a fail, so that doesn't count as an A-level. My suggestion would be to phone or email the admissions tutor for English lit at the universities you're thinking of applying to and ask them what they would think about you essentially taking double the amount of time as anyone else to get A-levels. English can be extremely competitive depending on where you apply, so it's worth finding out the likeliehood of you getting offers. However, by the time you've finished your new set of A-levels, you'll be 20 (I assume, since you would have been 18 when you finished the first lot) so if you then took a gap year and applied when you were 21, you'd be classed as a mature student and therefore your qualifications wouldn't be quite as important.
    they'er not going to penalise you for taking longer to do your a levels. What counts is what you've got in the end and how you spent your time. It is admirable that they are sticking it out and finishing the courses, and that they are mature enough to realise they took the wrong subjects and start again from scratch.

    I think your age will be an advantage, and the extra years will probably benefit you - you'll be better off at uni as well, from learning how to learn, as it were, and also as if you ARE 21 when you are classed as a mature student. On the ucas form when you apply they will see the grades yuo have, and you can paint it as a positive thing that you restarted, instead of giving up.

    In the long run careers wise it will be better too good luck with it all. And as the others said, if in any doubt, ring the universities - they will be best off to adfvise. My boyfriend is on a course with grade requirements of BBB - he got a C and an E at a level! he worked for a couple of years, not intending to go to uni, and then applied right before the deadline and got 3 unconditional offers!
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    (Original post by ksncl)
    thats not strictly true. Mature students can get accepted onto courses with lower grade thstandards providing ere are other things to take into account, such as work experience and other academic achievements etc. Lets say for example, a student gets BBB instead of AAB, but has 6 years of work experience and excellent references, then they stand a good chance of getting in. Unfortunately, if 'justchar' comes out of college at 21, i don't expect she'd automatically get the 'mature student treatment'. So i wouldn't take a gap year for that reason, unless you have some plans that could improve your application.

    If you can get AAA and can convince universities you've reformed yourself, i think you'll be fine to get into a good university, even if it means applying after you have these grades.
    if you've got AAA, i don't think the unis will really ask for you to 'prove yourself', especially those that don't interview - your references and personal statement should do that.
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    Well she said she's capable of AAA, which is great, but all i was saying is that being 21 wouldn't do her any favours without any work experience etc.

    when i said she has to 'prove herself', i meant through her PS and references.
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    (Original post by ksncl)
    Well she said she's capable of AAA, which is great, but all i was saying is that being 21 wouldn't do her any favours without any work experience etc.

    when i said she has to 'prove herself', i meant through her PS and references.
    and i don't think it will go against her.
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    I don't fully understand how you can be so sure of AAA, but if you got it then you would stand a good chance at most courses at most unis. If I'm honest with you, though, I can't see you getting those grades.

    It all depends on what you consider good. Oxbridge could well laugh at your face, but liverpool and other red bricks may give you a chance.
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    (Original post by ThePenguinMafia)
    I don't fully understand how you can be so sure of AAA, but if you got it then you would stand a good chance at most courses at most unis. If I'm honest with you, though, I can't see you getting those grades.

    It all depends on what you consider good. Oxbridge could well laugh at your face, but liverpool and other red bricks may give you a chance.
    lovely. i've got to agree however, it's unlikely you'd achieve AAA if you're predicted those grades, sorry. don't set your hopes too high, but at the same time, aim to eventually go to university, as i'm sure you could.
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    Negativity won't get him anywhere. I know of someone who got a C in Business Studies and an N (as they had then) in Geography when he was 18. Then at 22 he got AAB in Biology, Chemistry and Maths and is now doing medicine at Manchester.

    Theres always hope, and in my oppinion good grades at A level are as much about effort as inteligence.
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    (Original post by Blates as)
    Negativity won't get him anywhere. I know of someone who got a C in Business Studies and an N (as they had then) in Geography when he was 18. Then at 22 he got AAB in Biology, Chemistry and Maths and is now doing medicine at Manchester.

    Theres always hope, and in my oppinion good grades at A level are as much about effort as inteligence.
    Exactly, and if he chose the wrong subjects, he wouldn't have been motivated to put the effort in, hence the poor grades. This mentality of 'if you don't get A*s at GCSE, you'll never get anywhere' is worrying :rolleyes:
 
 
 

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