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    What are the differences between an MMath and MSc in Maths and Computer Science?

    Most universities offer the MSc course but some universities offer only the MMath course.
    Is it jus that one has more maths involved in it than the other?
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    MSc is a postgraduate degree, while MMath is an undergraduate/integrated masters degree. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master%...aduate_Masters
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master%...aduate_Masters
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    (Original post by trev)
    MSc is a postgraduate degree, while MMath is an undergraduate/integrated masters degree. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master%...aduate_Masters
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master%...aduate_Masters
    Thanks Trev, this has made my understanding much clearer

    Will employers favour students who have done a BSc and then a masters or a MSc then a masters?

    What im thinking here is the masters degree is the same so the student who has done a BSc then a masters will be in the same position as the student who has done the MSc then a masters.
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    (Original post by goku999)
    Thanks Trev, this has made my understanding much clearer

    Will employers favour students who have done a BSc and then a masters or a MSc then a masters?

    What im thinking here is the masters degree is the same so the student who has done a BSc then a masters will be in the same position as the student who has done the MSc then a masters.
    If you've done a MMath, you already have a masters degree already. No need to do a MSc then a masters.

    Not sure about the employment thing though. I think employers would employ a person with an undergraduate/integrated masters degree than a BSc though.
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    A proper masters, i.e. an MSc is worth more than an integrated masters i.e. MSci or MMath. But it really depends on what kind of job you are applying for.
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    (Original post by AMM)
    A proper masters, i.e. an MSc is worth more than an integrated masters i.e. MSci or MMath. But it really depends on what kind of job you are applying for.
    Would the course content of a 4th year integrated masters be similar or completely different from an MSc?
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    (Original post by goku999)
    Thanks Trev, this has made my understanding much clearer

    Will employers favour students who have done a BSc and then a masters or a MSc then a masters?

    What im thinking here is the masters degree is the same so the student who has done a BSc then a masters will be in the same position as the student who has done the MSc then a masters.
    Sorry if I've misunderstood - an MSc *is* a masters degree (postgraduate) so you don't do an MSc then a masters. You could do a BSc then an MSc or an MMath then an MSc but not an MSc then an MMath as that would be a step down (assuming they're all in the same subejct)!
    As you can do an MMath then an MSc, the MSc is a higher level qualification than the MMath - postgraduate qualifications are at a higher level.
    As for the difference between content in the 4th year of an undergraduate masters and an MSc, yes they would be different (otherwise there would be no point in someone with an MMath doing an MSc). MSc degrees tend to be more specialised than MMath courses so will cover a narrower range of topics. You can also do either a taught MSc (where they teach you things) or a research MSc (where you research something to do with the degree title).
    All of the above is correct as far as I'm aware but I'll freely admit I'm only an undergraduate on an MEng course so I'm happy to be corrected by someone who knows more about the topic than me!
    Jenn xx
 
 
 
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