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    English Literature is the English qualification.

    English language is like a slightly more upmarket meeja studies.
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    (Original post by Sami C)
    Language just seems so stupid to me. I can't see any logic in doing it for A level.
    I'd say the same for Literature. I just don't get why it's so "respected". You read a book or poem and write about it.
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    I'd say the same for Literature. I just don't get why it's so "respected". You read a book or poem and write about it.
    It goes deeper than that; you learn to write in a very analytical manner. You also learn to evaluate and write structured essays coherently. It requires a greater academic ability to be able to read something, evaluate it, (sometimes even de-crypt it), uncover the message, and analyse many forms of language, poetic devices, symbolisms etc etc... In language, this is a choice for many students who are "academically challanged" as English Language is very simple.
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    I'd say the same for Literature. I just don't get why it's so "respected". You read a book or poem and write about it.
    It's more respected because it's existed as an A-level subject for longer than English language, and for some stupid reason, any subject that's existed for a long time is seen as difficult whereas any new subject is seen as a joke :rolleyes:
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    there's only so much you can do with english language... creativce writing, media etc. with english literatur, you can lok at so many different types of literature and compare, analyse, + read!!!!
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    It's more respected because it's existed as an A-level subject for longer than English language, and for some stupid reason, any subject that's existed for a long time is seen as difficult whereas any new subject is seen as a joke :rolleyes:
    Yep. The ISC published a report about this; it was about the decline in more traditional A-Levels such as Maths, Science and Modern Languages, and the increase in people taking Media Studies, Psychology etc. It basically touched upon the idea that these new subjects being taken were the cause for more students achieving AAA at A-Level - draw your own conclusions.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    It goes deeper than that; you learn to write in a very analytical manner. You also learn to evaluate and write structured essays coherently. It requires a greater academic ability to be able to read something, evaluate it, (sometimes even de-crypt it), uncover the message, and analyse many forms of language, poetic devices, symbolisms etc etc... In language, this is a choice for many students who are "academically challanged" as English Language is very simple.
    Personally, I found that over-analysing Literature, even at GCSE level, took the enjoyment out of reading.

    Have you actually studied English Language?
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Yep. The ISC published a report about this; it was about the decline in more traditional A-Levels such as Maths, Science and Modern Languages, and the increase in people taking Media Studies, Psychology etc. It basically touched upon the idea that these new subjects being taken were the cause for more students achieving AAA at A-Level - draw your own conclusions.
    Personally I draw the conclusion that the ISC are a bunch of snobs and denying their students the opportunity to study really interesting and useful subjects because they want to boast about how many people they have taking maths, sciences, languages etc, but obviously everyone will have their own opinions on this
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    Personally, I found that over-analysing Literature, even at GCSE level, took the enjoyment out of reading.

    Have you actually studied English Language?
    Over-analysing everything at A-level definitely takes the enjoyment out of reading
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    Personally, I found that over-analysing Literature, even at GCSE level, took the enjoyment out of reading.

    Have you actually studied English Language?
    I can see what your saying. After I finished "Of Mice and Men" in school, everytime I watched a film or read a book I automatically would start analysing stuff. But it's a good skill to be able to have.

    I have not studied English Language apart from at GCSE. The people who take it at my school are D/E grade students, whilst Literature students are A*/A/B at GCSE.

    Sorry I meant the Language students are around D/E at A-Level.
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    Personally, I found that over-analysing Literature, even at GCSE level, took the enjoyment out of reading.

    Have you actually studied English Language?
    ]i do agree with that, but i tend to read the book at least twice, to get a feel for it with emjoyment and then be able to analyse it
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    At my school, most of the top set from Year 11 went on to take English Language at A-level rather than English Literature or the combined course. It was almost definitely because the top set GCSE class had a Language specialist and he is a very good teacher. In fact, the popularity (if you could call it that ) of Literature in my school is dwindling, with last year's AS group getting an average grade of D and Language students gaining almost all As and Bs.

    Anyhooo, I think both Englishes are boring. I did Language at AS-level and it was so dry. I started the A2 course, and that was even worse, so I dropped it. The only module I enjoyed was the "Original Writing" one.
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    At my school, most of the top set from Year 11 went on to take English Language at A-level rather than English Literature or the combined course. It was almost definitely because the top set GCSE class had a Language specialist and he is a very good teacher. In fact, the popularity (if you could call it that ) of Literature in my school is dwindling, with last year's AS group getting an average grade of D and Language students gaining almost all As and Bs.

    Anyhooo, I think both Englishes are boring. I did Language at AS-level and it was so dry. I started the A2 course, and that was even worse, so I dropped it. The only module I enjoyed was the "Original Writing" one.
    That's just your school, and doesn't prove much I'm afraid. Literature is far more respected than Language by Universities. End of.
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    Speaking from experience (I completed my English lang and lit A-level about 3 weeks ago now) I can honestly say that it is a waste of an a-level. The concepts that the whole course is based around (on OCR at least) can be fathomed in about a week, once you understand them you can apply them to anything. For the set text exams I didn’t even bother reading the books and still managed to get a grade B in the exams.

    For me, English lang and lit was just a waste, even though I am hopefully gonna get a decent grade I really don’t feel as if I have worked for it like in my other a-levels. If you want my advice, stick to literature, that’s what I wished I would have taken looking back
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    What you guys have outlined as English Language at your schools/colleges are nothing like what i do. I did one module at the beginning of the year studying analysing normal texts and it was only one part of the exam. I haven't done any creative writing and thank god because other than poetry, i'm rubbish at creative writing! In AS we did one module of analysing texts mainly advertisements etc as an introduction, then a coursework where we analysed any text we chose and produced 2 pieces of our own that are some way related to the text we chose and then wrote a commentary.

    I chose a chapter from the book 'Toast' by Nigel Slater, then produced a leaflet based on nutrition for children and then a magazine article about celebrity food tastes.

    After that we went on to do about language and representation which was about how language goes through processes of pejoration and ameliaration and how language affects the way we think and what politically correct language is.

    We then did child language acquisition where we learnt how children go about learning language, learnt about phoenetics and what sounds children learn first, the way their mind adapts to language etc.

    Finally we learnt to transcribe conversations and analyse them, looking at dominance, speaker moves, non fluency features and loads more stuff and then we learn about gender differences in coversation-for example, how women are starting to use more taboo lexis than men and how women are more supportive in conversation.

    I would say that it's not easy, especially acquisition, but i find it very interesting and enjoyable and personally find english literature boring so i'm biast. Taking english language at AS level has made me want to carry it on at A-level and to take English Language and linguistics at degree level.

    I think only you can decided which is best for you. AS level english language is nothing like GCSE English and i didn't know what to expect but am glad i chose it because i spent all of my years at grammar school analysing poems and books and found it boring and was ready to try something different even though i got an A in English and could easily have carried on doing the Lit side of things. Lit and lang together generally seems to be about creative writing, analysing texts etc.

    You need to find out more about the exact courses your school/college offers and decide from there. English language courses seem to be really varied, and just to let you know i took AQA specification A.
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    My school sucked at GCSE. Instead of having English sets, they just had mixed classes. So you would have a mixture of abled English students, and unabled English students; made it really complicated and probably affected everyones' grades.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    That's just your school, and doesn't prove much I'm afraid. Literature is far more respected than Language by Universities. End of.
    The same goes for your school; just because the average grade for Language is D/E, and Literature attracts brighter students doesn't mean much. Unfortunately, Literature is worshipped by universities, for reasons which I will never understand.
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    Lit looks a lot more interesting than lang, but I'm glad I don't do either, because the marking seems to always get ****ed up spectactularly.
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    (Original post by -Sian-)
    The same goes for your school; just because the average grade for Language is D/E, and Literature attracts brighter students doesn't mean much. Unfortunately, Literature is worshipped by universities, for reasons which I will never understand.
    Just because you are frustrated that everyone is basically saying the subject you chose is nothing in comparison to Lit, doesn't mean you can demean everyone elses' choices.
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    Whizz kid will you stop saying end of please? You sound like Saskia.

    To those who said that analysing texts sucked the enjoyment out of them, i don't find that at all! It makes me see things i didn't see before and understand what i'm reading more. I also really enjoy understanding the contexts of a poem or novel, 'The Ballad of reading Gaol' written by Wilde is all the more poignant once you understand why he wrote it and the hidden meanings within it. xx
 
 
 

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