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    I reckon I'd prefer English Lit. I prefer analysing prose texts rather than the media...
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    english literature is much much harder! last year in my school nearly everyone doing eng lang got A's and only three people doing eng lit got A's!!
    so much tougher to get a good grade, well thats my opinion, ive drooped it now
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    Well in my school over 15 people got an A in Eng. Lit. and only 1 person did in the combined course. It varies and you can't argue which is better using results. Certainly English Lang won't be accepted if you want to do a Literature based degree, but if you want to do Linguistics, Lang would be better. The combined course is nothing like GCSEs, and is demanding in the sense that to get the top grades you have to consistently apply language AND literature frameworks when analysing a text at AS at least. At A2 you have to do an entire literature module, using literary frameworks, only using Chaucer who is an author of great linguistic interest. Everything here is subjective, you could never pick a "better" one as it depends on the person entirely.
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    Of course English Literature is harder. It's a proper A level, that's why it's valued.

    Both are analysing language, context, structure, tone, register etc etc. - literature texts just have some depth and you need to understand them.
    Any idiot can understand an advert. Take English Lit if you want to show that you can understand a story with themes and characters and moral questions.
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    Woo I'm taking English Lit! I didn't know my thread would go this long:p:
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    I started both. I was very unimpressed with English Language. It wasn't like GCSE at all. No emotion. All technical stuff about verbs, nouns and all these other weird words that no one cares about. The drop out rate is enormous for that subject! The plus side is the original writing aspect.

    English Literature isn't a heavy workload. You are required to read four texts in a year. A bit of sparknotes and you'll be fine. You need to know your texts well but this isn't a problem. If you are lucky to be in a class which is passionate about English expect lots of lovely debates, failing that, enjoy slogging through four books just to get that grade.
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    [QUOTE=Zoecb]Of course English Literature is harder. It's a proper A level, that's why it's valued. [QUOTE]

    Oh please! I do both Englit and Englang, as separate subjects. I go to a very good school. People have had more trouble with the lang syllabus, rather than finding the lit harder.

    Yes, lit is the more traditional subject. If you want to do lit at uni, then do lit at A level. BUT if lang is where your interest lies, don't be put off by people saying that it isn't a 'proper' A level. That would be restricting your choices and possibly diminishing the enjoyment that you could get from your studies.

    Lang also has the added bonus of creative writing. I did an article for a magazine (which I knocked off in an hour) and spent most of my time writing 6 poems for the second half. There really is a lot of freedom. In A level year you also do a language investigation for coursework. Anything from lonely hearts ads to papal speeches (I hope to do the latter). You look at lexis, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure, and there is actually a *lot* of material there. If you take englang seriously, you can come up with great investigations and learn a large amount.

    (p.s. I still love englit though)
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    I chose English Language because things like language change and the suchlike interest me. I'm going to be doing it at university too. I can understand why it wouldn't interest people, but that's not to say that you can't work hard and enjoy it. A lot of centres don't really teach Lang well, but my school was very good and taught it in a challenging and thought provoking way. Analysing adverts is a very simplistic teaching method, and merely the tip of the iceberg.


    Lit might be more repected, it might be harder. But I love English Language and find it fascinating.
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    (Original post by leannemann)
    Well in my school over 15 people got an A in Eng. Lit.
    Wow! I was the only one to get an A last year (for AS, awaiting A-levels now). And actually there werent even 15 people in my class.

    Imo eng lit is better. Lang looks dull dull dull.
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    Well Lit is more important than Lang, university-wise and if you do both only one is counted. So doesn't make much logistical sense to do both to me...
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    Just out of curiosity, how is lit more important than lang?
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    (Original post by Zoecb)
    if you do both only one is counted.


    Uh?

    Surely that would depend on the individual admissions dept?

    They must both be counted, given that my friend got five out of six offers with Lit and Lang as two seperate A Levels of her three.
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    Wow, it never ceases to amaze me just how many people pass judgement on a subject they blatantly know nothing about. :rolleyes:

    English Language isn't 'glorified media studies,' and it doesn't simply involve comparing adverts or saying 'this text has words like 'funky' which shows that the audience are teenagers'. :p: It involves the scientific analysis of texts using various language frameworks, which take real time and commitment to get your head around at the beginning of the course. It involves sociolinguistics, history and quite a bit of psychology - how language developed, how we acquire language as children, just how important social attitudes towards language are in our everyday lives. As an essay subject it teaches exactly the same skills as English Literature - how to write a precise and intelligent analytical essay.

    Judging the A level course on the GCSE is like saying 'oh I got an A in GCSE French - that must mean I'm fluent.' :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Zoecb)
    Well Lit is more important than Lang, university-wise and if you do both only one is counted. So doesn't make much logistical sense to do both to me...
    Is that true? Because all the places I have spoken to be have been quite happy to accept them both, since I'm applying for a degree in Lit, A Level language just seems to go with it quite nicely, as you can apply a lot of the skills to studying literature.
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    I think they mean that if you've only done Language, some places may not consider you for their English course, i.e. Warwick.
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    I hope we have established this.

    We can compare English Language to Core Maths, and English Literature to Further Maths.

    Dare you to do Literature.
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    Are we still arguing? Lit all the way!!!
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    (Original post by blah888)
    I hope we have established this.

    We can compare English Language to Core Maths, and English Literature to Further Maths.

    Dare you to do Literature.

    So those of us who chose to do Language because it looked more interesting to us are intellectually inferior to you then?

    Hm. :rolleyes:



    They're different subjects. At some schools they're not taught very well, with schools forcing teachers who really don't care to teach those who aren't so bright.

    But if it's taught well, and both teachers and students work hard (as was the case at my school), it can be very challenging and rewarding indeed. It inspired me enought to choose it for my degree course, anyway.
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    Just cause most university english departments ask for Literature does not necessarily mean language is easier or less prestigious - it's just that the former supposedly prepares you better and gives you the skills needed for a degree.

    If my school had offered the option, I would have done both.
 
 
 

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