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    http://www.snopes.com/college/exam/openbook.asp


    Legend: professor announces that the upcoming final examination is open-book and students may use "anything they can carry into the classroom." One student takes the instructor at his word and struggles into class hauling a graduate student on his back; the graduate student then proceeds to write the exam for him.

    .


    Origins: A sub-class of exam legends deals with students who don't technically cheat, but who seek to gain the upper hand by interpreting a professor's instructions literally despite knowing they are violating his intentions. This motif is also featured in the Barometer Problem legend.
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    (Original post by saiyamana)
    http://www.snopes.com/college/exam/openbook.asp


    Legend: professor announces that the upcoming final examination is open-book and students may use "anything they can carry into the classroom." One student takes the instructor at his word and struggles into class hauling a graduate student on his back; the graduate student then proceeds to write the exam for him.

    .


    Origins: A sub-class of exam legends deals with students who don't technically cheat, but who seek to gain the upper hand by interpreting a professor's instructions literally despite knowing they are violating his intentions. This motif is also featured in the Barometer Problem legend.
    lol hmmmm
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    The Jesus Lesson

    Students at a religious institute enrolled in a class on the life of Jesus arrive at their classroom to take the final exam and find a notice informing them that the test will be given in another building on the other side of the campus. As the students rush across campus to the new room, each is accosted by a homeless man asking for help. None of the students stop, anxious to arrive on time for the exam. The instructor is waiting for the students when they finally reach the classroom. He explains to them that the beggar was an actor, planted by him to test their reactions. Because the students demonstrated that they hadn't learned anything by studying the life of Jesus, they all failed the exam.

    The Stolen Exam

    A student stops by the office of one of his instructors and finds that the professor has stepped out for a moment, leaving an unguarded stack of the next day's final examinations on his desk. The student quickly steals one of the exams and disappears. Before issuing the exam, however, the professor counts them and notices that one is missing. He cuts one half-inch off the bottom of every exam prior to distributing them to the class, then fails the student who turns in a test paper longer than the rest.

    The Unsolvable Problems

    A student arrived late for math class and found two problems written on the chalkboard. Assuming they're homework problems, he jots them down in his notebook and works on the equations over the next few days before turning his solutions in to the instructor. Several weeks later, the professor turns up at the student's door with the student's work written up for publication. The two problems were not a homework assignment; they were problems previously thought to be unsolvable that the instructor had used as examples in his lecture that day.

    This is actually true, the young mathmatician was George B Dantzig of Stanford University when he was a student at University of California, Berkely.
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    hmmm...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by *starry_eyed_*)
    hmmm...:rolleyes:
    hmmmmm.....
    Go on you have a go.
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    The Message Under the Stamp

    During the war a soldier faithfully wrote his mother every week so she would know he was all right, until one week she didn't get a letter and immediately began to worry. Within a couple of weeks she got a letter from the Army saying that her son had been captured and was being held in a Prisoner-of-War camp, and they assured her that they had no reason to believe the American prisoners were being mistreated in any way. A few weeks later the woman finally received another letter from her son, it read: "Dear Mom, Try not to worry about me, they are treating us well and I'll be released as soon as the war is over. Make sure that little Teddy gets the stamp for his collection. Love you, Joe" The woman was overjoyed to hear the news, but was confused because she had no idea who "little Teddy" was. She decided to steam the stamp from the envelope and have a look. When she did she saw that written on the back of the stamp were the words: "They've cut off my legs".

    This may be one of the oldest Urban Legends in existence, it's been circulated during every war since the Civil War. It's ironic since POW camps didn't stamp their mail, being a government institution the mail was metered. It was especially popular during Vietnam, and the part of the body cut off varies.
 
 
 
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