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    I'm still awaiting my GCSE results, and I wanted to just ask if anyone knew how the universities look at the GCSE results..



    Do universities always look for the people who got A*s in everything? Because judging by the number of people on here who seem to have achieved 10A*s or more, I am feeling quite undermined, thinking that they will get all the top universities.

    I mean, if someone for example got mostly Bs, and a few As, and another person got A*s, As Bs and Cs, who would the university consider?

    Do any top unis accept people who do not have all A stars?
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    how many times has this been asked, i know you are a new member and all but just search those two words and you'll get loads of relevant threads.

    if ya think oxbridge goto

    www.oxbridge-admissions.org.uk and look at peoples profiles it'll tell ya that not everyone has an A*
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    GCSE results are looked at, but they're not as important as A-levels. As long as you have mostly Cs and above including English language and maths, that's all you need. A*s, As and Bs are a bonus, but not necessary except for the very top universities and the really competitive courses.
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    Focus on getting straight A's at AS and A2. That's the most important, and will get you your offers to good universities. GCSE's, while it is good to have excellent ones, does not guarantee or undermine your place, except for extremely competitive courses at extremely competitive universities. What are you planning to study at uni? Any ideas?
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    Law
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    (cries)
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    When applying to university, they will look at your AS/A-level grades (A-level predicted grades) more than GCSE (they will still look at them though). In addition, the personal statement and teacher's reference will also be taken into consideration too. It's not only grades.
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    does anyone with mainly Bs get into any good unis like city ?? help?
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    (Original post by Random one)
    does anyone with mainly Bs get into any good unis like city ?? help?
    you won't get into oxbridge without b's and above, no chance sorry. not to do law anyway. you could still get into a top 30 university quite comfortably however. don't be discouraged; put this behind you and redeem yourself at as/a-level. if you do not stop thinking about your gcses, the thoughts will hinder your performance at as/a-level, and like everyone else has said, universities will take your as/a-levels into higher consideration than gcses.

    EDIT: you also have to remember that places like cambridge and oxford have high entry requirements for a reason. if you achieve b's at gcse, you're probably going to struggle with the intensity and depth of work at oxbridge. only the best go to oxbridge, because only the best can cope. :rolleyes:
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    a mate of mine had 2 As 5Bs a C and a D and got into KCL for dentistry.

    this does not mean that everyone with such grades can get into a competitive course at a competitive uni, but it just shows that you can make up for "poor" GCSE grades.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    you won't get into oxbridge without b's and above, no chance sorry. not to do law anyway.
    While this may be true, it's not a very encouraging thing to say. Obviously for courses like law at universities like Oxbridge, the majority of successful applicants have a lot of A*s and As, but some have Cs. If this person gets straight As at A-level with very high module scores at AS, does exceptionally well on the LNAT and has outstanding interviews, submitted work and reference, who's to say they won't get an offer? In fact, 2/115 students got offers from Sidney Sussex college, Cambridge last year depsite being in the bottom 30% on paper, so while it is very rare, it does happen.

    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    EDIT: you also have to remember that places like cambridge and oxford have high entry requirements for a reason. if you achieve b's at gcse, you're probably going to struggle with the intensity and depth of work at oxbridge. only the best go to oxbridge, because only the best can cope. :rolleyes
    Not necessarily. At GCSE you're juggling 10 or more subjects, some of which you won't be very good at, you may be badly taught and stuck in classes with students of much lower ability than you or may not work very hard because you don't realise their importance. At Oxbridge, or any top university, none of the above would be true.
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    It's interesting that people say AS level results are taken more seriously into consideration than GCSEs. People keep telling me that GCSEs are more important at top universities because virtually everyone applying is predicted straight As at A2. I suppose this is a different thing to actual AS marks though... So if you're applying for one of the most competitive courses and have mostly A*s and As, but are still under average for top uni applicants (I worked out that Cambridge would give me 6.8/10 for mine) can you make up for this with high AS UMS marks?

    So although most applicants are predicted As and A2, are there less who actually get impressively high marks the first time around at AS? Anyone got any ideas how many get 280+? Wow tis all so complicated
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    (Original post by *Bethany*)
    It's interesting that people say AS level results are taken more seriously into consideration than GCSEs. People keep telling me that GCSEs are more important at top universities because virtually everyone applying is predicted straight As at A2. I suppose this is a different thing to actual AS marks though... So if you're applying for one of the most competitive courses and have mostly A*s and As, but are still under average for top uni applicants (I worked out that Cambridge would give me 6.8/10 for mine) can you make up for this with high AS UMS marks?

    So although most applicants are predicted As and A2, are there less who actually get impressively high marks the first time around at AS? Anyone got any ideas how many get 280+? Wow tis all so complicated
    At the Cambridge open day on Thursday, the admissions tutor at Sidney Sussex went into how they assess applicants in a fair bit of detail. Basically, what happens is all your academic information (GCSE and AS grades and predicted A2 grades) is entered onto a big databse. For GCSE results, all your A*s and As count, so it's not out of 10 because someone with 13 A*s would get 13 points. They then send you a questionnaire asking for the module results of every AS unit you've taken, which I guess is where those who are planning to resit come unstuck. The admissions tutor said that if you're averaging high 80s for your ASs, you'll be in the top 2/3 of applicants. They sort references in bands of 1 to 5, where most people get 3/4 and 5 is absolutely exceptional. So they have a pretty detialed rank order of applicants before they even call you for interview. Then each interview is marked on a scale of 1 to 10 and added to their information together with the results of any written tests or submitted work.

    As an overview of all that, if you get high UMS marks at AS, it will help to make up for your GCSE results, although I think you should get some points added on because you were ill. My points from my GCSEs add up to 4.3 but I worked out that I should get 2.7 added on because of my school, which will give me 7. Illness is just as much of a handicap as a not so good school, so I think they should have a system in place to deal with that.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    At the Cambridge open day on Thursday, the admissions tutor at Sidney Sussex went into how they assess applicants in a fair bit of detail. Basically, what happens is all your academic information (GCSE and AS grades and predicted A2 grades) is entered onto a big databse. For GCSE results, all your A*s and As count, so it's not out of 10 because someone with 13 A*s would get 13 points. They then send you a questionnaire asking for the module results of every AS unit you've taken, which I guess is where those who are planning to resit come unstuck. The admissions tutor said that if you're averaging high 80s for your ASs, you'll be in the top 2/3 of applicants. They sort references in bands of 1 to 5, where most people get 3/4 and 5 is absolutely exceptional. So they have a pretty detialed rank order of applicants before they even call you for interview. Then each interview is marked on a scale of 1 to 10 and added to their information together with the results of any written tests or submitted work.

    As an overview of all that, if you get high UMS marks at AS, it will help to make up for your GCSE results, although I think you should get some points added on because you were ill. My points from my GCSEs add up to 4.3 but I worked out that I should get 2.7 added on because of my school, which will give me 7. Illness is just as much of a handicap as a not so good school, so I think they should have a system in place to deal with that.
    Was that Richard Partington? He came to talk at our college, he's so nice ! Wow that's quite good! Although I the only one I can reasonably expect to get 280+ in in English I suppose; although *theoretically* it would be possible in all 4- I just really don't get the feeling I did from the exams!

    Oh right, I've got 6.8 out of 13+ then.. :eek: lol!! You'll get a higher GCSE score than mine then I wonder if they do add on points for illness; they don't say so. I'd just be happy if they bothered to take notice of it tbh - I bet there are people who make it up thereby making things harder for the rest of us :rolleyes:

    You looking forward to the holiday? I'll be glad to have a break for sure.
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    (Original post by *Bethany*)
    Was that Richard Partington? He came to talk at our college, he's so nice ! Wow that's quite good! Although I the only one I can reasonably expect to get 280+ in in English I suppose; although *theoretically* it would be possible in all 4- I just really don't get the feeling I did from the exams!

    Oh right, I've got 6.8 out of 13+ then.. :eek: lol!! You'll get a higher GCSE score than mine then I wonder if they do add on points for illness; they don't say so. I'd just be happy if they bothered to take notice of it tbh - I bet there are people who make it up thereby making things harder for the rest of us :rolleyes:

    You looking forward to the holiday? I'll be glad to have a break for sure.
    Yeah, it was Richard. I thought he was really nice too, and he told us loads of funny stories about people who completely messed up their interviews, like someone applying for SPS who didn't know there'd been a General Election!!! :rofl: :eek: I'm hoping for 280+ in sociology since my coursework was 55/60 and I was getting 54, 55 and 56/60 in mocks, but I doubt I'll get it in anything else. French would be great, but apparently it's really rare to get higher than 260 in that

    I just thought of something; could you apply through CSAS? They say you're eligible if your schooling has been disrupted through illness, but I don't know how long-term they mean. It might have to be something life-threatening like cancer or something that's still happening now. Their access scheme is so vague! You're also eligible if very few people from your family and school/college have gone on to HE, but I don't know how few they mean; not that many people from my school go, but I wouldn't say it was 'very few.'

    I get pretty bored in holidays actually, but I have a lot of reading and stuff to do in case I apply to Cambridge and get an interview, plus I need to choose my unis! What do you have planned? When do you break up? For me it's the 22nd, so another 2 weeks to go yet.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    While this may be true, it's not a very encouraging thing to say. Obviously for courses like law at universities like Oxbridge, the majority of successful applicants have a lot of A*s and As, but some have Cs. If this person gets straight As at A-level with very high module scores at AS, does exceptionally well on the LNAT and has outstanding interviews, submitted work and reference, who's to say they won't get an offer? In fact, 2/115 students got offers from Sidney Sussex college, Cambridge last year depsite being in the bottom 30% on paper, so while it is very rare, it does happen.
    you criticise me for not giving him encouragement yet you think it's ok to lure him into a false pretense by saying he can still do law at oxbridge? i appreiciate and respect what you are trying to do; although it's not exactly the best thing to be doing, i.e. giving him wrongful hopes. i also enjoy how you use the word if when you talk about the prospect of him being able to do law at oxbridge. i'm sorry but if someone has those gcse grades, whether they have worked hard or not, i doubt they have the intellectual calibre to achieve what you suggest is possible. i don't agree in giving people false hope.


    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Not necessarily. At GCSE you're juggling 10 or more subjects, some of which you won't be very good at, you may be badly taught and stuck in classes with students of much lower ability than you or may not work very hard because you don't realise their importance. At Oxbridge, or any top university, none of the above would be true.
    erm, i highly doubt oxbridge will be sympathetic to whether he/she realised the importance of gcse or not. oxbridge get offers from candidates with straight A* at gcse, straight A's at a-level, and many have merits and AEA passes. why would oxbridge choose this guy who has achieved b's at gcse, got straight A's at a-level, over a student who has achieved straight A* at gcse, and achieved straight A's at a-level (plus merits)? no matter what argument you have for this, it won't happen. personal statements and work experience are important yes, but some people are being slightly naive here by saying personal statements makeup massively for gcse grades. they don't.
    places like oxbridge need proof that you are a capable student, and are someone who will make best use of their facilities. so what if the person in question achieves straight A's at a-level - if it comes down to a choice the university have to make, they will refer to gcse grades. and places like oxbridge, nearly always refer to gcses because there is such competition. your argument stands good steed for a university such as Bristol or Bath. but oxbridge? no way.
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    Kellywood I found your post interesting, what GCSE results did you get btw? I got 5 C's amd 4's, it wasn't a problem at all, they were only really concerned with my AVCE results.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Kellywood I found your post interesting, what GCSE results did you get btw? I got 5 C's amd 4's, it wasn't a problem at all, they were only really concerned with my AVCE results.
    it says in her signature: GCSEs: English (A), English lit (A), maths (B), science (AA), French (A*), food technology (B), history (A), media studies (B), short course RS (A)
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    you criticise me for not giving him encouragement yet you think it's ok to lure him into a false pretense by saying he can still do law at oxbridge? i appreiciate and respect what you are trying to do; although it's not exactly the best thing to be doing, i.e. giving him wrongful hopes. i also enjoy how you use the word if when you talk about the prospect of him being able to do law at oxbridge. i'm sorry but if someone has those gcse grades, whether they have worked hard or not, i doubt they have the intellectual calibre to achieve what you suggest is possible. i don't agree in giving people false hope.
    I don't think it's luring him into a false pretence. I never said 'you'll definitely get in, don't worry' or anything like that, I just said it was possible, and if you'd bothered to read my last post properly, you'd have noticed that I said it's extremely rare. Also, it is possible to get Bs at GCSE because you hated and weren't very good at some of the subjects you had to do or because you had crap teachers; it doesn't automatically mean you're not capable of studying one subject you may be very good at when taught by experts.

    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    erm, i highly doubt oxbridge will be sympathetic to whether he/she realised the importance of gcse or not. oxbridge get offers from candidates with straight A* at gcse, straight A's at a-level, and many have merits and AEA passes. why would oxbridge choose this guy who has achieved b's at gcse, got straight A's at a-level, over a student who has achieved straight A* at gcse, and achieved straight A's at a-level (plus merits)? no matter what argument you have for this, it won't happen. personal statements and work experience are important yes, but some people are being slightly naive here by saying personal statements makeup massively for gcse grades. they don't.
    places like oxbridge need proof that you are a capable student, and are someone who will make best use of their facilities. so what if the person in question achieves straight A's at a-level - if it comes down to a choice the university have to make, they will refer to gcse grades. and places like oxbridge, nearly always refer to gcses because there is such competition. your argument stands good steed for a university such as Bristol or Bath. but oxbridge? no way.
    As I said before, not working hard enough is only one reason for getting Bs at GCSE and of course Oxbridge aren't sympathetic to that, nor should they be, but they are sympathetic to other things, for example, poor teaching. I'm not disagreeing with you that it's unlikely for someone with straight A*s at GCSE and straight As at A-level to be rejected in favour of someone with worse GCSE results, but it does happen, especially if the latter candidate was far better at interviews.
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    Does it look bad to oxbridge or any other top unis if you have a few Grade C's at gcse?
 
 
 

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