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    Ms, Miss or Mrs?!

    I know this might seem a bit dumb to some people, but I'm writing a cover letter for my CV and don't know whether to adress it to the person's full name (ie Joe Salt) or Ms Salt, Miss Salt, or Mrs Salt. Can anyone help out? Cheers.
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    If you know their title, then use it, otherwise put Ms.
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    I don't know their title, so I'll us Ms. Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by Tatty)
    Ms, Miss or Mrs?!
    and the difference being.....
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    Well, I always thought:

    Miss = Single
    Mrs = Married
    Ms = Divorced or not known whether Miss or Mrs

    But I could be wrong, so I was checking whether to us Ms or something.
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    (Original post by Tatty)
    Ms = Divorced or not known whether Miss or Mrs
    women can also choose to use Ms.. say, if they think their marital status is rather irrelevant to how they're addressed! :rolleyes: :p:
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    And that, too ^_^
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    Ms. is a modern, feminist invention. Previously, Mrs. denoted married status (included widowed), while Miss. was unmarried or, later, divorced. Ms. is in response to the decrease in use of Master (the male equivalent of Miss.): it was deemed unfair to describe women only by their relationship with men. I use Ms., because as a feminist I feel that it's only fair, however some people prefer Miss. or Mrs.. So use whatever she does, or else Ms..
    The fullstops (after Mr., Miss., etc.) are there because these are abbreviations.
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    The fullstops are American
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    No they're not.
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    Whatever they are, they're unnecessary - Mr and Mrs are fine without full stops, and Miss and Ms aren't abbreviations so wouldn't need full stops anyway.
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    In correct English, abbreviations require a following full stop to show that they are abbreviations. Those words all abbreviations, the only possible exception being Ms., but I would argue that it too is an abbreviation of 'Mistress' (as are Mrs. and Miss.), hence its similarity to the other words.
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    ms is the modern way of saying mrs, i think. :confused:
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    No, it's not. Read the thread.
 
 
 
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