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    I wouldn't assume that because you've done French, you'll pick Spanish up extremely quickly. The vocab is totally different as is pronunciation etc. Grammas is hard to grasp because of subtle differences. But that's what my course in Italian should be like: a tutor, tapes, books etc.

    BUT If you're genuinally good at languages, you should be able to learn a chunk of vocab without any problems so you might as well give it ago if it's worth the money.
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    (Original post by leannemann)
    I wouldn't assume that because you've done French, you'll pick Spanish up extremely quickly. The vocab is totally different as is pronunciation etc. Grammas is hard to grasp because of subtle differences. But that's what my course in Italian should be like: a tutor, tapes, books etc.
    I know I won't pick it up very quickly and it will be hard work, I just meant that it should be easier to learn having done French than it would be otherwise because there are some similarities and everyone I've spoken to has told me that Spanish is easier than French.
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    I can't remember which was harder. Spanish listening was ridiculously hard last year. If you take an easy exam board it shouldn't be too bad, but our school has a policy of picking the boards it thinks are hardest. I got full marks for 3 of my Spanish modules but did craply in comparison in the listening. But they had lots of complaints about it. Practise makes perfect!
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    i agree with what someone else said earlier.. don't bother with the GCSE and go to spain. you will learn loads at an intensive langauge course and you will have the chance to combine it with a holiday and get a chance to practice. while its not cheap its defiantely worth it. the cheapest places ive found in this country were calendonia languages, although its probably a lot cheaper booking it out there but thats far harder.

    to be honest, i thinka gcse will be a waste of time as you will learn quite a lot of irrelevant rubbish. at uni, ab initio langauges focus on intensive grammar. i did portuguese from scratch and you very quickly get a grasp of the grammar but don't necessarily develop the vocabularly skilks to comunicate (they assume that will come with the year abroad). Within a year my grammar was better than my other language that i had been doing for 6 years.

    my tips would be to go abroad but if you can't afford that you would be better listening to spanish radio, reading spanish websites (the bbc is quite good because it has sections for beginners that take chunks of articles and translates or explains bits). Also buy a good grammer book and start learning verbs and grammar rules. that will give you an advantage when you take the course and you won't have to worry about learning random vocab such as items from a garage that you will probably never come across at uni.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    That sounds really good Do you by any chance have a link to the website for OLCI?
    sure..... www.olci.info I think it says it's £275 on the site but when I ordered it online there was a discount.
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    (Original post by garethDT)
    sure..... www.olci.info I think it says it's £275 on the site but when I ordered it online there was a discount.
    Thanks Well, I had a chat with my French teacher (who also speaks Spanish, German and Italian, and obviously English! :eek: ) about it today and she said she'll have a look at the details to see what she thinks. I have to go and see her again tomorrow, but she said she'd be willing to work with me on it after school once a week just to practice speaking etc, which would be really good.
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    (Original post by leannemann)
    but our school has a policy of picking the boards it thinks are hardest
    Why would they deliberately choose the hardest exam boards? :confused:
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    because they think it's good preparation for studying it at the next level...
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    (Original post by leannemann)
    because they think it's good preparation for studying it at the next level...
    Yeah, I guess it is, but then not everyone will want to study it at a higher level, and surely they'd be more interested in getting the best possible results? I didn't think there were 'easy' and 'hard' exam boards anyway, I thought they were supposed to be the same level of difficulty?
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    But it's either or in this case, and universities favour some exam boards as well so i guess they might look at that. They want the best possible results but reputation comes into it as well.
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    to be honest i don't think the uni;s have the time to differentiate on the basis of what board was used at GCSE. Whatever yu do, a GCSE in a language you want to take from scratch will look good for your application but so will period abroad or time spent wisely following a grammar book that they will use in the first year. As i've said before doing a GCSE will be totally different to how they will teach you at university. The only real advantage you will gain from it, is that it will be concrete proof that you have been trying to learn the language. When i posted before, i didn't realise that you still had to apply but i still think you will make more progress on a 2 week language course aborad than you would on a GCSE course.
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    (Original post by emom100)
    When i posted before, i didn't realise that you still had to apply but i still think you will make more progress on a 2 week language course aborad than you would on a GCSE course.
    Maybe so, but I imagine a flight to Spain, somewhere to stay, food etc, plus a 2-week language course costs much more than the £250 I'd have to pay for a distance learning GCSE course! I wouldn't want to go to a foreign country on my own anyway Basically my analysis is this:

    Pros: It would impress universities, especially since I've only ever done French, and I'd have a pretty good start when I went to university, so the first part of the course would be merely gentle revision rather than frantic learning to ease me into it.

    Cons: It would be a lot of work on top of 4 A2s, it would be harder than doing it with a class and a teacher and it's expensive.
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    If you decide to go down the teaching yourself route I definitely recommend 'Suenos' which is a pack of tapes/cds and a book put together by the BBC. It's really for adults wanting to learn Spanish so it's not at all patronising and teaches you stuff that will be more useful when you go to Spain/ South America than the standard GCSE. (Sorry- I sound like I'm trying to sell it!!) I did Spanish GCSE this year in about 9 months with a tutor (me and my friend did it together) and I went to some classes at school put on for sixth formers wanting to do the GCSE as an extra thing (there were only three of us.) Also, I was lucky to have two native spanish speakers in my year who I could talk to? Do you know people in or outside of school who are Spanish or who speak it? Otherwise I think I would go with the GCSE- it's well respected and nationally accepted and acknowledged. Good luck
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    (Original post by emilie87)
    If you decide to go down the teaching yourself route I definitely recommend 'Suenos' which is a pack of tapes/cds and a book put together by the BBC. It's really for adults wanting to learn Spanish so it's not at all patronising and teaches you stuff that will be more useful when you go to Spain/ South America than the standard GCSE. (Sorry- I sound like I'm trying to sell it!!) I did Spanish GCSE this year in about 9 months with a tutor (me and my friend did it together) and I went to some classes at school put on for sixth formers wanting to do the GCSE as an extra thing (there were only three of us.) Also, I was lucky to have two native spanish speakers in my year who I could talk to? Do you know people in or outside of school who are Spanish or who speak it? Otherwise I think I would go with the GCSE- it's well respected and nationally accepted and acknowledged. Good luck
    Yep, I think I've decided on the GCSE. It's a distance learning course, so I'll be doing it on my own over the Internet with a personal tutor to mark my assignments, but the good thing is my French teacher speaks Spanish and she's offered to meet me once a week or so just to practice speaking, which is the only thing I was a bit worried about
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    Did you choose OLCI? you might end up having the same tutor as me lol!

    The course is very much based on speaking and listening and my accent is improving and I can speak it quite quickly now, hopefully I'll get a chance to use some when I go to Spain on Friday, I doubt I'll be able to understand the famous incomprehensible Andalucian accent though!
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    It's a shame there's nowhere near you that accepts people under 18 as all the colleges around me do and seeing as your school doesn't offer it you have every right to go somewhere else and get taught for free. I'm sure it just can't be a college near me that pays for distance learning. I'm not doing Italian by distance learning it would seem...I'm teaching myself which is interesting!
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    (Original post by leannemann)
    It's a shame there's nowhere near you that accepts people under 18 as all the colleges around me do and seeing as your school doesn't offer it you have every right to go somewhere else and get taught for free. I'm sure it just can't be a college near me that pays for distance learning. I'm not doing Italian by distance learning it would seem...I'm teaching myself which is interesting!
    :eek: Good luck with that! How will you practice for the oral exam? That part's hard enough by distance learning!
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Yep, I think I've decided on the GCSE. It's a distance learning course, so I'll be doing it on my own over the Internet with a personal tutor to mark my assignments, but the good thing is my French teacher speaks Spanish and she's offered to meet me once a week or so just to practice speaking, which is the only thing I was a bit worried about
    thats really good that you've got the support at school for the speaking, good luck with it all.

    oh just as an aside, heres the grammar book that weve been using at uni. it goes from the basics to the advanced stuff (at least advanced enough for the 2nd year) and has been ,much more useful than the other grammar books that i've ever used. i'd really reccomend getting to grips with the grammar side before you go to uni (and it wont harm your gcse either), it'll make your life so much easier when you get there (especially if you can get the subjuntive at least vaguely sorted out in your head before you go)

    "A spanish learning Grammar" Pilar Muñoz and Mike Thacker
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    (Original post by emom100)
    thats really good that you've got the support at school for the speaking, good luck with it all.

    oh just as an aside, heres the grammar book that weve been using at uni. it goes from the basics to the advanced stuff (at least advanced enough for the 2nd year) and has been ,much more useful than the other grammar books that i've ever used. i'd really reccomend getting to grips with the grammar side before you go to uni (and it wont harm your gcse either), it'll make your life so much easier when you get there (especially if you can get the subjuntive at least vaguely sorted out in your head before you go)

    "A spanish learning Grammar" Pilar Muñoz and Mike Thacker
    Thanks for that, I'll put it on my list. I need to get a Spanish dictionary anyway
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    Not really sure about the speaking, it depends where I take the exam. If you can write in the language, speaking's not really that difficult, your grammar has to be pretty good but I don't need a grade in it and it won't be included in any offers so it's not too important. Hopefully I'll be able to do it by distance learning. if not teachers in my school speak Italian and I know that there is one who will be very happy to help (she's already given me the specimen papers etc.) Learning by yourself is something you have to get used to anyway so it's all good experience. Portuguese is my next target! lol
 
 
 
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