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    Hi,
    I came across this today and wanted to know what you boys and girls think about this, I am particularly keen to hear from people from religious backgrounds who can challenge David Attenborough 's argument.

    My response is that when Creationists talk about God creating every individual species as a separate act, they always instance hummingbirds, or orchids, sunflowers and beautiful things. But I tend to think instead of a parasitic worm that is boring through the eye of a boy sitting on the bank of a river in West Africa, [a worm] that's going to make him blind. And [I ask them], 'Are you telling me that the God you believe in, who you also say is an all-merciful God, who cares for each one of us individually, are you saying that God created this worm that can live in no other way than in an innocent child's eyeball? Because that doesn't seem to me to coincide with a God who's full of mercy'.
    Sir David Attenborough
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    Interesting. Doesn't have all the usual 'problem of evil' get-outs for the religious ones.
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    If you want to hear a theists justification, you can find a few here

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/t126537.html

    Not particularly compelling responces in my opinion
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    (Original post by kizdesai)
    If you want to hear a theists justification, you can find a few here

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/t126537.html

    Not particularly compelling responces in my opinion
    There are plenty of other threads that deal with the issue, you just might have to dig a bit to find them.
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    We evolved from plankton. In fact, everything did.
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    (Original post by Lauren)
    We evolved from plankton. In fact, everything did.
    Plankton? :eek: i thought we evolved from monkeys?
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    (Original post by Lauren)
    We evolved from plankton. In fact, everything did.
    It's depressing to think I was once a plankton sperm.
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    (Original post by Douglas)
    It's depressing to think I was once a plankton sperm.
    Now I know where you get it.
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    (Original post by HammaL)
    i thought we evolved from monkeys?
    That is a common misconception about evolution...
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    well the response would be that after the fall of man the entier creation was cursed and hence is not the beautiful wonderful world it was intended to be.

    There is lovely imagry somewhere in the new testement (i think revelations but im probably wrong) that in heaven the lions will graze with the deers. Im imagining the eyeball parasite too had a different origional propose.
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    (Original post by HammaL)
    Plankton? :eek: i thought we evolved from monkeys?
    No we had a common ancestor.
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    (Original post by HammaL)
    Plankton? :eek: i thought we evolved from monkeys?
    No, we evolved from the little fuzzy creatures that survived the KT boundary. But everything evolved from plankton, although life started around 3.2Ga so it's not like you can see any resemblence!
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    The Big Bang and evolution theory seems to have rather a lot of evidence going for it, but that does not necessarily contradict theism altogether. If, in the beginning something exploded, one has to ask what put it there in the first place.

    Therefore, one may be able to see that there may be some credible basis for creationism (that our creation was through some higher power, perhaps or perhaps not an omnipotent God), even if not necessarily in the form laid out in Genesis. It could be seen that the passages are not literal depictions as much as they are metaphorical. I doubt, however, that many people, short of extreme religious fundamentalists, could still cling to the view that God created us as man and woman and the world in seven days.
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    (Original post by little.rebel.L)
    There is lovely imagry somewhere in the new testement (i think revelations but im probably wrong) that in heaven the lions will graze with the deers. Im imagining the eyeball parasite too had a different origional propose.
    Lions grazing with deers?

    you mean lions will eat grass in heaven?

    If evolution is correct, theyll be lions with pathetic grinding teeth...
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    I don't think creationist views stand in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence. I agree with the the view that the bible may be metaphorical but definitely does not hold water that man were made as we were. From the various fossilised evidence I think we can be quite certain that evolutionary processes resulted in the modern human. When did ancestors of men first became bipedal?
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    Would a loving God create chavs?
    Suck on that the religious right.
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    A funny thing I thought one late, drunk night. If man evolved from single-celled organisms, then who the hell invented the eyeball?

    I mean, it's not like an animal will be created with a one of them fully installed: it'd be one hell of a mutation, put it that way. But at the same time, why would an animal with a quarter/half an eyeball survive and reproduce more than any other? Don't take this seriously, though, I wasn't really thinking straight at the time.
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    (Original post by Douglas)
    It's depressing to think I was once a plankton sperm.
    the chance that you were is very small..
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    (Original post by 2 + 2 = 5)
    A funny thing I thought one late, drunk night. If man evolved from single-celled organisms, then who the hell invented the eyeball?

    I mean, it's not like an animal will be created with a one of them fully installed: it'd be one hell of a mutation, put it that way. But at the same time, why would an animal with a quarter/half an eyeball survive and reproduce more than any other? Don't take this seriously, though, I wasn't really thinking straight at the time.
    It probably started with photoreceptors. Maybe being phototactic had increased survival opportunities with the start of photosynthesis. So maybe early zooplankton like organisms were phototactic so they could move to regions of high light intensity to eat the phytoplanktons. Maybe eyes have had a evolutionary advantage.
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    (Original post by 2 + 2 = 5)
    A funny thing I thought one late, drunk night. If man evolved from single-celled organisms, then who the hell invented the eyeball?

    I mean, it's not like an animal will be created with a one of them fully installed: it'd be one hell of a mutation, put it that way. But at the same time, why would an animal with a quarter/half an eyeball survive and reproduce more than any other? Don't take this seriously, though, I wasn't really thinking straight at the time.
    Trilobites were apparently the first things to develop eyes, though they were not so much eyes as we know them now but merely photosensitive pits. Still, crude though they may, that gave them the rather unique (at the time) ability to see prey, something which opened up a whole new realm of hunting advantages and started an evolutionary arms race of vision.
 
 
 

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