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    Hi. This is my first post in this forums.
    I'm from Sweden so please forgive my grammar, spelling and the little knowledge I have about the British educational system.

    I have a few questions about the working market in the rest of europe and mostly Britain.

    I have decided to not go to a Swedish university because it really sucks here, the only good thing is that it's free.
    And now I have a little dilemma, should I study engineering or finance? And since im not going to continue working in Sweden (oh, the country really s ucks) im going to ask my questions here.

    How is the market for people with financial educations (economists, investment-bankers, brokers, analysts etc.) Do they make alot of money and become successful or is it like Sweden. Here the country is >>full<< of economists and they all get low income jobs and end up working in small banks as advisors for normal people unless they go to the only good university there is. Is it like that in Britain to? Do you have to go to a prestigueful university to get a well paying job? And do you have to get a postgraduate degree (MSc, M, MBA) to do well?

    Then we come to the second question, how is the finance jobs compared to the engineering sector? Do engineers usually get better jobs and higher posts in companies? Because as I know it If you go in a little "*****ier" university and study engineering you can get a better job than if you would study economy in that "bad" university, true?

    And my last question that you probably will think is really silly but I have wondered this for a really long time. I have seen this in lots of tv-shows and commericals. What job do the people have that work in those big office landscapes. You know when they have a computer and those plastic walls.

    Haha damn it got really long but I would really appreciate if someone could answer all my questions and write their own comments about engineering vs. finance.

    EDIT: And by the way the MBA was designed for Engineers learning business managment, so engineers can have some economical expertise as well, but in finance there isn't a fast way to gain some technical knowledge.. Although the MBA for engineers doesn't give them a deep economical knowledge.
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    Engineers usually have the highest started salary apart from the medical professions,
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/pdfs/graduates.pdf though economics isn't that far behind.
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    but they can't find that many jobs and pay maturation isn't as good
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    but they can't find that many jobs and pay maturation isn't as good
    Who? Economists or Engineers?
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    haha the people in the engineer forum say that engineers are "better" and in the economics forum it's vice versa
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    there is very little demand for jobs in the uk atleast for engineers and the pay is nothing to write home about.

    econ graduates that go into banking and finance start off quite well even though they must work hard for the first 5-10 years but after that roll on yachts, luxury mansions, and weekends in the seychelles

    and when was the last time you heard of an engineer doing all those things?
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    (Original post by ramroff)
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    Bullcrap. Engineering is one of the most employable degrees.
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    there is very little demand for jobs in the uk atleast for engineers
    That is completely untrue. There's a *massive* shortage of engineers, and they reckon there'll be even more demand over the next few years as a lot of practicing Engineers are approaching retirement.
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    do not mislead the swede.
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    I'm not. Plus, if he does decide he wants to work in Finance, he can go into it with an Engineering degree. He couldn't go into Engineering with an Economics degree.
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    however, if an employer sees two candidates from the same uni, one with an econ degree and the other with an engineering degree, more likely than not he will pick the former.
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    however, if an employer sees two candidates from the same uni, one with an econ degree and the other with an engineering degree, more likely than not he will pick the former.
    Not necessarily, it entirely depends on the candidates and you can't assume like that. Also, read these - I found it quite them quite interesting
    http://www.workthing.com/career-advi...or_survey.html
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4105220.stm
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    ignore ramroff dude....he's just a disillusioned nob who thinks he will one day walk into an IB and the owners will welcome him with open arms and a complimentary yacht just because he has a 2:1 from a good uni...which ofcourse no one else has...:laugh:
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    i never once said that.
 
 
 
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