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    Hi!
    I'm new to the forum scene so sorry if I should have posted this under an existing thread, but I thought I should start a new one because looking through the forum there seems to be loads of people with giving great advice!
    Ok this is going to be one long post with many questions so bare with me here................

    Let me introduce myself I'm an Economics student at the University of Manchester, I will be starting my second year this coming september and once I graduate after my third year I want to go on and do a Masters at a University with a better reputation and department in the subject so I can launch into a good career. However I am very worried that my chances of being able to do this are not very good, mainly because I am not a BA course.

    Now time for the background story including 2 course changes (did warn you this was a long story), when I finished my A-Levels I originally went to Nottingham to study Physics, however I quickly realised a Physics course for the next 3 years was not for me. I wanted to switch to Economics BSc there but because of a mess up with Admissions they had over 100 too many students on it and could only offer me Economics with Chinese Studies the following year . So I dropped out and decided to reapply through UCAS, I also got work experience in the City for 3 months at a big American Bank working on foreign exchange trading floor.
    I was recommended BA in IBFE at the University of Manchester (IBFE = International Business Finance and Economics). However once again I did not like the course! (yes I am a moron at picking degree courses) The complusory modules in Sociology and Accounting were the worst. But I could not afford to drop out again so I stuck with the course and I have just finished my first year in it. I wanted to switch to BSc in Economics but because of one module difference between the course I was not allowed to, instead I will be going into BA in Economics (I don't have to take Sociology or Accounting) as a Second Year student (not going back a year again!).

    The Economics teaching however at Manchester is a bit of a joke, unlike at Nottingham where trained lecturers tutor you and track your progress in small groups, at Manchester you are tutored in large packs by postgraduate students who would prefer to teach it all in Chinese (don't mean to be rude). This is my first worry, I will need references in my applications to do a good Masters, however there is no personal touch at Manchester lecturers and students do not interact, it is basically mass production teaching, so even if I work insanely hard there will be noone to note that and thus give me a good reference.

    My wish list of places to take are Masters would include: Warwick, Oxford, Bristol, Imperial, Nottingham and LSE (yes pasrt of my plan does include locking myself in the library and going for a 1st). I have spoken to Warwick and they do not mind that I am doing a BA as supposed to a BSc, they say they look at the modules you have taken. I am hoping this will be good for me as I have taken all the Advanced Mathematics and Statistics modules and my current module choices for the year coming are: Microeconomics 2A, Microeconomics 2B, Macroeconomics 2A, Macroeconomics 2B, Mathematical Economics 1, Basic Econometrics, Operational Research, Managerial Economics. I may adjust these slightly to include a little finance as I want to leave open the chance to do an Economics and Finance masters such as msc financial economics at oxford :rolleyes:

    So thats my really long post, any advice anyone has on what I should be doing if I really want to get onto a Masters at one of the above univeristies would really help because I've obsessed over making the wrong choices way too much and I know it doesn't help in the slightest
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    I've heard good things about Manchester's teaching so I wouldn't be too hard on them until you have properly started your 2nd year there. The main difference between BA and BSc is clearly the maths and statistics.

    If you have already spoken to Warwick I suggest you speak to the other Unis and work out your real options, explain the situation fully to them. Try and do as much Maths and stats as you can at Manchester to get yourself used to the methods that you will need to use in your MSc.

    I have heard that some places do introductory maths for MScs before the really start to get everyone up to speed so ask Unis about that aswell.

    If you are worried about making the wrong choices maybe you should have a year out working or a post-undergraduate degree gap year? There are lots of placements available for work after an undergraduate degree in Economic/Banking/Finance related fields and you seem very determined to do well so you have that on your side!

    You are the only person that can decide your future, but take as much advice as you can from friends, family, and people from universities.
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    Im not sure how relevant this whole BA thing vs Bsc thing is, you might be working yourself up too much about it.


    For example Cambridge economics is a BA and is one of the most mathematical in the country but then again you get a BA for maths there as well.

    If you want to do a good masters do well in your exams, write a good application and get a good reference...not that much different when origanally applying for your undergrad degree through UCAS
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    (Original post by observer)
    Im not sure how relevant this whole BA thing vs Bsc thing is, you might be working yourself up too much about it.


    For example Cambridge economics is a BA and is one of the most mathematical in the country but then again you get a BA for maths there as well.

    If you want to do a good masters do well in your exams, write a good application and get a good reference...not that much different when origanally applying for your undergrad degree through UCAS
    Cambridge is an exception but mostly you'll find BSc's more desirable to employers than BA's
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    i was worried about the difference between BA and BSc so asked my economics teacher and he said there wasnt any
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    BA BSc strictly pretty much the same thing. but some employers are biased in favouring of BSc thinking its more of a science based degree.

    i just graduated from manchester with an BA in Economics and im supposed that i know what you mean by the loose contact with your tutor. you are better off seeking advice from you personal tutor to whom you are allocated since your first year. they are about the only person you can get real close to. then there are also some lecturers willing to help,tho not all. just whoever you think you stand a chance building up the relationship with, i'd say work on it.

    you are only in your first year. LSE/Cambridge prefer students with high maths skills.
    they like people who take majority of maths modules and score all 1st class.
    i know a girl in my course. she isnt strong at essay-based exams but is top at maths.
    so she took a lot of stats/maths modules and had a 1st class on her degree.
    she's going to do MSc finance in cambridge this year.

    from what i see it,theres no other more useful advice
    take a lot of maths and Ace them will increase your chance.
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    Concentrate on getting a first - with that you should be able to explain the issues and get onto one of your preferred courses.
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    Thanks all three of you I've come to realise you're all right and am ignoring the Royal Holloway guy.

    Graduate_kc you graduated from BA Econ at Manchester? Cool, what are you up to now? I think my personal tutor changes as I switched from IBFE to specialise in Economics and I hope he does change as the one I had this year was useless.

    I am going to put all my effort into gaining a first, going to try and live in the library as it beats my new damp ridden house (saw my student house this weekend, think its going to appear on Houses From Hell on ITV soon ).

    A lil scard about Econometrics next year as it looks difficult.

    Also does anyone know anything about taking Masters abroad particularly in America as I've been reading up on a course at NYU, MA in Economics and it looks really good. Only downside is the $30,000 needed and guessing my LEA won't help out as its in USA :P
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    haha ya im going into postgrad actually. but a lot of my mates are working now. a couples are doing graduate training with the big 4s.

    to be honest, my tutor wasnt that much of use either for the 3 years of uni life. I was told that most tutors were oversubscribed with the no. of tutees. like one would have 15-20 ish. that's just crazy. so don't expect your tutor to know you well unless you pay regular visits to him but i doubt you could as their time is scarced.
    maybe you should've gone to nottingham instead? lol at least the clubs n parties pay off

    so you're taking econometrics? well, i didnt take tha module. only remember a guy thought it wasnt too bad.but be careful with operational research. I knew a few people who did take OR thinking it was easy n they are excellent in maths but over 50% of them failed or just on the boarder line in the january exam. it was messed up that time coz in the exam one question had some mistakes n people wasted a hell of lot of time on that. nasty materials.

    US ' the place to go in my humble lil view. donno much about it tho one girl in my year is a genius. not only won a scholarship from manchester (70 is the lowest she'd ever scored at her time in uni) columbia university gave her one too!! she's off to the states to do her msc this year i think.
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    Cool you doing your postgrad at manchester? Swear you had to do Econometrics if you want to do a postgrad course but obviousely i'm wrong or are you moving from economics to another subject?
    Yeah Nottingham would only let me do Economics and Chinese Studies (dunno if I originally said that I wrote too much to go and read it again)and I would have felt weird doing that.
    Was the genius girl on BA Econ?
    I'm actually quite fortunate that I'll be getting two tutors next year because I'm registered as Dyslexic I get an additional "study skills" tutor whatever that means but I'll make him work for his money hopefully he'll have good advice.
    At the moment I am fixated on doing a Masters at Bristol or a good American University (two extremes I know) I should really start focusing on the present.
    Big thing putting me off an American university is the "gre test" which I'm positive you have to take which is like the SAT for prospective postgrads. Did the "genius girl" take this (sure she has a real name)?
    Anyway cheers for the continued posts
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    If you are interested in a good economics masters degree, then it has to be LSE!
    However, it is a tough course but along with it you gained the reputation.

    Manchester economics is pretty respectable so LSE should accept you.
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    no i didnt need to do econometrics or any maths if i chose not to. i did BA econ (economics) so i guess that explains why. BSc has more maths in it , most people on BSc have done Alevel maths. that's a pre-requisite to entry isnt it.

    hmm..nottingham does economics and chinese studies?.. that's interesting. from how i see it Manchester has more student life to nottingham.
    but manchester could've organised the tutorial group better. there's just way too many people in one group.seems liek theres a shortage of tutors.

    and yeah that girl did either BA econ or BSc. oh wait i think she's from BSC.there was a notice on the board next to the porter's desk last year about her being nominated for manchester scholarship. donno what her name is as she didnt socialise much. kinda like the type that goes to lectures and leave right away. i didnt get to see her often but she's a foreign student. do you know her or have heard of her by any chance?
    im not sure if she did gre but her grades are very convincing that she's gonna get high score on gre anyway. she did get a 1st class and didnt even bother turning up in the graduation. only thing i know if that she wasnt too fond of england. lol i wonder what she got on her average.

    the thing about american uni is the 2 year master programm. the tuition fee and living expenses gonna cost you a fortune plus you need a car to get around most of the time unless its a place like new york. but again, the american way of life is very appealing. i'd go if i could. are you thinking of doing master in economics then?
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    to go to graduate school in the US for a masters or a phd programme you need to do the GRE test. Its a prerequisite and there are no exceptions. That said its not very hard if you have a bit of a maths background as the maths questions only use gcse maths knowledge. It gets a bit tricky sometimes because you cant use a calculator but as i said its not very hard.

    The verbal is slightly harder as you need a good vocabulary which is something you cant learn in a few weeks. You get it from reading reading and reading.
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    Msc degrees are not very common in the US, especially in economics, so its not really the place to go. The only reputable universities that have masters degrees in economics (MA's, not MSc's) are (top 4 anyways) NYU, Boston University, Duke, and USC. The top students move straight into PHDs in the US, they don't do Masters degrees. The best masters degrees in economics are in the UK, Europe, or Canada. In Canada you can't even get into a PHD in economics program without a masters usually. The only field related to economics in which MSc's are strongest in the US is Mathematical Finance/ Financial Engineering. Schools like Columbia, Princeton, Stanford, NYU, Carnegie Mellon, UC-Berkeley have the best programs in this field. If you're looking at MSc in Finance, most of the best US schools don't do these either, with the only good programs being Boston College, University of Illinois, George Washington University, and Illinois Institute of technology.
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    In the US though if you do a phd you usually get a masters degree given to you in the process after satsfactionary completion of the core courses, but as the post above me said correctly, the top programmes dont offer single stand apart MAs
 
 
 
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