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    hi, for some reason i am having trouble on factorising:

    30x - 3x^2 - 72

    i am having trouble with signs etc all fitting in.
    help really needed. cheers. **
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    (Original post by alex_thompson)
    hi, for some reason i am having trouble on factorising:

    30x - 3x^2 - 72

    i am having trouble with signs etc all fitting in.
    help really needed. cheers. **


    Can you not just use the formula? Or does it need to be in brackets? Only I can't seem to make it work either...
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    (Original post by alex_thompson)
    hi, for some reason i am having trouble on factorising:

    30x - 3x^2 - 72

    i am having trouble with signs etc all fitting in.
    help really needed. cheers. **
    i know, i am having the same problems!
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    Is it equal to 0? if it is then all sings reverse to get
    3x^2 -30x +72 = 0

    which factorises to

    (3x - 18) (x - 4) = 0
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    (-x+4)(3x-18) works, expand to test and see how


    a useful site when i was doing maths last year is

    http://www.mathsnet.net/index.html

    click on AS/A2 (might have gcse stuff too)
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Can you not just use the formula? Or does it need to be in brackets? Only I can't seem to make it work either...
    well no.

    i am doing differentiation, and is about finding turning points etc for a given equation of a curve.

    u need to set it to zero:

    0 = 30x - 3x^2 - 72

    and i thought that i factorised the thing, then i get two solutions which give me the two different x-coordinates of the turning points, and from then on i can find the y-values of these 2 turnin points and so on....

    but i cant factorise it! signs!
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    Can you not just use the formula? Or does it need to be in brackets? Only I can't seem to make it work either...

    No wait got it I think!

    (3x - 18)(-x + 4)

    That right?
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    No wait got it I think!

    (3x - 18)(-x + 4)

    That right?
    Seems right. I can't really be bothered about checking, though.
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    (Original post by nero076)
    (-x+4)(3x-18) works, expand to test and see how


    a useful site when i was doing maths last year is

    http://www.mathsnet.net/index.html

    click on AS/A2 (might have gcse stuff too)

    lol drat, should have checked before I posted! At least I got it anyway
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    (Original post by alex_thompson)
    well no.

    i am doing differentiation, and is about finding turning points etc for a given equation of a curve.

    u need to set it to zero:

    0 = 30x - 3x^2 - 72

    and i thought that i factorised the thing, then i get two solutions which give me the two different x-coordinates of the turning points, and from then on i can find the y-values of these 2 turnin points and so on....

    but i cant factorise it! signs!
    but if you use the formula, get two solutions which you can use as normal...
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    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    No wait got it I think!

    (3x - 18)(-x + 4)

    That right?
    thanks very much.

    i got the same answer just b4 i was about to read this post!

    yep, that is correct.

    thanks all 4 helping.
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    (Original post by kikzen)
    but if you use the formula, get two solutions which you can use as normal...
    yeahh i know, but i was wanting to try and factorise it instead, bcoz it did factorise.

    in an exam, i wud hav just ued the quad. formula.......
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    I dont think you have to factorise, as far as i can remember the turning points are when dy/dx = 0 (after differentiation). So if you differntiate the equation you get 0= 30 -6x so the turning point is when x = 5???
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    (Original post by George-W-Duck)
    I dont think you have to factorise, as far as i can remember the turning points are when dy/dx = 0 (after differentiation). So if you differntiate the equation you get 0= 30 -6x so the turning point is when x = 5???
    why would you want to find the minima?
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    (Original post by George-W-Duck)
    I dont think you have to factorise, as far as i can remember the turning points are when dy/dx = 0 (after differentiation). So if you differntiate the equation you get 0= 30 -6x so the turning point is when x = 5???
    the quadratic equation i already gave you was differenciated already!

    original equation: y = 50 - 72x + 15x^2 - x^3

    dy/dx = -72 + 30x - 3x^2

    gradient = 0 at turning points, therefore):

    0 = (3x - 18) (-x + 4)

    and so on...........
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    I thought he wanted to find the turning points? the gradient is 0 for turning points
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    (Original post by George-W-Duck)
    I thought he wanted to find the turning points? the gradient is 0 for turning points
    The question asked me to find the turning points (coordinates of turning points of course) of curve with equation:
    y = 50 - 72x + 15x^2 - x^3 and to determine whether these were maximum or minimum turning points.

    dy/dx = -72 + 30x - 3x^2

    at turning points, gradient must = 0, therefore:

    0 = (3x - 18) (-x + 4)

    therefore the two turning points on the curve with the given equation are when x = 6 and when x = 4.

    when x = 6, y = 50 - (72*6) + (15*6^2) - (6^3)
    therefore: when x = 6, y = -58.

    when x = 4, y = 50 - (72*4) + (15 *4^2) - (4^3)
    therefore, when x = 4, y = -62.

    in order to determine whether the points are a max or min. turning point, we differenciate the gradient function to get:

    (d^2y)/(dx^2) = 30 - 6x

    sub x=6 into above: (d^2y)/(dx^2) = 30 - (6*6) = -6

    THEREFORE THE CURVE HAS ONE TURNING POINT AT (6, -58).
    THIS IS A MAXIMUM TURNING POINT. [AS (d^2y)/(dx^2) gave a negative solution when x = 6 was substituted into the above equation)

    sub x = 4 into above: (d^2y)/(dx^2) = 30 - (6*4) = 6

    THEREFORE THE CURVE HAS ANOTHER TURNING POINT AT (4, -62).
    THIS IS A MINIMUM TURNING POINT. [AS (d^2y)/(dx^2) gave a positive solution when x = 6 was substituted into the above equation).
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    isnt mathematics fab????

    maths rocks (if you can do it)
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    who else in here enjoys maths?
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    Now i understand, your answer is right, i didnt know you had already differentiated, i just thought you had missed that step! sorry! As for maths been great, if you are one of those people that enjoy scratching their heads then yeah it is
 
 
 
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