Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    any1 doing a natural sciences course at uni? i was just wondering how it is? is it interesting? and do u think its gud to have bilogy at a level for the course?? thanx

    nemo
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    oh and wat sort of jobs can u get with that degree?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hi

    i will be doing natural science degree in cambridge next year so maybe i am able to answer u question.
    first natural science is just a combination of science course rather then a single subject. Chemistry, physics, biology, geology, math, zoology u name it nearly inculdes every single science there is. u don't learn every single subjects within it, u normally pick about 3 or 4 in your first year, and specialise to a single or joint degree in your second year. It is basically the same as all other science course except u can do more subject in u first year. (only few places offer it and mostly demands quite high grades. camb, durham etc. Also math is probably essential and u need one or 2 other science subs beside math)
    the jobs after NatSci degree, it really depends on wot u specialise in, because u get the MSci degree in the sub u specialise in.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Is it just me or do the majority of people who want to do Natsci apply to cambridge? - oh and maths is a must!!!!! My friend had to do an extra maths As level during her As cos she only did 2 sciences. It was only during her interview that she was told that if she wants to get into Cambridge, she has to do an extra science subject :s: poor soul!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ye most NatSci ppl apply to cambridge, because camb and durham is the only 2 decent please offers it. (and all offer are three As.)
    Your mathematics must be good enough to apply for natural science, during my interview about 20% time is testing my math abilities.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    thanx guys it was really helpful..it seems lke an interesting course because all i kno is that i want to do sumthin with math n science but i cant decide wat..so natural science seems like a pretty gud idea..the only problem now is getting the grades..im not exactly a genius in math..m doing my AS levels in math (mechanics), physics, chemistry and english(lang) so i think my subjects are ok. btw alexander87 wat was ur interview like, i mean wat did u have to do?? thanx for ur replies

    nemo
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yes, u As are fine for natural science, but maybe they will ask u a little more on the math side.
    My interview, i told them i intend to specilise in chemistry, (well i am thinking chemistry or physics, but for chemistry they don't need u to sent in course work. and i am terrible at writting eassys so i picked that.)
    i had 2 interviews. both academics ones. The first one is purely on chemistry. they asked to analyses groups, different bonding machanise, reaction machanise, so all the chemistry staff. the second interview also includes a lot on other science(which links with physics and biology only a little bit), and the math part drawing function graph. like 1/(X+1)squared etc.
    if u are interested in science u should definately apply. it is just the best science course in the country
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    more math??!?!..well im trying really hard and hope to get an A or B in my AS level... i read on the durham site that not every1 needs to go for an interview, is that tru? the thot of going for one scares the crap out of me..lol
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'm at Robinson College, Cambridge doing Natural Sciences. I only had one subject interview and didn't have to send in any coursework even though I expressed a preference for Physics.

    Unless you want to do biological subjects, you don't need Biology, although this obviously limits the choice of subjects for the first year to non-biological subjects, i.e. Physics, Chemistry, Geology and Materials along with maths. I think you might be allowed to take biology subjects without biology, but you're meant to do lots of work to catch up or something so it's probably not worth it.

    You will need A-Level maths, and you'll almost certainly need an A in it unless you completely bowl everyone over with your amazingness. If you can do Further Maths and get an A in it that might help too.

    My interview was half chemistry, where I was asked to do some mechanisms and deduce something about the nucleophilicity of various group 6 compounds and half physics where I had to answer some questions about a circuit and then solve a first order differential equation relating to a capacitor (that's maths you should cover at some point if you're doing A-Level).

    Edit: I also had to sit an exam. But that was a bit weird and I can't remember much about it, I'm afraid.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    thanx for replyin supermerp, how do u find the course? is it interesting? wat sort of things do u do??
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nemo199)
    thanx for replyin supermerp, how do u find the course? is it interesting? wat sort of things do u do??
    The course is a lot of work, seeing as you're doing 4 subjects at once. Some of the stuff is interesting, some of it isn't. I did Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Materials in the first year so I guess I'll go through them:

    Maths: There's an A course and a B course, with the B course being designed for people who did further maths and it covers extra material. I went to the B course although I only did Further Maths AS. The first term was quite difficult as it went through a lot of stuff the full FM A-Level people knew quite quickly but after that it wasn't that bad. If you do the A course you don't get any choice in the exam: there are 12 questions, 6 of which cover material from the B course only. The lecturers are ok, although the one from the last term was a bit dodgy. You do things like partial differentiation, multiple integrals, some vector calculus, matrices, gaussian integrals, solving (partial) differential equations and other fascinating ( :rolleyes: ) stuff.

    Physics: There's an A and a B course again but this time going to one or the other doesn't disadvantage you at all, it's just a difference in the way the stuff's presented. I went to the B course for everything except the last term, as the A course had a far better lecturer that time. Since I'm a physicist at heart, I found most of the stuff fairly interesting. In the first term you do mechanics and special relativity, some of which you'll probably know already and which includes gravity stuff.

    In the second term you do a course called "Fields, Oscillations and Waves" which is about waves (funnily enough), some electromagnetism stuff and lots of things to do with complex impedance in circuits which isn't very interesting. The second course involves a lot of complex numbers and Euler's Formula.

    In the third term you do statistical and quantum physics, which involves lots of integration of gaussian integrals to get the Boltzmann Distribution and then some fairly hand-wavey explanation of solving the Schroedinger Wave Equation. I didn't like this course much and avoided questions on it in the exam.

    Chemistry: A guy called Pete Wothers does a lot of lecturing on this course and he's really good, although the second time he lectures you the material is really quite shockingly boring and I really didn't like it. You do some organic chemsitry, which is lectured by my Director of Studies and isn't that bad, although I've got to be nice about him. There's thermodynamics (the lecturer talks like a farmer) and kinetics (the lecturer looks like Postman Pat) stuff which is quite easy if you're good at maths - they're just integration and differentiation and messing around with equations most of the time.

    Materials: Is boring. Oh so very boring. My supervisor for it was my best supervisor, though. And if you can stick with it I'm assured that it gets more interesting in the second year and it's a small department (because everyone hates it from the first year) so it's nice to work in. The lecturing is pretty shocking except for the Biomaterials course, which is really really well lectured. In comparison to the rest, anyway. You should perhaps consider doing Geology instead, except you have to write essays for that. But you do get a trip to Scotland and do a lot of colouring in.

    As far as practicals go you'll have 4 hours of emotionally crushing practicals every fortnight in Physics, 2-3 hours of fairly relaxing (depending on your demonstrator and where you go for lunch) practicals in chemistry every fortnight and theoretically you have 4 hours of Materials practicals if you do Materials. But you can skive off Materials normally, except for the assessed practicals. In chemistry and physics all your practicals except one or two are assessed so you have to go to all of them. Other subjects have practical exams at the end of the year.

    You'll have one hour of supervisions for all your subjects, which is basically where you get set homework by your supervisor and go through the stuff you handed in before.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    wow thanx for the info..it sounds quite difficult..lots of hard work hehe. im more into biology so might take that route. but otherwise its pretty interesting. btw thanx for takin the time to write all that.. really appreciate it
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    It sounds bloody difficult. Are you left with much time outside of studies? Howmuch homework are you expected to do?
    The course sounds pretty interesting though.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    There's plenty of time to socialise and go to places like cindies and learn to juggle if you're organised enough. Normally you're expected to do 7-10 examples sheet questions for Chemistry, Maths and Physics and Materials is weird. It depends, though.

    If you're concerned about the workload you might consider the discussion in this thread useful, especially any contributions from Willa and Lauren as they're first year NatScis.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    dont forget UCL! Theyre doing NatSci for the first time this year- its gotta be good- AAA requirements too!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexander87)
    ye most NatSci ppl apply to cambridge, because camb and durham is the only 2 decent please offers it. (and all offer are three As.)
    Your mathematics must be good enough to apply for natural science, during my interview about 20% time is testing my math abilities.
    Not necessarily all offers are 3As - TakemetoAvalon got offered AAB for Bio NatSci at Cambridge

    I didn't know you get an MSci after graduation in ALL NatSci courses? :confused: I thought it was just Cambridge that offers it - but then again I've heard rumours it offers that for all subjects you do at Cam anyway. Or at least, the course they've just graduated from, is named a BA when it's MSci level.

    And yeh the Cam NatSci course looks excellent - Maths isn't exactly "essential" according to the prospectus but yeh you're disadvantaged in your application to Cam without Maths, so lol if you're heading for Cam take Maths!

    And yeh most NatSci courses want at least AAA anyway and the best one and the only one I ever liked was Cambridge's. Reading and Bath both offer NatSci too.

    Yeh go check out the Cam subforum there're quite a few NatScis around there.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by misty)
    dont forget UCL! Theyre doing NatSci for the first time this year- its gotta be good- AAA requirements too!
    I've heard rumours that it is a really bad course.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    NB not all Cambridge NatSci courses give you an MSci at the end - only the Physical sciences (Chemistry, Physics, Geology - I think, Materials) and Biochemistry. All the others, including most of the Bio options, are only 3 year BAs.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i thought for all the subjects if u continue to the 4 year u will get the MSci degree. (except the general science option)

    Not necessarily all offers are 3As - TakemetoAvalon got offered AAB for Bio NatSci at Cambridge
    ye biological science sometimes ask for lower offers, inthe perspects, it says physical nature science AAA and biological AAA/AAB. So maybe it is better to just apply biological and just do physical once u get here . i am pretty certain it would work, but u need to have biology though. (and don't tell them u switch to physical asa u get here .

    u right about math aren't exactly essential at A level. but a quarter of interview is about math, So unless u are super talent at it, take it to A-level.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexander87)
    So maybe it is better to just apply biological and just do physical once u get here . i am pretty certain it would work, but u need to have biology though. (and don't tell them u switch to physical asa u get here .
    Sometimes if you do that you have to have another interview with the Physical NatSci DoS. The only person I know who switched from Biological to Physical at the beginning of the year had to do that anyway (she went to Newnham, for what it's worth).
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 8, 2005

1,122

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.