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    (Original post by hyuuga)
    I don't mind working more if the outcome is better, e.g. at cambridge. because you can go to genetics and experimental psychology in the course you can become qualified within these areas. In durham by choosing the modules yourself you are kinda missing out on some of the accredited qualifications, am i right?
    Umm, no, you can't. In the 3rd year you only take one subject, unless you do the general course. Taking 2nd year courses in genetics and experimental psychology =/= being "qualified" with "accredited qualifications" in both genetics and psychology.
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    (Original post by hyuuga)
    The cambridge course is more qualifying as in suited more to a few direct career paths especially with the specialist subjects. In durham the general 'science' degree wont be as valuable.

    I don't mind working more if the outcome is better, e.g. at cambridge. because you can go to genetics and experimental psychology in the course you can become qualified within these areas. In durham by choosing the modules yourself you are kinda missing out on some of the accredited qualifications, am i right?
    I'm not sure whether you can make such assertions. The Durham course seems to offer you the opportunities to get qualified in such areas as well.

    Is a cambridge graduate from NatSsci definitely more valued than a durham one in a particular subject? Basing the answer on whether the course content makes you 'better' from cambridge.
    I think the real answer is simply to do with the reputation of the universities, having a degree from Cambridge will always unduly impress a certain section of society.
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    I was told that to become qualified within experimental psychology you must take four modules of psychology a year in durham, leaving you with only two left to choose. In cambridge it can be taken alongside a greater depth within other subjects too.

    Crana9- Are you saying you can hold an accredited psychology degree by the end of the 2nd year(in cam) or only fully in the one you continue through to the 3rd year?

    If the same career possibilities are available at durham, with a similiar depth in a similiar number of subjects then that would be ideal. But thats why I am checking with people who know.

    There is also a greater oppurtunity for Msci in cambridge, right?

    Please people time is running out!!!. I either need to accept my durham place and leave it there, or forfeit it and apply for cambridge, I'm on my gap year now. Putting it that way it seems so much simpler to go to durham actually....but give me your views and advice. I kinda left it a bit late too so that doesn't help.

    Also if I do confirm my place and then decide that i want to to re-apply in the 2006 Ucas system, would that be possible?
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    (Original post by hyuuga)
    I was told that to become qualified within experimental psychology you must take four modules of psychology a year in durham, leaving you with only two left to choose. In cambridge it can be taken alongside a greater depth within other subjects too.

    Crana9- Are you saying you can hold an accredited psychology degree by the end of the 2nd year(in cam) or only fully in the one you continue through to the 3rd year?
    I said "Taking 2nd year courses in genetics and experimental psychology =/= being "qualified" with "accredited qualifications" in both genetics and psychology."

    You only get a degree in the one subject (or in "general" NatSci) that you take for 3rd year.

    You do not get any kind of degree by the end of the second year (Part 1B).
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    (Original post by hyuuga)
    I was told that to become qualified within experimental psychology you must take four modules of psychology a year in durham, leaving you with only two left to choose. In cambridge it can be taken alongside a greater depth within other subjects too.

    Crana9- Are you saying you can hold an accredited psychology degree by the end of the 2nd year(in cam) or only fully in the one you continue through to the 3rd year?
    (Original post by Department of Psychology)
    The BPS recognizes a Cambridge Bachelor of Arts degree as a suitable first degree in psychology if and only if you study and are assessed for both NST Part Ib Psychology and NST Part II Psychology during that degree.
    You might find this useful: http://www.psychol.cam.ac.uk/pages/teaching/course.html
 
 
 
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