Why is BeCl2 Covalent..not Ionic? Watch

jasbirsingh
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Please...can any1 explain?
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jeremybag
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sharing of electrons as opposed to chlorine gaining an electron...?
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Diaz
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Ionic is between a metal and a non metal.
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CHEM1STRY
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The polarising power of beryllium is high and the polarisability of chlorine is high so beryllium essentially pulls the donated electrons back so they are effectively shared.

Beryllium is a small atom and forms a 2+ charge so it has a high charge density making it easier for it to pull the electrons away from the chlorine despite its high EN value.
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jasbirsingh
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(Original post by Diaz)
Ionic is between a metal and a non metal.
I know ..Be is a metal and Cl is non-metal ...so it's meant to be ionic but it's not. it's COVALENT.
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jasbirsingh
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(Original post by CHEM1STRY)
The polarising power of beryllium is high and the polarisability of chlorine is high so beryllium essentially pulls the donated electrons back so they are effectively shared.

Beryllium is a small atom and forms a 2+ charge so it has a high electronegativity value, and chlorine is fairly large with a low charge (-) so electrons are easily pulled away from it.
Thanks! that's exactly what I was looking for. :yes:
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wer343lit
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(Original post by Diaz)
Ionic is between a metal and a non metal.
Yes, which is why the OP's question is rather confusing. :p:
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SirMasterKey
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(Original post by jasbirsingh)
I know ..Be is a metal and Cl is non-metal ...so it's meant to be ionic but it's not. it's COVALENT.
By metal, I believe it means a transition metal, so any of the d block.
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wer343lit
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(Original post by SirMasterKey)
By metal, I believe it means a transition metal, so any of the d block.
Be is group2.
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jasbirsingh
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(Original post by SirMasterKey)
By metal, I believe it means a transition metal, so any of the d block.
Nop, Be(Beryllium) is not a transition metal.
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SirMasterKey
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(Original post by Jonty99)
Be is group2.
(Original post by jasbirsingh)
Nop, Be(Beryllium) is not a transition metal.
Which is why it can't form Ionic bonds. As I said, as I believe it to be only metals from the d-block can form ionic bonds hence the metal-non metal

Which is why I was supporting the fact it is covalent.
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wer343lit
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(Original post by SirMasterKey)
Which is why it can't form Ionic bonds. As I said, as I believe it to be only metals from the d-block can form ionic bonds hence the metal-non metal
Which is why I was supporting the fact it is covalent.
That's not right though. :p:
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boromir9111
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Intermediate bonding perhaps?
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SirMasterKey
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(Original post by Jonty99)
That's not right though. :p:
Ah right, well Chemistry isn't my strong subject. :rolleyes:


Found an interesting thing on it here.

http://hypography.com/forums/chemist...-covalent.html
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_Andrew_
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I'm confused, it has be ionic with Be wanting to lose two electrons and the two chlorine atoms gain the electrons....?
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Turdburger
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For the same reasons that Hydrocarbons are covalent. The key word here is electronegativity, which is basically due to the size of the ions. Although there is a pretty high ionic character in BeCl2
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jasbirsingh
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(Original post by SirMasterKey)
Which is why it can't form Ionic bonds. As I said, as I believe it to be only metals from the d-block can form ionic bonds hence the metal-non metal

Which is why I was supporting the fact it is covalent.

(Original post by Jonty99)
That's not right though. :p:
(Original post by boromir9111)
Intermediate bonding perhaps?
(Original post by _Andrew_)
I'm confused, it has be ionic with Be wanting to lose two electrons and the two chlorine atoms gain the electrons....?
Here's the right answer given by CHEM1STRY

The polarising power of beryllium is high and the polarisability of chlorine is high so beryllium essentially pulls the donated electrons back so they are effectively shared.

Beryllium is a small atom and forms a 2+ charge so it has a high electronegativity value, and chlorine is fairly large with a low charge (-) so electrons are easily pulled away from it.
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wer343lit
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(Original post by _Andrew_)
I'm confused, it has be ionic with Be wanting to lose two electrons and the two chlorine atoms gain the electrons....?
It isn't, that's the weird thing. BeCl2 is covalent, with Be having a share of 4 electrons.
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jasbirsingh
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(Original post by Jonty99)
It isn't, that's the weird thing. BeCl2 is covalent, with Be having a share of 4 electrons.
Exactly:yes:
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_Andrew_
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(Original post by Jonty99)
It isn't, that's the weird thing. BeCl2 is covalent, with Be having a share of 4 electrons.

Well, it's a very strange molecule then:p:
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