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Whats so bad about 'New' universities? watch

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    students hav the best ability to go off on a total tangent....i love it!
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    (Original post by luvly_laura)
    students hav the best ability to go off on a total tangent....i love it!
    Isn't UWIC known for being really good at sport? In some sports, anyway.
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    UWIC is pretty bloody good for sports.

    They also have the national indoor athletic centre on their cyncoed campus.
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    (Original post by Ynox)
    So how is it that in 2003 my brother got into LSE for Accounting and Finance with A Levels in Maths, Computing and Economics?

    Edit- also:

    Applicants normally offer three A levels (A2s) in our generally preferred subjects, or two generally preferred subjects and one from the following list (this list is regularly reviewed by Admissions Tutors and is comprehensive at the time of going to press):

    * Accounting
    * Art and Design
    * Business Studies
    * Communication Studies
    * Dance
    * Design and Technology
    * Drama/Theatre Studies
    * Home Economics
    * Information and Communication Technology
    * Law
    * Media Studies
    * Sports Studies

    (taken off lse.ac.uk- where does it say computing alevel? ICT is NOT the same as computing....)
    Law????

    WHAT?

    :eek:

    No one who has any idea what law A-level actually involves would include it on that list. Shame on the LSE for not knowing their arse from their proverbial elbow.
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    (Original post by Ynox)
    tktaylor6- uh? Computing A Level not well respected? To be fair it is a piece of piss if you have half an idea of what you're doing, but if you don't then its pretty difficult.

    Out of the top 20 unis for CS in the UK I know that Warwick, Southampton, Bristol and Cardiff ALL accept computing ALevel. Additionally cambridge does iirc (went on an open day there in 2002 so i'm kinda rusty on that one).

    Sure you're not thinking of AVCE IT?

    To the op- surely its better to do a history degree in cardiff and then do a PGCE in Uwic? If I went into teaching i'd probably end up doing a PGCE there (the cyncoed campus is round the corner from home so pretty convenient).
    Well in fairness a fair few universities say that you don't need computing A Level to study a degree in computing, because so much of it is largely irrelevant and many computing applicants will have gained much more from their own research and fiddling.
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    Whats bad about 'New' universities? Simply the fact that they were created so that the government wouldnt have to make any real commitment or moves towards widening access to education and by lowering the overall standard could claim that they had made university education available to all. Its more or less the same as if the FA were to call every league division in England the Premiership and then pretended that the quality was uniform when in reality there would be a great disparity. The polytechnics were very good at what they did and served a valuable purpose but they are (generally, not without exception) sub standard universities compared to the older institutions. As for UWIC i thought that had merged with the University of Cardiff? Which is a very good university.
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    magicalsausage- most of the stuff I did at alevel computing (bar VB programming) has actually came up during my last two years at uni (warwick, computer science). Hence I wouldn't really say its useless.

    Theory may on the face of it seem irrelevant but to create new technologies you need to know how the old ones were created in the first place.

    edit- an Siarach- cardiff uni and UWIC haven't merged, they're still totally different institutions.
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    (Original post by Ynox)
    edit- an Siarach- cardiff uni and UWIC haven't merged, they're still totally different institutions.
    Ah its the medical institution im thinking of then.
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    isn't the government so desperate to get teachers as they're so much in demand that less people want to be them hence lots of teaching jobs available? with primary teaching wouldn't they be more concerned with the way the teacher interacts with the children than the institute they went to? however saying that unless you are 1000% sure you want to be a primary teacher, the cardiff option will probably leave more options open...
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    (Original post by Lirael Abhorsen)
    isn't the government so desperate to get teachers as they're so much in demand that less people want to be them hence lots of teaching jobs available? with primary teaching wouldn't they be more concerned with the way the teacher interacts with the children than the institute they went to? however saying that unless you are 1000% sure you want to be a primary teacher, the cardiff option will probably leave more options open...
    In some subjects there is indeed a shortage of teachers (mostly science subjects in secondary schools) but not in primary teaching.
    Jenn xx
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    Just to keep on terms with the whole "McDonalds University" hypothesis that some people are pressing, ex-polytechnics are little less than precisely that - "ex". All prestigious institutions had to emerge from somewhere, and as the annually updated league tables show, an increasing number of such Universities (as they now are in their own right) are shedding previously savioured Polytechnic links and lathering on increasingly University-esque levels of campus investment, employment prospects et al. And besides, there are many fields - such as those of an undeniably vocational bent, or Art and design - that are dominated by the ex-Polytechnic "New" universities in any case, so it is fair to say that from discipline to discipline the perceived handicap fluctuates considerably.

    Often this is a question that hinges not on the externality of finding employment, but on yourself and your very ethos of what University education "is". Personally if I was was to aim to make the moolah, I'd adopt for a far more innovative route than University, which from this vantage point seems more befitting to me to be described as 'adventure'. And I must admit, I had no idea just how favoured this ridiculous notion of having to woo employers with brand names really was until my entrance into The Student Room. The job market as a whole probably places far greater emphasis on the acquisition of work experience and universal 'skills' - as demonstrated by the league tables where, in employment terms, ex-Polytechnics often do a stellar job indeed.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    Its more or less the same as if the FA were to call every league division in England the Premiership and then pretended that the quality was uniform when in reality there would be a great disparity. .
    Perfect analogy. I will openly admit that it makes me cross when someone makes out that their marks are equal to mine when I needed AAA to get onto my course and they needed CCC or less. Who's kidding who? You've hit the nail on the head. It's illogical and an affront to common sense to argue any differently.
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    (Original post by Jonesy038)
    Perfect analogy. I will openly admit that it makes me cross when someone makes out that their marks are equal to mine when I needed AAA to get onto my course and they needed CCC or less. Who's kidding who? You've hit the nail on the head. It's illogical and an affront to common sense to argue any differently.
    If all courses were of the same standard then there wouldnt really be a problem as those going to 'lesser' universities would still have the opportunity to achieve a qualification to equal anyone going to one of the elite but this isnt the case. I have several friends who have just completed their HND in computing at the local college which officially means they have completed the first two years of a university degree. They tell me that anyone who has done the first half of Standard Grade (GCSE for you anglos) Computing would have no problem with it and it is almost impossible to fail given the number of resits available, the lax marking/moderating and the fact that it is almost 100% coursework assessed which means cheating is rife. Any qualification achieved under such conditions cannot rationally be said to equal the first two years of a computing degree at Edinburgh/Glasgow/whatever and yet officially it does. Ultimately its the students who miss out through this deception as they do not recieve the education or the qualifcation of the standard they were promised.
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    (Original post by Jonesy038)
    Perfect analogy. I will openly admit that it makes me cross when someone makes out that their marks are equal to mine when I needed AAA to get onto my course and they needed CCC or less. Who's kidding who? You've hit the nail on the head. It's illogical and an affront to common sense to argue any differently.
    After i got in, I changed my course that needed ABC to one that needed CCC, in the same uni though
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    Well I just looked in the guardian university league tables, and UWIC places fifth best in the country for teaching 'education', out of 80 universities that teach it. Job prospects there are rated as 10/10.
    so it seems to me you've made a good choice to do what you want to do.
    Oh, and also my boyfriend is going into his 3rd year at UWIC and he says if he had to choose universities again he would definitely pick UWIC. I'm going to cardiff university next year, and I think its a great city, so it's cool you will be in cardiff even though ur not in cardiff university!
    Good luck.
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    (Original post by an Siarach)
    I have several friends who have just completed their HND in computing at the local college which officially means they have completed the first two years of a university degree. They tell me that anyone who has done the first half of Standard Grade (GCSE for you anglos) Computing would have no problem with it and it is almost impossible to fail given the number of resits available, the lax marking/moderating and the fact that it is almost 100% coursework assessed which means cheating is rife.
    Admittedly, it is almost impossible to fail a BTEC HND if you submit *some* kind of work for each module. However, getting a decent grade is another thing... The main chunk of the course is marked externally and so it's not as easy to cheat as you describe. The thing about the HND qualification is that it does depend on what institution a student studies at - I studied at a technology college and I can assure you it was far more advanced than GCSE.
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    (Original post by ilovemonkeys)
    Admittedly, it is almost impossible to fail a BTEC HND if you submit *some* kind of work for each module. However, getting a decent grade is another thing... The main chunk of the course is marked externally and so it's not as easy to cheat as you describe. The thing about the HND qualification is that it does depend on what institution a student studies at - I studied at a technology college and I can assure you it was far more advanced than GCSE.
    Is there such thing as a HND that is not validated by BTEC? I know HND's are equivalent to the completion of the first two years of a degree course, is the content different, same, or similar? What are the assessment methods like?
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    (Original post by trev)
    Is there such thing as a HND that is not validated by BTEC? I know HND's are equivalent to the completion of the first two years of a degree course, is the content different, same, or similar? What are the assessment methods like?
    I am surprised you don't know this already, but HNDs are valdiated by examing boards. Edexcel is a common one for HNDs, so they are moderated in the same way as GNVQs and AVCEs.

    Universities do not award them, but some universities teach them .

    HNDs are equivalent to the first two years of a degree, this DOES not mean they are the same in anyway. However in many cases you can transfer to the third year of a degree course open completion of an HND provided you get a very good mark.
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    Some of the arguments in this thread just reek of snobbery - and it's nothing new. This whole 'new' university issue has been around for 50 years-when places like Keele were established it was said then, similarly it was raised with the technological universities (anyone want to criticise Loughborough in its areas of expertise now), then places like York were called the 'glass' universities deprecatingly. Then it was the turn of the poor old Polys, now the ex colleges. Every change has led to an outburst of snobbery by those unis already established. Incidentally there are many departments at more modern unis that out perform the more traditional unis. It's about what is relevant to you. If that's a new Uni then go for it and don't let snobbery get in your way.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    I am surprised you don't know this already, but HNDs are valdiated by examing boards. Edexcel is a common one for HNDs, so they are moderated in the same way as GNVQs and AVCEs.

    Universities do not award them, but some universities teach them .

    HNDs are equivalent to the first two years of a degree, this DOES not mean they are the same in anyway. However in many cases you can transfer to the third year of a degree course open completion of an HND provided you get a very good mark.
    Alright, I understand now. I just know that HNDs are validated by Edexcel now (in the first place, I didn't know, as they didn't say anything about Edexcel). How about HNCs and foundation degrees? Why are they validated by Edexcel and not the university like other university qualifications?
 
 
 

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