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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    Just saw this on Yahoo answers, it made me laugh:
    haha oh dear lol :P
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    I play Drums (mainly), Guitar (self-taught, not very good) and like to write songs sometimes.

    Had my grade 8 drum exam today. Think it went alright =]
    Good luck which pieces did you play?????
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    i guess im more of an indian musician but i started learning piano last year-ish...(gonna do grade 2 sometime...)
    i can play indian violin (grade 6) and LOVE singing (though i havent done grades or anything, but have performed quite a bit)
    i can play the sitar but not learning it right now...
    i like improvising and composing, though the only proper music ive written was for gcse coursework XD
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    (Original post by Jessipops)
    Good luck which pieces did you play?????
    667, Bonzo and Fusion. It's on the Rockschool exam board. Do you play as well?
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    (Original post by KaurPrincess)
    i guess im more of an indian musician but i started learning piano last year-ish...(gonna do grade 2 sometime...)
    i can play indian violin (grade 6) and LOVE singing (though i havent done grades or anything, but have performed quite a bit)
    i can play the sitar but not learning it right now...
    i like improvising and composing, though the only proper music ive written was for gcse coursework XD
    Do you learn western music as well as Indian? And is your Indian music classical or folk? I know a fair bit about Chinese music but very little about Indian aprt from scratching the surface of ragas and talas.
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    (Original post by Fingersmith)
    Do you learn western music as well as Indian? And is your Indian music classical or folk? I know a fair bit about Chinese music but very little about Indian aprt from scratching the surface of ragas and talas.
    well the only western music i learn apart from music gcse (finished now) is piano, so im not too good at it...but im proud to have picked it up so fast!
    i do indian classical music (mainly Sikh music)...id say folk music obviously uses the same theory but is just a different style...more lighthearted i guess...
    and what is chinese music like?
    the only chinese music i know of is c-pop!
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    Like you say the classical stuff is a bit more formal and requires superior instrumental technique but even some of what they call folk sounds phenomenally difficult. It tends to be a single melody, even if it's played on several instruments, without much harmony. Lots of percussion. It uses pentatonic scales a lot but other scales too. The instruments really fascinate me esp. the variety of wind instruments. I don't really play but I have picked up a couple of flutes on my travels and can get some sort of music out of them.
    What do you play?
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    667, Bonzo and Fusion. It's on the Rockschool exam board.
    Glad it went ok! I started playing the rockschool syllabus but changed drum teachers and he does trinity guildhall so I'm doing that grade 8 syllabus now
    Your the first drummer I've met on here, so hi!
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    667, Bonzo and Fusion. It's on the Rockschool exam board. Do you play as well?
    I'm playing 667, Bonzo and Whatever happened to Jazz on bass for my exam
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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    Just saw this on Yahoo answers, it made me laugh:
    no offence, but that's BS. I would say it's the other way round.
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    no offence, but that's BS. I would say it's the other way round.
    1) I said it made me laugh, not that I thought it was correct.
    2) Depending on the definition of musician used I think it could be halfway to the truth. Percussionists certainly have at least as much claim to being musicians as drummers, and if I had to pick the more artistic it would be the percussionist.
    3) Why would I be offended?
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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    1) I said it made me laugh, not that I thought it was correct.
    2) Depending on the definition of musician used I think it could be halfway to the truth. Percussionists certainly have at least as much claim to being musicians as drummers, and if I had to pick the more artistic it would be the percussionist.
    3) Why would I be offended?
    From being a drummer AND percussionist I enjoy doing both but the drummer has an arguably more important role. For example in an orchestra if one percussionist makes a mistake it doesn't really matter but if a drummer in a band loses the beat or makes a mistake it is much more detrimental. I suppose it depends what type of percussionist we're talking about as it's quite a broad term.

    Sorry for the superfluous 'no offence'
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    (Original post by jodrummer)
    Glad it went ok! I started playing the rockschool syllabus but changed drum teachers and he does trinity guildhall so I'm doing that grade 8 syllabus now
    Your the first drummer I've met on here, so hi!
    hi there

    I've done both trinity and rock school but stopped using trinity as the pieces were overly complicated and not relevant, the exams were so badly organised that at my last one I turned up and no one was there and when I finally found the examiner the drum kit provided literally fell apart mid-session.

    But saying that it is just my local exam centre and I'm sure it's better where you are XD

    /RANT
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    From being a drummer AND percussionist I enjoy doing both but the drummer has an arguably more important role. For example in an orchestra if one percussionist makes a mistake it doesn't really matter but if a drummer in a band loses the beat or makes a mistake it is much more detrimental. I suppose it depends what type of percussionist we're talking about as it's quite a broad term.

    Sorry for the superfluous 'no offence'
    Yes, the drummer is very important for holding the rhythm in a band but on an artistic level I think percussionists are on a different plane. I'm talking about percussionists like this:



    Music and performances like that allow the listener to engage with percussionists in a way I, at least, just don't with a drummer simply keeping rhythm in a band with the odd fill or flashy solo.
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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    Yes, the drummer is very important for holding the rhythm in a band but on an artistic level I think percussionists are on a different plane. I'm talking about percussionists like this:



    Music and performances like that allow the listener to engage with percussionists in a way I, at least, just don't with a drummer simply keeping rhythm in band with the odd fill or flashy solo.
    Interesting. I shall watch the video. I don't agree that drummers simply keep rhythm in bands but then again I s'pose depends on the band, genre and drummer.

    The percussionists you are talking about are like a solo guitarist or concert pianist in that people are concentrating on them purely and they are more technically and musically gifted - well ones like this anyway.

    When I was talking about percussionists I was thinking more off people in orchestra's such as a timpani player for example. I maintain that those kinds of percussionists are not, in my opinion, as impressive as good band drummers.
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    Interesting. I shall watch the video. I don't agree that drummers simply keep rhythm in bands but then again I s'pose depends on the band, genre and drummer.
    I'd be happy if you could show me an example where the drummer's role is significantly different and involves some artistic quality beyond hitting the various parts of the kit quickly and loudly. For all I know, there could be loads out there that I haven't heard, it's entirely possible that I have this completely wrong.

    The percussionists you are talking about are like a solo guitarist or concert pianist in that people are concentrating on them purely and they are more technically and musically gifted - well ones like this anyway.

    When I was talking about percussionists I was thinking more off people in orchestra's such as a timpani player for example. I maintain that those kinds of percussionists are not, in my opinion, as impressive as good band drummers.
    Ah, that word 'impressive'. I think we might be on different wavelengths here. Sure, Handel and Beethoven didn't write things for timpani which sound anywhere near as 'impressive' as the drumming of Kieth Moon, but it's very superficial to judge musicians simply by technical ability otherwise we end up saying things like 'Michael Angelo Batio is a better musician than Sergei Rachmaninoff was'. The professional orchestral percussionist has the task, for example, of blending perfectly with the numerous instruments of the orchestra, something perhaps absent or at least less troubling in a band situation where the drummer is usually okay as long as she doesn't play so loudly that nothing else can be heard.

    I think my point is best summed up like this: take a professional percussionist and put her in a band situation, she'll probably manage fine; take a drummer and have him play timpani with a professional orchestra, and I predict the results would be less impressive.

    Anyway, I don't mean to go on about this. Here's some more fine percussion music (quite well known):

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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    I'd be happy if you could show me an example where the drummer's role is significantly different and involves some artistic quality beyond hitting the various parts of the kit quickly and loudly. For all I know, there could be loads out there that I haven't heard, it's entirely possible that I have this completely wrong.
    I think you've misunderstood me. As every guitarist in every band does inherently the same thing - with them playing chords, riffs and bits of lead, for example, there are ones that do this better. Jimi Hendrix is still a guitarist but an exceptionally good one. I take it your description of 'hitting the various parts of kit...' is your description of the role every drummer does in every band, but my point is there are drummers that do this better and more impressively. You can't say drumers like Mitch Mitchell, Travis Barker, John Bonham and Jimmy Sullivan are not 'different' with a higher ability in playing.

    I think this is where there is a lot of prejudice- people don't realise there are good, bad and great drummers as much as they do, say, singers or guitarists.

    Also only amateurs play the kit 'quickly and loudly', and most seasoned drummers outside of death metal bands understand this.
    [/QUOTE]


    Ah, that word 'impressive'. I think we might be on different wavelengths here.
    Probably, I think we're both slightly confused about each others argument :P


    I think my point is best summed up like this: take a professional percussionist and put her in a band situation, she'll probably manage fine; take a drummer and have him play timpani with a professional orchestra, and I predict the results would be less impressive.
    I don't agree with this. A lot of solo percussionists couldn't play is a band situation. Although a lot of percussionists will also be 'band' drummer as well - it is very common that this is the case. I think we can both agree that there are percussionists that are very impressive as well as band drummers that are impressive - it's a matter of preference I s'pose.

    I'll leave you with a solo from one of my favourite drummers, Buddy Rich.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV_0h4ikEJM&feature=fvst
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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    I'd be happy if you could show me an example where the drummer's role is significantly different and involves some artistic quality beyond hitting the various parts of the kit quickly and loudly. For all I know, there could be loads out there that I haven't heard, it's entirely possible that I have this completely wrong.
    I think you've misunderstood me. As every guitarist in every band does inherently the same thing - with them playing chords, riffs and bits of lead, for example, there are ones that do this better. Jimi Hendrix is still a guitarist but an exceptionally good one. I take it your description of 'hitting the various parts of kit...' is your description of the role every drummer does in every band, but my point is there are drummers that do this better and more impressively. You can't say drumers like Mitch Mitchell, Travis Barker, John Bonham and Jimmy Sullivan are not 'different' with a higher ability in playing.

    I think this is where there is a lot of prejudice- people don't realise there are good, bad and great drummers as much as they do, say, singers or guitarists.

    Also only amateurs play the kit 'quickly and loudly', and most seasoned drummers outside of death metal bands understand this.
    [/QUOTE]


    Ah, that word 'impressive'. I think we might be on different wavelengths here.
    Probably, I think we're both slightly confused about each others argument :P


    I think my point is best summed up like this: take a professional percussionist and put her in a band situation, she'll probably manage fine; take a drummer and have him play timpani with a professional orchestra, and I predict the results would be less impressive.
    I don't agree with this. A lot of solo percussionists couldn't play is a band situation. Although a lot of percussionists will also be 'band' drummer as well - it is very common that this is the case. I think we can both agree that there are percussionists that are very impressive as well as band drummers that are impressive - it's a matter of preference I s'pose.

    I'll leave you with a solo from one of my favourite drummers, Buddy Rich.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV_0h4ikEJM&feature=fvst
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    I playyy Clarinet, Piano, Flute, Violin, Guitar, and I sing...I love Music Basically Xx
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    (Original post by oli_G)
    I think you've misunderstood me. As every guitarist in every band does inherently the same thing - with them playing chords, riffs and bits of lead, for example, there are ones that do this better. Jimi Hendrix is still a guitarist but an exceptionally good one. I take it your description of 'hitting the various parts of kit...' is your description of the role every drummer does in every band, but my point is there are drummers that do this better and more impressively. You can't say drumers like Mitch Mitchell, Travis Barker, John Bonham and Jimmy Sullivan are not 'different' with a higher ability in playing.

    I think this is where there is a lot of prejudice- people don't realise there are good, bad and great drummers as much as they do, say, singers or guitarists.
    Nonsense, nowhere did I say that. My only point is that in general I don't find them as 'musical', for want of a better word, as percussionists.

    Also only amateurs play the kit 'quickly and loudly', and most seasoned drummers outside of death metal bands understand this.
    I apologise for having to draw generalisations in the interests of not producing 300 line walls of text which skirt around every exception and loophole, but this was what I took from your use of 'impressive'. You are welcome to clarify and enlighten me.

    I don't agree with this. A lot of solo percussionists couldn't play is a band situation. Although a lot of percussionists will also be 'band' drummer as well - it is very common that this is the case. I think we can both agree that there are percussionists that are very impressive as well as band drummers that are impressive - it's a matter of preference I s'pose.
    Is there such thing as a 'solo percussionist'? There is only a small repertoire for percussion, and percussion lends itself a lot better to ensemble playing anyway: once melody as a musical feature has been removed, the percussionist has to work extra hard to sound musical essentially using only timbre and rhythm. The latter is no problem, but for the former there are only so many objects one person can hit at a time! Percussionists, of all musicians, are surely the most proficient ensemble players.

    I'll leave you with a solo from one of my favourite drummers, Buddy Rich.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV_0h4ikEJM&feature=fvst
    This illustrated my point about timbre quite nicely. It started out okay, but quickly became tedious - no contrast at all. Maybe I missed something, but I just found it boring.
 
 
 

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