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    I play piano, keyboard and drums. And used to play recorder, as we all did!

    Own a grand piano, portable keyboard, and a digital drumkit. (I work for Yamaha, big discounts )
    And 2 plastic recorders I think!
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    oh my god... you lucky *******!!!!!!
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    My mum has a Steinway medium grand... another reason I wish I could play the piano! >.<
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    My mum has a Steinway medium grand... another reason I wish I could play the piano! >.<
    Steinways are awesome. My grandpa has a concert grand... it's orgasmic... *sighs and wanders off into thought*
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    *plays the piano*
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    (Original post by thebucketwoman)
    I play piano, keyboard and drums.
    Wahey, another keyboard player

    On the Steinway thing - Bosendorfers are where it's at, man! Steinways are, like, sooo over-rated :p: I love Bosendorfers, they're beautiful.
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    notice that there are many many piano players I actally expected more guitarists to be here what with todays modern musical....tastes
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    I'd play guitar if I could understand it...it seems too complicated, what with all the 'tabs' and stuff... :confused:
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    It is much easier than it looks. Think of a tab as a graph. each number is on one of 6 lines. Each line is a guitar string and each number is the fret on that string you press.

    If it were a graph, along the bottom is time
    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    Would be 2 chords in sucession
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    So anyhow, after murdering it.

    Any more votes on the icon? Ive had 3 I think, thats hardly a decent number to made a conclusive decision.

    PM me the vote please, the candidates can be seen on the first post (a link to them)
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    That still seems pretty complicated to me! :confused: Gimme a plain old treble clef stave anyday...

    How do we vote? PM you?
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    ^^
    the post previous sais to PM it me
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    (Original post by Rasta)
    Wahey, another keyboard player

    On the Steinway thing - Bosendorfers are where it's at, man! Steinways are, like, sooo over-rated :p: I love Bosendorfers, they're beautiful.
    Noooo, Yamaha is where its at dude! You've gotta try a Yamaha S-series Concert Grand, simply devine.

    On Bosendorfer vs. Steinway... Bosendorfer are really too expensive. I prefer the sound of Steinway, and they are priced much more realistically. Still too expensive compared to Yamaha of course...
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    (Original post by MR_JR)
    It is much easier than it looks. Think of a tab as a graph. each number is on one of 6 lines. Each line is a guitar string and each number is the fret on that string you press.

    If it were a graph, along the bottom is time
    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    Would be 2 chords in sucession
    ya-wha??? even more confused!! i give up trying to understand, ill stick to my nice piano and flute. much easier to understand - A,A#,B,C,C#,D,D#,E,F,F#,G,G#!
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    treble and bass clefs are soo much easier than that d-3--7 or what ever it was! *head spinning*
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    (Original post by trish xx)
    ya-wha??? even more confused!! i give up trying to understand, ill stick to my nice piano and flute. much easier to understand - A,A#,B,C,C#,D,D#,E,F,F#,G,G#!
    lol, it's hard to explain it over the internet!

    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    the vertical line of numbers count as one chord, so there's two lots of chords. For the first chord, just put your fingers on the third frets of the d and a string and the first fret on e (all together, like playing a three note chord on the piano), and simply move down 4 frets from those positions and sound all three notes for the second chord. Guess I didn't make that any easier!

    I self taught myself guitar and mando, and it took a bit of time to get your head and fingers around( :p: ) but it will come naturally soon enough

    lol, and a perpetual problem I've had myself in ages, if anyone plays the harmonica or a similiar instrument that requires bending notes, how do you do it? I googled it on the internet and they usually say it's too complicated to explain, experiment with your mouth :eek:
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    (Original post by Krysa)
    lol, it's hard to explain it over the internet!

    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    the vertical line of numbers count as one chord, so there's two lots of chords. For the first chord, just put your fingers on the third frets of the d and a string and the first fret on e (all together, like playing a three note chord on the piano), and simply move down 4 frets from those positions and sound all three notes for the second chord. Guess I didn't make that any easier!

    I self taught myself guitar and mando, and it took a bit of time to get your head and fingers around( :p: ) but it will come naturally soon enough

    lol, and a perpetual problem I've had myself in ages, if anyone plays the harmonica or a similiar instrument that requires bending notes, how do you do it? I googled it on the internet and they usually say it's too complicated to explain, experiment with your mouth :eek:
    basically to summarise, there are numbers these are the finger positions, ie which fret. If it was complete it would look like this:
    e-----
    b-----
    g-----
    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    the top e is the thinest string, therefore the bottom is the thickest. Basically you are reading vertically, therefore 3 notes are being picked, strummed at the same time. This would be (4th finger on the 4th string, 3rd fret), (3rd finger 5th string 3rd fret) and (1st finger, 1st fret, 6th string (thickest) with this finger position you pick/strum and this is one chord.

    The second is self-explanatory, you just move you fixed finger position 4 frets up the fret board.

    hope that helped
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    Just like my avater!
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    (Original post by Krysa)
    lol, it's hard to explain it over the internet!

    d-3--7
    a-3--7
    e-1--5

    the vertical line of numbers count as one chord, so there's two lots of chords. For the first chord, just put your fingers on the third frets of the d and a string and the first fret on e (all together, like playing a three note chord on the piano), and simply move down 4 frets from those positions and sound all three notes for the second chord. Guess I didn't make that any easier!

    I self taught myself guitar and mando, and it took a bit of time to get your head and fingers around( :p: ) but it will come naturally soon enough

    lol, and a perpetual problem I've had myself in ages, if anyone plays the harmonica or a similiar instrument that requires bending notes, how do you do it? I googled it on the internet and they usually say it's too complicated to explain, experiment with your mouth :eek:
    i got it! yay! or at least i think i did! i may leave fiddling with my dads guitar for a while though. but......which string is which?? ok got that from the next post, but it confused me all over again :confused:
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    I don't think it's imperative to learn how to read tabs. I'm not exactly fluent in reading tablature, especially not for chords, and I'm not so bad...
 
 
 

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