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    that's quite interesting, because i'd assume it's the opposite here.
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    Presumably, it's due to the large number of sciencey words and things derived from the Classical languages. Whereas we see studying languages as part of the Arts or Humanities.
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    (Original post by Tobias)
    Any good recommendations for books etc for doing the above for A Level?!
    Athenaze is a good course.
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    woohoo, i started teaching myself ancient greek last night (well 1am this morning for an hour or so) and continued with it today...

    it's really fun! although i was very vaguely familiar with transliterated words, this really does give a whole new level to western language as i know it! havn't really got into the grammar yet, but it's really enjoyable nevertheless. and i'm using that book i linked to in an earlier post from amazon.
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    Paws for the Greek learning. Isn't it so cool? I'm trying to convince my mum that Sanskrit and Classical Greek would be a really good degree for me to choose.
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    havn't you already applied for a degree, or are you reapplying?

    it is really cool though, after doing latin it's quite refreshing to start something with it's own alphabet and "type" of words if that makes sense. as in english, french (and latin i suppose) are pretty much latinate (english is germanic as well obv), but greek is it's own branch on the etymological tree.

    and sanskrit would be the trunk of that tree it seems! would you seriously consider it as a degree!?
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    I applied last year, then screwed up my last lot of exams (ended up with ABCCD, so resitting BCD. They may have been right about exam technique.), so I'm re-applying for a couple of Classics courses, a couple of art history with languages, and maybe some straight language courses. I kind of need to make some decisions there.
    That's why I'm so keen on the Sanskrit idea, it'd be so interesting. But only four UK universities offer it (Oxbridge, SOAS, Edinburgh) and I'm not sure how well it'd fit in with my other subjects, I don't know if I can make my PS work for Sanskrit as well as modern languages and classics and art history. And I don't know if it's really a sensible choice in terms of my subsequent career: modern languages are obviously way more useful, and classics and art history are both good, solid humanities degrees that I can use as a basis for just about anything, whereas Sanskrit is a bit more...'out there'. And I really miss doing my random Greek stuff...
    I also briefly looked at Arabic, Persian, Turkish, etc., but my mum's convinced I'd get lynched doing anything like that (being an outspoken, opinionated, feminist atheist...). My first degree, at least, ought to be in something vaguely sensible. And yet, Sanskrit just really appeals to me.
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    well like i'm taking this autodidactic route, alongside a bog standard degree, i'm sure you could do the same! it's also really cool doing something just for the hell of it, in your own time, without any examiner's subjectivity, teacher's prejudices etc; it's actually a lot more fun and rewarding.
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    I hate that word, "autodidactic". It just seems really ugly.
    Anyway, back on topic (um, sort of), I might do that. Although I'm also thinking of teaching myself (much nicer, and probably more volkisch, than autodidactic!) Arabic, so I maybe ought to concentrate on one thing at a time. Or possibly stop playing around with fun ancient languages and do some proper work
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    Why is Bryanston not practical, Madelyn? Sorry for being nosy, I'm just curious - I would have thought that it was extremely practical for anyone considering doing Classics at uni. I guess if you're not decided it makes some sense, though the decision might be made for you one way or the other if you go! I can see your dilemma about the other languages; i always rather fancied learnign Sanskrit et al too, and almost switched to Classics with Arabic until I realised it would mean giving up too much classics...it's a hard decision though.
    Tobias - I learnt A-level Greek from scratch in 2 years (it is possible, and now I'm doing it at uni) and I used Athenaze, worked through book 1 in the summer with some lessons, but mostly at home, and I think it worked very well. The trick, whatever you use, is to make sure there are English to Greek exercises there and do lots of them - they may seem like too much unnecessary effort but they are really good for your Greek!
    Sorry, this was a long post, I hope people have got something useful out of it anyway.
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    Seconding the English to Greek thing, it's so helpful and means you really have to know your Greek!
    Bryanston's kind of expensive, and I'm not sure I want to be in England then, if I have to be at school for all of this year then I will need to get out of the country over the summer. But my very dear mummy and daddy, whom I adore ever so much, have said they might consider paying for Bryanston! So now I'm thinking about going, I think it'd be really fun (two weeks of Greek sounds pretty much like my idea of heaven) and obviously great for my Greek and Classics generally.
    I really, really want to do Classics at uni (specifically, at UCL), but lots of places now demand B grade A level Latin. I currently have a D (my module results were ABBUUU, impressively), so I'm trying to be realistic about my chances and making sure I have back-up options, otherwise known as MFL. And now I'm getting really worried about my personal statement, I don't want to write it because then my application will be done and I'll have to send it and I'm so not prepared for all that. And I really can't deal with being rejected at the moment! And I don't think I've read nearly enough, especially not enough foreign lit, and obviously I don't deserve any of the places I'm applying for, so I'll end up without any university place at all.
    Paranoia setting in
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    ABBUUU? Hope I'm not venturing into sensitive areas here or anything, but are you sure that was you and not the exam board messing things up? It just seems like an odd combination, if you were capable of As and Bs in some but got Us in others. It sounds rather like all that fuss a few years ago, in the year above mine - and actually I think they were still at it in my year, they just didn;t admit to it. I got a couple of funny results which were ok in the end, but there was somethign up, I just never contested it; they might still be messing around with results. Worth a re-mark at all? Or perhaps you could re-take them in January, although then it would be too late for applications this year I suppose. I think UCL offers BBC for classics, at least that's what they offered me, and they said it was standard, though it was a couple of years ago. I don't know what they'd want for post-A-level applications though, it could be different, or perhpas you could ask them, pointing out that you did get A's and B's in some modules. They do interview as well, so they might be prepared to be flexible if they like you, and you sound really keen about classics, which they like! (You might hacve known all that stuff actually, about UCL, sorry if you did and I'm sounding patronising or anything!)
    I hope some of this was vaguely useful, I don't know the details, obviously, so I don't know if any of it is applicable to you, but hopefully there's something there. Bryanston def a good idea,l but you know that anyway! It might also be helpful when you;re talking to unis, as evidence of your commitment to classics, and also another language.
    Ok, sorry, another really long post, I tend to ramble on, but with any luck someone will find all that useful! And apolgies to the OP btw, I didn;t mention anything more about useful Greek courses in there!
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    The OP's probably either given up on it all, or is now fluent in Ancient Greek, so I wouldn't worry about him!
    Thanks for all the exam/uni advice, very nice and helpful but I did know most of it. I thought the ABBUUU thing looked a bit odd, so I asked for copies of the U papers back and, while they were a bit harshly marked, a remark wouldn't have made enough difference for it to really be worthwhile. It's the same problem as I've been having with history and eng lit, I tend to a) ignore mark schemes and so on, and just write the essay how I think it should be written, paying no attention to how the exam board would like me to write it, and b) write about the things that really interest me, which are great and fascinating and everything, but not really what the examiner wants to know! Plus my style is quite...'unique' - I tend to write in the same way as I think, which means hugely long sentences and jumping around a bit and bringing in other things as comparisons, which I find interesting but which looks irrelevant and/or show-y off to other people. So I need to deal with that, and the few essays I've written this term are vast improvements. And there were various other things going on last year, like my dad was pretty ill so I was taking time off school for him, and my brother was failing his second year at uni and my mum kind of lost her job, and the whole five A levels plan suddenly didn't seem like such a great idea...all a bit manic, really.
    I applied to (and had a lovely lovely interview at, and got a lovely lovely offer from) UCL last time round, when they wanted ABC with B in Latin, and I made them my firm choice but obviously didn't get the grades, though they were really good on results day (and subsequently), and said they still like me and would definitely consider me again this year with my resits (doing English in January and Latin in June). So we love them.
    So are you doing Classics at Oxford? Which college? Enjoying it? I applied last year and was rejected, but got over it and transferred all my affection to UCL (yes, I have love affairs with universities. It's perfectly normal). Have you been to Bryanston? What's it like? Clearly you think it's a good idea, so that's quite encouraging.
    Apologies for my long rambling posts, it's just nice to have another classicist to talk to!
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    I'm the same with the rambling posts, i just write down everything that I think of, hence all the university advice, which of course you know about already because you have applied to unis...think I knew that from another post of yours, but never mind, better to include it as someone will probably find it helpful.
    Sorry to hear about your problems last year, I hope things have improved for you. I'm really glad that you still have a chance at UCL - it soudns as though you have a lot of interesting things to say about classics (obviously they thought so as well), but that doesn't alwasy show up well in exams, as you said; you have to restrict yourself to the topic in question, which I've always found extremely annoying, as there's so much to say and so little time and opportunity to say it. Which is the wonderful thing about interviews; I loved my UCL interview and was strongly tempted to go there, but in the end decided on Oxford (because I'm a masochist who likes taking stupidly long exams, clearly...I'm not even some exam whizz either!).
    I'm at Christ Church, 3rd year now, and definitely enjoying it (more now that aforesaid exams are over !). It's more fun getting to choose options: I'm now, for the most part, doing the thigns I really enjoy within classics, and I still love the fact that now I have no other A-levels to get in the way, just lots of classics! And the discussion aspect is great too, as hopefully you will find - at school i was the only one in my year doing either language, and here there are plenty of people to discuss classics with at any time, who don't think I'm weird for liking it! It was the same at Bryanston (I liked it so much there that I went twice and wished i could go again!) - about 270 other people who all liked classics and wanted to discuss it, and who appreciated Aristophanes' plays and silly classics jokes (the Aristophanes play is one high point of the course, in English, with course and classics jokes, and lots of prop-making beforehand - the tragedy (in Greek) was also fun). i would think you;d absolutely love it, though your parents and fridns may not appreciate it, as you probably will keep talking abotu how wonderful it was (be prepared for the inevitable Greek camp jokes from non-classicists). It's also very good for your Greek, and gives you an opportunity to read things that otherwise you might not have got around to for a while or ever.
    Another very long post, but I have an essay on Herodotus due tomorrow, and guess which I find more appealing - writing an essay, or chatting about classics! Theoretically i should enjoy a classics essay, btu somehow it never works like that...
    It's good to 'talk' to you anyway, though maybe I should have used PM instead of hijacking this thread!
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    Ok, I'd probably better not mention how jealous I am that you're getting to write an essay on Herodotus, because that would just make me sound really sad and Classics-obsessed. Though in a thread about learning Ancient Greek, who's going to care? So I hope your essay's going (gone?) well, and at least you didn't have exams in your first year - that was one of the best things about the Oxford course! I visted Christ Church a couple of times (I have an uncle at All Souls, so was allowed random private tours) and to be honest found it a bit intimidating and impersonal, but obviously it's a fantastic place and you seem to like it! But I loved my UCL 'interview' too, though I'd hardly call it an interview, it was more just chatting to some random Greek professor in his office. Great fun!
    I'm afraid I don't quite share your glee at the complete focus on Classics - of course I adore Classics, but I already miss my other subjects. I just want to be allowed to focus completely on everything. I call it having a range of interests! Well, not everything, of course, Chemistry, for example, leaves me completely cold, but, you know, all the cool things like languages and literature and history and so on.
    The other thing that scares me a bit about Bryanston is there being other people there, I've been doing Latin as just me and a couple of teachers, so I'm not really used to sharing my Classics! And I went to a Classics day at Cambridge once and found it really odd, seeing hundreds of other classics people. I suppose I'd better start getting used to it, though! And there were other people in my Greek class. And a couple of my friends are now doing classics-related things (archaeology, egyptology...), and have started to admit that I was right about having the best subject. So there won't be that many people sniggering at me for going to Greek camp. Now you're making me really want to go to Bryanston - stop it! I ought to be doing something useful, not dreaming about studying Greek!
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    I've fInished the essay now - 5.30 this morning! I just couldn't concentrate, i spent all day on it, and much as I like Herodotus, I wasn't in an essay-writing mood! (I rarely am, actually, i just love discussing whatever the topic is in tutorials!) But you would have been welcome to my essay this time, or at least the writing of it. And it's good to be classics-obsessed! (I have somehting of a reputation for this here...and eveywhere else too.) It may get you a fantastically well-paid job in the end. I saw somewhere on a forum (might have been TSR, can't remember) a guy who had posted the degreee subjects and classes of some of his friends, along with the jobs they were now in and their salaries. The classicist, who didn't have the best degree ( I think 2.1, and some others had firsts) was earning £80k a year (can't remember his job, must look up), £30 k above the next person, who'd done law, adn about 3 or 4 times as much as the rest, who'd done things like Economics, English etc - all the degrees were from Russell Group unis, so it can't have been that the classicist was just at a better university than all the others! So there you are, you can combine being a classics obsessed with being practical about your future career! :-)
    I think I see what you mena about being interested in other stuff - when you said that I realised that i miss some things too, like science, but my 3rd A-level was maths, which i found quite hard, so didn't really miss that when I came here. I haven't done science since GCSE, but I do still like it, and I'd have liked to do more modern (in the Oxford sense of post A.D.284) history, which i didn't do for GCSe becaus ethe school I was at then had bad teaching and the course didn't look very interesting. I mainly get my languages and lit fix from classics, though I'd like to learn another language or 2.
    Mwahahaha, see I'm having some influence with Bryanston, not that you seem to need any encouragement to want to go there! In case you do, though, I'll just add that, while small classes and 1-on-1 is great at school (only one doing Greek or Latin A-level, though I did share some classes with the other 6th form year, and I would have hated to give up my mini-tutorials, which is what they felt like!), Bryanston is great to share the love/obsession with people who understand it! (because they too are obsessed).
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    i've managed to get myself onto a greece and rome module outside my english course at uni and it's SO fascinating. the first week looked at what happened to the mycenaean civilisation (all that stuff about their palace storerooms, the tholos grave things, linear b, theories about the "sea peoples" etc).. and now we've moved on to homer. although it's taught as an english text it's still really cool. although i love my english, there's no way i can ever give up classics.

    i've had a look at these Athenaze books on Amazon, but it's hard to know what a book's like without picking it up on the shop floor. i'll probably stick with the one i've got for the moment though.
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    I doubt there's many textbooks for above A level, surely you're good enough to read actualy ancient texts by then?

    http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin...ext&lang=greek (an amazing site - one of my favourites on the internet!)
    http://gainsford.tripod.com/lato/
    http://www.greekbible.com/index.php
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    (Original post by silence)
    there's no way i can ever give up classics.
    Excellent, we've got another one!

    Tritogeneia (finding your name really hard to type, how do you manage to log in? I suppose you'd get used to it eventually) - I know what you mean about not wanting to write an essay, however much you love the subject. Although sometimes I manage to get an essay title that really interests me and I start to really look forward to writing it. And yes, I do know just how sad I am. And I love it ^_^
    Hmm, at last, justification for doing Classics! Now I can point out to all the people doing 'useful' subjects how great my job will be. Plus the fact that I get to spend three/four years doing Classics, whereas they've been pissing about with Accountancy or something equally dire. Not that I actually know anyone doing Accountancy. Maybe I should acquire some accountant friends, just so I can sneer at them.
    I'm now a bit intimidated by your science/maths a levels, mine are all arts/humanities subjects, and I barely passed GCSE Science, so I'm always rather impressed by anyone who can do that kind of thing. I love the way that 'modern' history means so many different things - at school we had two A level history classes, and one did Hitler and Stalin and crappy economic stuff about turnips and was called 'modern history', and we did funky Tudors and the Reformation and so on and were called weirdos. I miss history already, I can't quite deal with the fact that I'll never study Elizabeth again. That's so depressing. And I kind of want to do a languages degree so I can learn new languages, Classics, while it does have strong links with MFLs, isn't the most obvious route into that kind of thing. Though I fully intend to exploit it to look at weird ancient languages.
    I'm now desperately trying not to look up everything I can about Bryanston, so that I don't get really into it and a) end up not going or b) get so absorbed in it that I don't do any work and fail everything. I've decided that I'll go if I get Classics offers, and otherwise I'll do something useful far far away. In the meantime, I think I might start Greek again, especially as I haven't done any for over a year and I really ought to keep in practice. And I really miss it, we had such fun lessons.
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    I have automatic log-in - I stay logged in all the time! Which does nothing for my work... I'm now getting annoyed by the fact that I typed my name in a hurry and it has no capital letter...grrr, I should have typed a capital. And I want a different name now, maybe Clytaemnestra, to scare those in the know. I get to write an essay about her this week! Well, ok, about gender in the Agamemnon actually, but I can put lots about her in! This is one essay I am looking forward too, Aeschylus is wonderful! (unless you're trying to read his choral odes in Greek in a hurry, arrghghhg, lovely though they are.)
    I am highly jealous of the fact that you got to do Tudors and the Reformation in history. I only did a little bit of them, in primary school, and the Civil War in year 8, but after that it all seemed to be modern stuff like the Industrial Revolution (yawn) and the Nazis again. Come to think of it, I did all the best historical periods in primary school - Greeks, Egyptians, Tudors. Now I want to do history as well!
    I only did maths A-level because my mum insisted - she has this thing about it being a fantastically useful A-level, and made both my brother and me do it, even though neither of us is exactly mathematically-minded. It was very hard work, but now I've got it I'm beginning to feel more charitable towards my mum about the whole thing - no doubt it will be useful! Though I'm worried that someone might ask me to remember the stuff I learnt, when I've forgotten it all!

    xaipei w phile! aristwv n twv Elladwv ylwssn! (sorry abouit weird combination, the Greek font wouldn't work! The ones that look like Greek letters are meant to be.)
 
 
 
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