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    Automatic log-in, cunning. But at least I can come on to TSR without logging in, and look around until I find something I really want to reply to. Which has only a marginally less detrimental effect on my work, but, you know, the principle is there. You could ask a moderator very nicely to change your name, if it matters that much to you. Only then I wouldn't recognise you, and you'd start talking to me and I'd have no idea who you were.
    I think I'm more jealous of your essay on Clytaemnestra (I mean, your essay which mentions her in context but definitely doesn't just talk about her because she's so damn cool...) than I was of your Herodotus one.
    I loved studying the Tudors, especially since I had a brilliant teacher (until she was forced to resign halfway through the year), but the Reformation wasn't nearly as interesting, especially the bits about Calvin (possibly the most tedious man in the world. He always reminds me of Mr. Collins in Pride and Prejudice). Better than your world wars any day! I still tend to think that history pretty much stops after Elizabeth: I can't stand Cromwell (any of them, but especially Oliver. And Thomas.), though I do rather like the Cavaliers. Primary school history was the best, I still remember making papyrus when we studied the Egyptians. Kids get all the fun. Let's go back to primary school!
    You still have an A-level in Maths *hugely impressed*, and it definitely makes you look well-rounded. I may have five a levels, but most of them are only languages.
    I'm quite impressed that I can understand your Greek/sort of Greek as rendered by a Roman keyboard. Does one say Roman keyboard? The concept doesn't seem quite right, somehow. Anyway, the point was, I don't think I dare reply in Greek as I know I'll makem assive stupid mistakes. I can only really remember how to say insulting things about young men in Greek - funny how these things stick in the mind!
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Greek isn't painful. Bloody difficult, sometimes, but never actually painful.
    Does anyone happen to know if there's a Cambridge Greek Course, like the Cambridge Latin Course with Caecilius and so on?
    Leannemann, why did you study the course but not actually take it?
    oh yeah, i remember, such a shame that i dropped latin after year 8, i would have really liked it! lol :rolleyes: i did greek for a while for GCSE and used the Oxford course for it, dunno if there's a caecillius sister book, be cool if there was though!! he was such a dude.
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    (Original post by rich_)
    dunno if there's a caecillius sister book, be cool if there was though!! he was such a dude.
    Damn right.
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    Oooh, rude things about young men? Share, please! My Greek insult collection is sadly lacking, despite doign an Aristophanes paper for Mods. Somehow I can't remember any of those insults, though perhaps this is for the best as they're all extremely obscene. My Latin insult collection is quite good though, courtesy of Catullus and those books like 'How to Insult, Abuse and Insinuate in Classical Latin.' I also have a book called X-treme Latin which is very funny, don't know if you've seen it. PLus I have a Latin haiku book that my classicist friend gave me for my birthday (not that those are insults). I think I really have too many Latin-related random books;I should get some Greek ones! Oh and of course I have Harry Potter in Latin, though not in Greek. I like to kid myself that my Greek/Latin are at the standard when i can just read them straight off the page with these, but sadly this is not the case really, it's just that due to my weird memory I can actually rememebr large chunks of Harry Potter texts (I'm not that sad, I haven't read them a million times, I just seem to remember things like that easily) so I have a kind of translation in my head. (I wonder why I can't remember Greek and Latin grammar that easily? :mad: )
    You're probably right about the name, it would just be confusing. I suppose my name is still after a very cool person/goddess, so it's ok, I can live with it! I'll just have to use MSN to show my appreciation for Clytaemnestra. And tutorials, of course .

    Ave atque vale! (nam lingua Latina etiam clarissima et formosa.)
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    Well, the rude comments about young men mostly come from the odd things our textbook required us to translate - there was one particularly memorable passage about naked soldiers in the snow. The only thing I recall at the moment is 'ho neanias estin oute andreios oute sophos' (which seems wrong now, estin looks plural. But I haven't done Greek for a while.), which I'm convinced this book made us translate. Of course, we loved this - my class consisted of one boy and four feminists, so lessons were always rather fun. I shall have to dig up (literally, my room is such a mess. I always need more book space!) my notes.
    I have a couple of that kind of book, but I don't remember the names. One's a sort of bluey-green, though. I really want a Greek Harry Potter, I got so excited when I noticed it had been published, though I refuse to look at the Latin one because 'Harrius' is a ridiculous name - clearly it ought to have been Henricus! I have the same thing about remembering pretty much entire chunks of HP, and while I am maybe just the teensiest bit obsessed (queueing at midnight...), I haven't read them that many times. Maybe the way they're written just makes them particularly easy to remember, and that helps to explain their popularity.
    Maybe you should get a t-shirt saying Clytaemnestra. You know, just for the fun of it.

    (Original post by tritogeneia1)
    nam lingua Latina etiam clarissima et formosa.
    And that's why everyone loves Tacitus.
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    Classicists coming out of the woodwork!
    Tritogeneia which college are you at?
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    hehe...naked men in the snow. My mum told me that her Latin teacher at school used to roll naked in the snow because he thought it was healthy! Now I see why other people think classicists are weird lol.
    btw estin is singular (arghghgh computers, it looks so wrong in the Italic (?) alphabet!) I always get eimi 'I am' eimi 'I shall go' and some forms of oida mixed up.
    I think you're right about Harry Potter being written in a readable and thus memorable way. I went to the Harry Potter society Halloween thing (yes I know the date is wrong) last night; now a Ravenclaw! Coolest house imo, but I don't like blue so much which is a pity. We should have Slytherin's colours. Or Gryffindor's, then I could get a red T-shirt and have Clytaemnestra on it so it's dual purpose! (Or should that be a purple t-shirt?) I think Cly. would be in Ravenclaw, not Slytherin.

    Feefifofum: I'm at Christ Church; you? I love these threads where all the classicists come out to play, I can never get my fix of classical banter. I hope the OP of this thread appreciates it too, considering we are a little off topic...still, we are discussing classics and not geenerally having random chat.

    P.S. Ahhhhhhh, Tacitus, evidence for all those dissenters who disagree that a Latin sentence should have a subject, an object and a verb in there somewhere. If Tacitus can instead use an archaic noun adverbially, an adjective, the verb of a subordinate clause and an understood main verb, why can't we? I think he's great...unless I have to translate him.
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    TSR keeps logging me out while I'm typing replies. It's not my fault I get distracted by Minesweeper! Grr.
    So, second attempt at replying...
    I'm beginning to sense a theme with this whole naked men in the snow thing - how interesting. Classicists, weird? How could you say such a thing?! Speaking of which, have you read The Secret History, by Donna Tartt? It's (loosely) about classics and classicists, and lots of fun.
    I'm rather impressed at my brilliant retention of an entire Greek sentence, though now I suppose I really ought to learn some more. Ahem. Definitely looks weird in the Roman alphabet (I think that's what we're supposed to call it...). We ought to acquire Greek keyboards (which I tried to spell as 'cupboards'. I'm really not up with all this computer terminology.) and just swap them with our English ones when we want to type in Greek. Although the letters would be in a different order, so it might get a bit confusing.
    Ravenclaw is so obviously the best house, and of course Clytaemnestra would be one of us, she doesn't really have the right character for Slytherin. And at least blue and silver look pretty together, aren't Slytherin's colours some ghastly* combination like purple and yellow? Unless they're purple and gold, and it's actually all just some massive Biblical reference that we've all totally failed to get. That seems likely.
    Time to start marketing those Clytaemnestra t-shirts!

    One day the classicists will take over! We already have several threads spread across various subfora, soon we'll even extend to places like Computer Science and H&R (though I'm not entirely sure how, or indeed why). Huzzah.

    Tacitus rocks! (now there's a sentence you never thought you'd hear...) I love the way he uses language, it's just so perfect and Latin. But Cicero is my true love. And I really don't like translation (hence applying for language courses :rolleyes: ), it seems so silly when something is already so well expressed in one language to try to force it into another in which it clearly won't work nearly so well. Let's make everyone learn Latin instead. Clearly that's a much better solution.

    *I think ghastly is a fantastic word and I'm trying to bring it back into everyday conversation. So far, alas, with little success.

    *crawls back into the woodwork*
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    I think Slytherin are green and silver, hence why I want their colours! Ravenclaw I think are blue and bronze, which is all right, but I think silver would be better, combined with a really dark blue...mmmm. The horrible yellow and purple is Hufflepuff, I think, which matches their stupid name (why, when all the other houses have good names?) Though I still don't get why RAVENclaw has an eagle for an emblem! Ravens are cooler, plus you can get lots of random Poe references in. I feel that Poe would have been a good classicist - I've only read the Raven really, because I was curious, but have been meaning to read more, and apparently most of his work is extremely twisted! And ghastly...

    After all, let's face it, we're twisted, which is of course the best thing to be - swishing around in cloaks and scaring people, mwahahaha. I think it's the stuff we read, or perhaps we start out twisted (and interesting etc of course) and are therefore attracted to reading about people cooking babies, killing their husbands and ripping their sons apart. I have indeed read the Secret History, which is very good, and also a book which is quite similar only about Latin at a girls' school, called the Lake of Dead Languages by Carol Goodman (good, though I object to the title on principle. Latin and Greek are not dead, they are immortal! You can get a t-shirt with this on...)

    Hmm, talking of twisted classical things, this could be how we get into H&R, with threads such as 'Help, what to do: should I sacrifice my daughter?' or 'My husband doesn't love me any more and has married a Corinthian princess; how should I take my revenge?' [NB for any mods reading this, I know H&R is a serious forum etc etc and am not really planning to post these! Sadly...]

    I know what you mean about translation never being as good as the original, but I find it very satisfying to wrestle with it and try and get it into the best English representation possible which is both faithful and readable. What I hate is having to write translationese because if I write what it should be some examiner/tutor will think I haven't understood the Latin/Greek properly and am just parroting the Penguin translation, grrrr! I really miss unseens and prose comp though, now I'm a big Greats student (noooooo!) and language work is considered 'unnecessary' at this stage! Why?! It's fun, and satisfying, and I like it! I know this makes me very very very weird, even among classicists.
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    hmm I wonder if my Greek keyboard program works on tsr... μηνιν αειδε θεα... yay! it won't do breathings though
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    (Original post by Kalypso)
    hmm I wonder if my Greek keyboard program works on tsr... μηνιν αειδε θεα... yay! it won't do breathings though
    Hey, you nicked my idea! I was going to sell that for millions! :eek:

    Tritogeneia – Green and silver sounds about right, but I don’t like them very much together. Ravenclaw’s colours are nicer. Though I’d never noticed the eagle thing. Maybe we should put Poe on our Ravenclaw crest, I think that would be amusing. We could tell ridiculously unfunny jokes about him all the time. The Raven’s pretty fab, and when I was little I used to read his short stories – are they called Tales of Mystery and Imagination, or something? Murders in the Rue Morgue and so on. And there was that horrible one about being buried alive. Yes, I see what you mean about him making a good Classicist!

    Huzzah, I got someone else to say (ok, type. Same difference) ghastly! Now your soul is mine.
    Why, why did you have to promise the mods not to start Classics-based threads in H&R? It would be fantastic. Besides, what if one day we found ourselves really in that situation? You have no idea how often the gods ask me to sacrifice my daughter, and every time I have the same moral debate whirling around inside me. Perhaps I should phone the Samaritans instead.

    The good thing about having done lots of classical translation is that when we started doing it in modern languages, I found it really easy – they never insist that you keep to the strictest possible interpretation of the text, and usually we still have equivalent words in English, plus no one else in the class has really done any translation before – great fun! And the challenge of it all is quite interesting, but then you think “Well, if Pope couldn’t do it, what makes me think I can?” Which would actually be a rather interesting way to live your life…I may adopt that as my motto.
    I hate having to second-guess examiners – it’s ok with tutors, because I generally know mine quite well so I have a pretty good idea of what I can get away with, but I’m never sure with examiners. Grr.
    Wow, someone else who likes language stuff! My German class used to think we were really odd when my teacher and I got all excited about cases and all the great things you can do with them and how it’s shocking (one of my favourite quotes ever: “this passage shocks grammarians”) that the genitive is going out of fashion. Language and literature are my big things, but literature’s mostly just because it’s so damn cool. Language is the important, serious one

    Yeah, we don’t swish around in cloaks for the fun of it, honest. Nor do we make enormous dressing gowns out of pink velvet. We’re normal people…
    Seriously, our twistedness probably comes from a combination of our own innate oddness and the early enjoyment of the bizarrities (what? It’s a word in French.) of others, which then encourages us to further explore such behaviour. That is, to study Classics. Best subject in the world.

    Yay, another Secret Historian (I’m so starting a club called The Secret Historians…)! I’m slowly collecting people who’ve read it around me. Currently I have…um…five, I think. Impressively, two of them are studying Classics-related things. I choose my friends carefully…
    I may have to find a copy of your other book (obviously you only own two books!), it sounds interesting. And I like your other t-shirt idea, I want one of those now too! Maybe it should have Clytaemnestra on the front and that on the back. Or vice versa. Oh, so many important decisions to make!
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    Nice Latin, Trolley - I've never managed a whole paragraph on TSR! Incidentally, Morwood's grammar is a good quick reference but is probably to be taken with a pinch of salt at times - my Greek language tutor thought it was wrong half the time, so proceed with caution!

    Madelyn - Salve, quid agis? Mwahahaha, I'm back! And in the middle of another essay, this time on Archilochus, whihc is scary because I know very little about him even after reading! My essay on Clytaemnestra ( I mean gender ) ended up as 3500 words! Far too long, then when I got to the tute I came up with a better way of looking at it since it's a huuge topic and needs narrowing down, which was = you'll never guess - focusing on Clytaemnestra and using her to look at gender in the play. So i coudl have written an essay on her after all, damn. Still, there was plenty of discussion about her in the tute, and I got to insult Agamemnon and ended up basically having a discussion about C's taste in men and her reasons for it (cool though she is, you must admit she seems to pcik losers, though Ag. probably wasn't her choice.)

    Am glad to hear that someone else shared - well, almost - my macabre choice of reading when young. Sadly I never came across Poe at that age, but I did read the unexpurgated Grimm's fairy tales, plus vampire stories, ghost stories and many other weird myth books, and of course Greek myths. I had this great book called The Luck of Troy by Roger Lancelyn Green (had some other ones by him too. I think he's partly responsible of my classics obsession ) Did you ever read that?
    Talking of books, I also have a coterie (love that word) of Secret Historians - all my classicist friends here have read it, it seems to be a requirement for being a classicist, like having Harry Potter in Latin. We were thinking we ought to have a Bacchic orgy too - there are too many cows round here! But we'd need a guy to be Pentheus, and strangely there aren't many volunteers...

    Talking (as you do) of twsitedness and ripping people apart, I think your theory is right - we start off twisted and then are attracted to classics and hone our twistedness to a fine art. We've clearly proven this theory through our choice of reading matter at a young age. Plus when I was little I wanted to be a sorceress or a vampire - both partly because they get to wear amazing clothes and swish around in cloaks. I always ened up on Gothic clothing sites when I'm bored, trying to stop myself turning my entire wardroeb into a feast of red/black/burgundy/green velvet...mmmmmmm. And big skirts, and fitted/flary coats...mmmmm. Too expensive, but soo nice. I'll have to content myself with the velvet I have, plus the fact that I have a bat. He is a large stuffed vampire bat, complete with fangs, and he's called Bruce (a completely random name). My brother gave him to me for an 18th present, but I often don't see him as my classicist friends at another college think he's wonderful and have a crush on him, so they keep stealing him and I have to get him back. It's quite amusing to walk through Oxford carrying a bat. I once had some children say 'oh look, isn't he sweet?' Clearly classicists of the future, yay.
    Talking of clothes, did you really make a pink velvet dressing gown? It sounbds great, I want one! I read a bok once where someone had a dark green velvet fitted dressing gown, now I want one of those! Also I'm jealous of your dress-making skills -I want to be able to make things but am v. bad at it, oimoi talaina.

    This post is getting very long again, adn i should be working, so I'll finish now, before I get any more excited about velvet and bats. And perhaps I will feel obliged to post on H&R when I have a genuine question about how to get rid of blood pollution, mwahahahahahaaaaaaaa.

    P.S.You can't have my soul, I sold it for the perfect cloak with a purple lining with 'Clytaemnestra' subtly written on it in Greek. I wish...
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    You are at Oxford, 3rd year I presume (correct me if I am wrong), studying Classics, yet you have never managed even a small paragraph of Latin on this forum? Don't you do any Prose Comp. over there? How can you read so much but write not even a little bit? I don't understand this.
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    Guilty as charged; I am an Oxford 3rd year classicist, I did prose comp. (sadly no longer, oimoi) for Mods last year and actually did fairly well! When I say I've never managed to put a whole para of Latin on here, it's less that i couldn't do it than that I have so far been too lazy to do it! This is probably becasue I am generally on TSR as a distraction from work, which means I never feel inclined to write reams of Latin - though strangely enough I am often quite happy to be distracted from classics essays by other forms of classics, just not, as a general rule, Latin prose comp at some horrible hour of the morning!

    All excuses, I know, i will have to remedy this; I'd prefer to do Greek but the font doesn't work, oimoi.

    Rogavisti quare non Latinam in hoc foro scripsissem, et vereor ne facile de crimine inertiae animae me liberam. Spero me verbis scriptendis probavisse animam meam neque Somno nimium languisse neque linguae Latinae peritiam amisisse quam olim mei erat, sed nunc lingua Graecorum obumbrata est.
    Coepi, sed mihi finiendum; nunc est canendum.
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