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    Just been reading the thread "What's wrong with new universities?" in general university discussion....

    Apparently Law A-level is on the LSE's list of what they basically consider to be mickey mouse subjects.

    Why??

    It's not. It doesn't belong with media studies, communication studies, sports studies et al...

    It's a proper, academic subject. Surely people can back me up on this? When I was at school and college I was considered to be one of the highest achievers, usually coming top or near the top grades-wise. I did law A-level and found it highly challenging; a truly intellectual subject. I also learned a lot of very useful and highly relevant information about English law, the criminal justice system, and even philosophy.

    The LSE should be ashamed of themselves!
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    I've heard that most unis don't like students having law a-level because it's irrelevant/detracts from how they teach the subject or something but i don't do law/work in admissions at a uni so i'm not entirely sure

    None of the 'smart' people do law at my school (not that i know of anyway), coupled with business studies (btec award), etc mainly
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    Well people who have never done it know very little about it. In my experience, only the "smart people" were able to keep up with the pace of law A-level, let alone achieve the top grades.

    I found it more difficult than my other A-levels, and trust me, I am one of "the smart people".
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    Although I never took Law A-level, the attitude does piss me off a little bit. I can accept that it may inconveniently mould a persons study and learning method, but I do think that it must give some indication of the core facts of the subjext, hence would indicate a preference or dislike for law. Surely this must be a good thing..
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    It's not just LSE, i was told at Cam they prefer you not to do law.

    The reason isn't just regarding quasi- "highly challenging" but more because it "nconveniently mould a persons study and learning method" as mentioned by laces; many uni's prefer to teach law afresh just like other subjects such as eco.
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    You have to unlearn everything you did at A-level in many subjects though! All the admissions tutors I've ever spoken to for English Lit have said that they have to get rid of all your bad A-level habits and teach you to do things completely differently in your first year. You still have to have the A-level.

    Prejudice against law A-level is just admissions tutors being stuck in their ways and suspicious of anything "newfangled".
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    And you mentioned economics......that's not a subject that appears on their mickey mouse list! So why does law? It is absolutely incomparable to most of the other subjects on that list, but they've all been tarred with the same brush.
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    If you have read the LSE prospectus then you will know that Law A level is acceptable if you have two other 'academic' A level subjects.
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    (Original post by susiemakemeblue)
    And you mentioned economics......that's not a subject that appears on their mickey mouse list!
    He didn't say that, read his post again.
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    I know he didn't, that's why I said it. They *prefer* economists not to have done economics A-level, but it's not included on the list of subjects that are so worthless they have to be accompanied by two "proper" subjects, is it?

    Law is an "academic" subject. More so than French, actually. This is from my experience of having done both.
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    (Original post by susiemakemeblue)
    I know he didn't, that's why I said it. They *prefer* economists not to have done economics A-level
    No, they prefer students not to offer Econ and Bus St TOGETHER, on their own it's fine (or for Bus St accompanied with two other 'academic' subjects). :cool:
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    (Original post by susiemakemeblue)
    Well people who have never done it know very little about it. In my experience, only the "smart people" were able to keep up with the pace of law A-level, let alone achieve the top grades.

    I found it more difficult than my other A-levels, and trust me, I am one of "the smart people".
    I know exactly what you mean!
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    Its soooo true that only the really smart or very hard working people did well in law a-level. another thing that was noticed was that in law very few people would end up getting B grades or high C grades in it. The reason was that you either 'knew' it (not only facts but also the AO2 critically evaluated stuff) or you didnt hence why people got either A grades or C or D/E grades.

    I hate the descrimination metted out by some universities for law as you have to be pretty damn good in your analytical skills to get anywhere with it.

    Mandeep
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    Universities have no preference to law a level because it has pros and cons. It's a hard a level and teaches you analytical/research etc skills which will really help. However it is poorly taught, ie most teachers who teach it don't have a law degree. this then menas that bad and incorect habits and knowledge is passed on which is hard to eradicate at a later date.

    So universities recognise it can make their job easier and harder in differeent ways therefore it is accepted but not necessary
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    Some unis have issues with certain A Levels but if they do have an issue they tend to make it very clear.
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    (Original post by susiemakemeblue)
    Just been reading the thread "What's wrong with new universities?" in general university discussion....

    Apparently Law A-level is on the LSE's list of what they basically consider to be mickey mouse subjects.

    Why??

    It's not. It doesn't belong with media studies, communication studies, sports studies et al...

    It's a proper, academic subject. Surely people can back me up on this? When I was at school and college I was considered to be one of the highest achievers, usually coming top or near the top grades-wise. I did law A-level and found it highly challenging; a truly intellectual subject. I also learned a lot of very useful and highly relevant information about English law, the criminal justice system, and even philosophy.

    The LSE should be ashamed of themselves!

    By all accounts, people who did media studies etc. found that very challenging - if you find it offensive for people to say law is easy, surely you can empathise with the people you may have just offended?

    I was always told that universities prefer their law students not to do law a level because it's not essential and then everyone starts from the same level. That's not to say it's not challenging, just that it's not necessary for a law degree.
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    (Original post by susiemakemeblue)
    The LSE should be ashamed of themselves!
    Indeed. And not ust for their shambolic admissions policy.

    (Original post by Tiantang)
    It's not just LSE, i was told at Cam they prefer you not to do law.
    MC Ren said it was most unis. It is just these two that have anything against law A-level.
    I havnt done a law A-level so I am not in a position to comment on its difficulty, and whether it really is like "media studies".
    It does show a (fairly long-held) interest in the law.
    It does act as a filter. If you hate the A-level, then perhaps law isnt for you afterall.
    It does ground you in the basic principles of law.

    (Original post by Xanthe)
    If you have read the LSE prospectus then you will know that Law A level is acceptable if you have two other 'academic' A level subjects.
    Which is no doubt why they tell you at the open day that they "prefer you not to have law A-level"! The admissions tutors clearly have a bias against it. If two identical candidates came along, but one was taking Law A-level instead of economics, he would be disciriminated against on that count...

    (Original post by Xanthe)
    No, they prefer students not to offer Econ and Bus St TOGETHER, on their own it's fine (or for Bus St accompanied with two other 'academic' subjects).
    Her point still stands.
    You cant have Law A-level to study law at uni.
    You can have Economics A-level to study economics at A-level.
    :rolleyes:

    (Original post by allisandro)
    By all accounts, people who did media studies etc. found that very challenging - if you find it offensive for people to say law is easy, surely you can empathise with the people you may have just offended?
    By all accounts, people who did chemistry found that very challenging...

    I didnt do law A-level (and by the sound of it neither did you), so I cant comment on whether law is difficult or easy. But that argument doesnt really stand either way...

    Everything else has been covered by Suzy [I guess the title of this thread really refers to me! :cool: :confused: ].
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    By all accounts, people who did chemistry found that very challenging...

    I didnt do law A-level (and by the sound of it neither did you), so I cant comment on whether law is difficult or easy. But that argument doesnt really stand either way...

    Everything else has been covered by Suzy [I guess the title of this thread really refers to me! :cool: :confused: ].
    I don't really understand your point here...what i was saying was that most universities don't encourage potential law students to take law a level not because it is too easy, but because it is not really relevant to the degree course.
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    It cant be for that reason.

    My a levels werent really relevant to the degree course. Yes I blabbered on in my personal statement about just how relevant they are but come on...!

    the unis loved my combination of Maths, Eng lit, French and Physics (economics AS). Much of that was entirely irrelavent to study for an LLB!
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    It cant be for that reason.

    My a levels werent really relevant to the degree course. Yes I blabbered on in my personal statement about just how relevant they are but come on...!

    the unis loved my combination of Maths, Eng lit, French and Physics (economics AS). Much of that was entirely irrelavent to study for an LLB!
    That's what i mean! A law a level isn't necessary for the law degree. from the university's point of view it's often easier to start everyone from scratch. Therefore it is beneficial from the student to take something like history or english where they learn to study evidence, argue different courses, write essays etc.
 
 
 

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