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    Hi there,
    we're just having sixth form induction days after finishing GCSE exams and i was wondering is further maths a good AS level to have?
    I was planning on doing:
    Maths, chemistry, physics, history and further maths (providing i got an A* in maths for GCSE) and dropping further maths for A2, but after seeing the workload for these subjects i think it might be too much?? Maths and physics have always been my strongest subjects, but i dont think i will do a degree in maths. More likely to be physics or engineering
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    I would check the entrance requirements if they want or encourage you to have AS/A-level further maths.

    I have a few friends that applied for a maths, physics, and engineering courses are university. All of them have AS further maths, they still got an offer,as the uni's they applied to encourage them to have it, while some only need AS instead of A2/A-level further maths.
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    (Original post by lucasharrison)
    Hi there,
    we're just having sixth form induction days after finishing GCSE exams and i was wondering is further maths a good AS level to have?
    I was planning on doing:
    Maths, chemistry, physics, history and further maths (providing i got an A* in maths for GCSE) and dropping further maths for A2, but after seeing the workload for these subjects i think it might be too much?? Maths and physics have always been my strongest subjects, but i dont think i will do a degree in maths. More likely to be physics or engineering
    Further maths is certainly a good AS level to have, especially if you're intending to do a degree with a high maths content such as physics or engineering. Physics in particular relies heavily on calculus.
    However, further maths (edexcel at least) isn't simply a variation of the maths A-Level, it's a whole new A-Level which assumes knowledge of standard maths before you start. For this reason it might be better to do the further maths AS in your second year and use the free slot to do AS+A2 standard maths A-Level in the same year.
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    If your thinking physics or eingineering in particular then further maths is pretty much a must. If you don't do it then when you come to apply they will ask why and you will need to have a good response
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    do A2 further maths for a subject like that it will be much more useful than history
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    doing history because im just as good at that as i am at maths ( even tho im not so good at english ) and i thought universities liked to see a different subject rather than all the same sort
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    i think it would be usefull.

    I never got questioned why i hadn't done it, i don't think uni's expect it because not every place offers it.

    But for certain degrees like maths and i think economics then they are very, very keen on it.

    Its allways going to be very usefull.
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    thanks for the replies, i know it would be useful, but is it essential for a physics/engineering based course? id rather get good grades with 4 AS levels and 3 A levels then not so good grades for 5 AS and 4 A levels
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    no not essential but will help your first year alot if you have dont further maths, also even tho its not essential if you have it and somebody else doesnt i think the tutors will prob give the place to the further maths first, well for eng or phy anyway. maybe not true but i dunno
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    (Original post by lucasharrison)
    doing history because im just as good at that as i am at maths ( even tho im not so good at english ) and i thought universities liked to see a different subject rather than all the same sort
    do the courses you want to do forget the uni they can take you for what you are yoiu have to enjoy the courses you are doing, two years is a ong time to do something you dont like.
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    (Original post by lucasharrison)
    thanks for the replies, i know it would be useful, but is it essential for a physics/engineering based course? id rather get good grades with 4 AS levels and 3 A levels then not so good grades for 5 AS and 4 A levels
    Further maths is useful. However, it depends if the uni's requirements want the further maths. If it doesn't say you need it, you don't have to take it if you don't want to. I checked some uni's requirements and some encourages you to have further maths, while some need it up to AS or A2. I would check the entrance requirements for the uni's you want to go to.
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    If u r sure u definitely want to do physics or engineering then my advice would be to drop the history and do further maths - this will show universities you are committed and you'll be more comfortable in your first year at uni. I have a feeling that part of the reason Oxford rejected me was that most of my 'competitors' would have had further maths and i didnt (although this might just be me over-analysing).

    I am doing physics at york this year and am wishing i chose further maths instead of english (which i chose because I enjoyed it and i wanted balance) becos first year physics at uni is teaching all the maths you wil need on the course... i would be so much more comfrotable if i had already done most of it at a-level.

    On the other hand, you might be like i was at the end of my GCSEs and wasnt really sure whether you were an arts or sciences person, and choose a balance that doesnt shut anything off. As it happens im doing Physphil so a lack of further maths wasn't as important than if i had just one straight physics - but i still wish i'd done it over english.

    My brother's having the same trouble as you at the moment - he's pretty sure he's a chemistry sciency person but he cant drop history cos he enjoyed it so much at GCSE.

    Basically, what im saying is completely opposite to iceberg - you should do the A-levels that give you the biggest advantage for the uni course you really want to do. But if you dont know what this is yet, then take iceberg's advice.
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    History's the sort of thing you can do yourself just by reading - an interest. Maths you really need to be taught if you need it.
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    (Original post by schrodingerscat)
    History's the sort of thing you can do yourself just by reading - an interest. Maths you really need to be taught if you need it.
    It's possible to teach yourself maths but you need to sit down and read the theory then answer questions - it's simply not productive to 'vaguely know something' so if you're going to sit down and learn it then you may as well take the exams.
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    (Original post by lucasharrison)
    thanks for the replies, i know it would be useful, but is it essential for a physics/engineering based course? id rather get good grades with 4 AS levels and 3 A levels then not so good grades for 5 AS and 4 A levels
    Put it this way: To do Physics at Cambridge (NatSci), Further Maths will do as a replacement for Physics!

    Is it a essential? Probably not. Is it dead good? You bet.
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    I did history instead of fast track maths this year! It was the biggest mistake that I made; I enjoyed history but it has nothing to do with what I want to do at university.

    I managed to transfer to fast track to do further maths next yr as well as complete my A2 in regular maths. I'd say go for the further maths if you want to do a degree in physics/engineering; it'll prepare you for your course better and will compliment your other subjects. Don't make the same mistake I did and turn round at the end of AS and kick yourself!
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    If your school offers further maths and you choose not to take it, it might be held against you if you apply for physics or engineering at a top university, where most applicants will have done it because the courses are heavily maths-based. My advice would be to start off with the 5 ASs and then drop one if it's too much work.
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    Further Maths I would encourage, it would enable you to do potentially the FP's along with 3 extra mechanics modules, which would be invaluable for a physics/engineering degree.

    I want to go to uni to study maths, because I really enjoy doing maths, that's why I am doing as much as I can currently...If you love physics/engineering, I suggest you do the same...

    I would recommend starting with 5 though, at my school starting with 5 meant you didn't have to do general studies, was convincing enough for me :p:
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    Well maths and further maths is a must have i think.
    If u do choose to do further maths with maths then u will finish most of the AS and A2 maths at the end of the first year. and if u choose to drop further maths then u might ahve already got ur A2 maths result by December.
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    For Engineering, Maths, Physics and Computer Science related degrees, Further Maths will put you at an advantage.
 
 
 

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