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    (Original post by yawn)
    If you are interested enough in the teaching of highly able children, I can recommend some fascinating reading material - you should be able to get them from your local library, with the exception, possibly, of the Ofsted one.

    'Able Children in Ordinary Schools' - Deborah Eyre ISBN 1-85346-441-4

    'Educating the Very Able - current international research' - Ofsted reviews of research ISBN 0-11-350100-5

    'Highly Able Children' - Education and Employment Committee (3rd Report) ISBN 0-10-226099-0
    Thanks. I'll look into them.
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Yes, there's a ceiling, at both GCSE and A level. I've dropped several grades in one A level because of it.
    Lazy man's excuse. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Firstly, I have to say that your teachers are bang out of order; what was said to you should never have been said. I don't do art - but alot of my friends do and I often went with them at Lunch, to talk with them whilst they worked on their art peices... There were teachers there and they were always pressuring people to go further, regardless of whether they were doing 'sufficient' or not. So, I can't agree with your statement that teachers say - this seems to be based on what is exercised at your school alone - which I must say is outrageous.

    I myself am moving on to AS-Levels next year, and agree with you; I will find most of the modules at AS rather tedious and boring. I've been doing preperation work for Chemistry and Biology already and the work seems fairly simple, to speak the truth. But like I've said before, the majority of the population will be challanged by AS-Levels.
    The art department at my school is one of the best departments in the school, it works very hard to get people through A - C boundaries, they do push people. They push me to produce the work the syllabus wants me to produce, so that they can get me a high A grade, but they don't really seem to be able to think outside the box. In the run up to the GCSE exam they became the most useful to me because my teacher came to understand me and my work alot better. But it was a struggle before that. I don't really think that this is different to any where else.

    When I asked him, it was fine for the level I was working at, I don't think in other schools they try and push people beyond the realms of the expected level for their age. As far as my teacher was concerned, what I was doing was fine for my age, but I do agree with you, I was annoyed afterwards, I shouldn't have been told it was fine just because its sufficient for that level, because I want to achieve the best, but they have a different aim to what you have - as I say, they can't think out of the box.

    The thing is, the biggest challenge for me at AS art looks like trying to get my teacher to understand me. Otherwise I'll end up dropping it, I won't find it forfilling at all. If I don't enjoy the course the work I produce will be terrible and my moral will drop (as it always does when I start producing crap) I can feel the ceiling at AS already.

    But thinking about it, its just a case of filling assesment objectives, I think its the way thats got to be done that can be a little restrictive, but if you find a way of doing it, you should be able to be as brilliant as you want to be, but it's also the way the courses are fasioned. They're designed to help a person at 'this' level develop. but if a persons not at that level either above it or below it, it can be restrictive. I guess you have to put up with it but I think it needs looking at.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Lazy man's excuse. :rolleyes:
    Try to avoid being stupid. Five proper A levels hardly seems 'lazy'.
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    My college has quite a few... individual subjects have "Gifted and Talented" sessions, but these are generally poorly-planned, and fizzled out towards the end of the year anyway. Then, the "Oxbridge List", everyone with the grades to get there, or that has otherwise expressed an interest: no elitism from us here. Then, for some reason, is the legendary "Eight List"... a list (get this) of all people who have an 8-point average at GCSE. This list is of absolutely no consequence whatsoever. Perhaps we have a secret bathroom somewhere, but if this is the case I have yet to be informed.
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Try to avoid being stupid. Five proper A levels hardly seems 'lazy'.
    Try again. I think you'll find your the stupid one. You shot yourself in the foot by saying that the ceiling at A-Levels meant that some of your grades suffered. :rolleyes: If you had said that the sheer amount of work affected your grades then that would've been better - but I'd still say your stupid for biting off more than you can chew. Oh well. We learn from our mistakes, or so they say. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Try again. I think you'll find your the stupid one. You shot yourself in the foot by saying that the ceiling at A-Levels meant that some of your grades suffered. :rolleyes: If you had said that the sheer amount of work affected your grades then that would've been better - but I'd still say your stupid for biting off more than you can chew. Oh well. We learn from our mistakes, or so they say. :rolleyes:
    Here's a mistake you can learn from.
    It's you're not your.
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    (Original post by Widowmaker)
    Here's a mistake you can learn from.
    It's you're not your.
    I'm a quick typer - what can I say. Mistakes happen, some easier than others. Get over it.
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    Widomaker: Last Activity: 1 Minute Ago 04:30 PM
    Giving Reputation - 1 Minute Ago

    Gifted Students 19-07-2005 04:31 PM : hmm, too argumentative for my liking

    Rest assured, neg rep is on its way to you.

    BTW:
    hate football
    Talking of mistakes; since when was "hate football" an interest? Unless you meant that an interest of yours is to hate football? In that case I'd have to say that you should've typed "hating football".

    I can be pedantic as well, you know. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Widomaker: Last Activity: 1 Minute Ago 04:30 PM
    Giving Reputation - 1 Minute Ago

    Gifted Students 19-07-2005 04:31 PM : hmm, too argumentative for my liking

    Rest assured, neg rep is on its way to you.

    BTW:

    Talking of mistakes; since when was "hate football" an interest? Unless you meant that an interest of yours is to hate football? In that case I'd have to say that you should've typed "hating football".

    I can be pedantic as well, you know. :rolleyes:
    lol, it's hardly going to make much difference to my overall reputation.
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    (Original post by Widowmaker)
    lol, it's hardly going to make much difference to my overall reputation.
    It hasn't made any difference to mine either.
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    (Original post by Widowmaker)
    lol, it's hardly going to make much difference to my overall reputation.
    I might add; is your shift key stuck? Learn to use correct punctuation.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    I might add; is your shift key stuck? Learn to use correct punctuation.
    Do you like my new and significantly improved sig? :p:
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    (Original post by Widowmaker)
    Do you like my new and significantly improved sig? :p:
    Hmm... I can see punctuation mistakes; so no. Also, it would've been better if the quote was actually real, not made up. I can do the same, but I'm a bit more mature.
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    Yeah, we've got a "Gifted and Talented" scheme, run by the LEA. One for sports, and one for academia. It usually involves University Trips and Lectures.

    Anything else, is organised from within the school. ie. My Head of Year has picked me to attend Oxford University and Cambridge lectures, and I've been to Strasbourg to visit the European Parliament, and am going to Paris this September.

    I'm on the Schools Parliament too, as well as the School Council, so I do stuff because of that.

    But generally, "Gifted and Talented" is where it's at. It's not all that good. *shrugs*.
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    (Original post by Whizz Kid)
    Try again. I think you'll find your the stupid one. You shot yourself in the foot by saying that the ceiling at A-Levels meant that some of your grades suffered. :rolleyes: If you had said that the sheer amount of work affected your grades then that would've been better - but I'd still say your stupid for biting off more than you can chew. Oh well. We learn from our mistakes, or so they say. :rolleyes:
    Maybe you ought to wait until you've actually done some A levels before passing judgement? I've had repeated meetings with my teachers, I've seen my exam papers, I know why I got those grades. As for biting off more than I can chew, well, if I were to go back and start all over again, I think I'd still take my five A levels. But that is another discussion, belonging in another thread.
    Back to G and T, do people think that the most able students ought to have special things - trips, meetings, etc. - organised for them? Surely the less able students have more need of the time/money/other resources?
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    At my old school we had G&T which was about 30 people. All I got out of 3 years of being on it was the chance to go to summer school at the end of year 11 it was totally pointless. At college we don't have one though once we had a presentation about applying to Oxbridge that anyone could go to and then there was going to be further Oxbridge talks for anyone a GCSE points average of 6.5 or higher but I don't think that went ahead
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Maybe you ought to wait until you've actually done some A levels before passing judgement? I've had repeated meetings with my teachers, I've seen my exam papers, I know why I got those grades. As for biting off more than I can chew, well, if I were to go back and start all over again, I think I'd still take my five A levels. But that is another discussion, belonging in another thread.
    Back to G and T, do people think that the most able students ought to have special things - trips, meetings, etc. - organised for them? Surely the less able students have more need of the time/money/other resources?
    Hah! :rolleyes:
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    At my school (in Scotland) we have a "very able pupils' policy" and a "very able pupils' club". Originally it was called "able pupils' club/policy" but this kicked up a big fuss as it suggested that those pupils who were not in the club were not "able".

    The club is accessible only by invitation, which are given out based on prelim scores and Cognitive Ability Tests. Once you're in you never have to re-qualify as it were. Basically what happens is the school, at the start of the year, expect all the departments to plan some kind of seminar/presentation designed to stimulate the very able pupils. Occasionally guest speakers are booked. Those pupils in the club are given a list of all the seminars planned for the year ahead and a brief description of what they entail. The pupils then indicate which of the seminars they wish to attend. Attendance is not mandatory.

    The main problem with the system we have is it does not take into consideration people who excel in only one or two subjects.
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    (Original post by smeets)
    The main problem with the system we have is it does not take into consideration people who excel in only one or two subjects.
    I think our A and T scheme is supposed to combat that - the Talented group consists of those with exceptional abilities in a particular area, while the Able is for generally high quality students. But Oxbridge presentations and things were open to everyone, though I imagine that anyone who had virtually no chance of getting in would be strongly discouraged from applying.
 
 
 

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