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idiopathic
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#1
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does anyone know how you could work for organisations such as World Health Organisation or the Human Genome Project?

also is Medical Physics an actual degree as opposed to Medicine or can you specialise in medicalphyscis after medical school?
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Brown Patrick Bateman
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(Original post by _Devour_You)
does anyone know how you could work for organisations such as World Health Organisation or the Human Genome Project?
Cos the likes of WHO are so globally renouned I'd expect it to be bloody difficult, thousands of applicants etc. For UN which is similar demand-wise, we were told you've basically got no chance unless you have the right contacts :mad:
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mjf
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(Original post by Jools)
Cos the likes of WHO are so globally renouned I'd expect it to be bloody difficult, thousands of applicants etc. For UN which is similar demand-wise, we were told you've basically got no chance unless you have the right contacts :mad:
I would say that that probably is the case for the high flying jobs - you need to be known in certain circles and you would probably be approached. But that isnt to say that it cant be done - just start your networking early and make sure people know your ambitions!
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Lucy
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(Original post by _Devour_You)
also is Medical Physics an actual degree as opposed to Medicine or can you specialise in medicalphyscis after medical school?
I went to this lecture once where the lecturer (Kevin Fong) first did a degree in Astrophysics and then entered the graduate programme at medical school. During his studies he got approached by NASA, how cool is that ! "Medical physics" is his hobby now, but he pretty much specialises in it (as well as working as an SHO at a hospital). Generally speaking though (i.e. if you are not a genius like him), I think you go through medical school and try to get involved in medical physics through special study modules etc.
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KrisMB
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Hiya, i can't be to sure on this one because i choose nursing instead of medicine, dont ask why but i did, and i think why you graduate as a Dr, your called a physisist, this just come from the doctor status i think,
SORRY lol i've just got what your asking you said medical physics didn't you sorry, i'm still postingthis for the humour but oh sorry lol
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shiny
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(Original post by _Devour_You)
does anyone know how you could work for organisations such as World Health Organisation or the Human Genome Project?

also is Medical Physics an actual degree as opposed to Medicine or can you specialise in medicalphyscis after medical school?
Medical Physicists in the UK are part of the group known as "Clinical Scientists" within the NHS. There is information at the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine at www.ipem.org.uk about how to become one. The training programme is unrelated to that undertaken by those training to become medical doctors and is only people qualified in Physics and Engineering.
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sashh
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Also known as "professionals alied to Medicine"

Are you sure you understand what 'medical physics' means. It can be a broad range covering things like radiation protection, biomedical instrumentation, etc.

It also sometimes crosses over with Physiological Measurement. Try this site

http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/careers.../physical.html

You can either complete a degree and then start work or you can work and study day release. The level of award you progress to will depend on your NHS trust. Some only fund you to the level of HNC but others will fund you to degree level, although this applies more to the physiological measurement side.

Don't think day release is an easy option, the college day is often 9am to 9pm and then you have to study at home.

Advantages - work experience and a sallery.

Disadvantage - no uni social life.
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shiny
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You will find that Clinical Scientists now have their own category and are no longer known as "professions allied to medicine" within the NHS.
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jacie
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#9
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(Original post by _Devour_You)
does anyone know how you could work for organisations such as World Health Organisation or the Human Genome Project?

also is Medical Physics an actual degree as opposed to Medicine or can you specialise in medicalphyscis after medical school?
If you are interested in research i think molecular medicine at Sussex is a great course! Its aimed for going into medical research and from what i can gather contains most of the science of medicine but without the clinical aspect. You can also opt for a sandwich year where you could try and work in the industry maybe doing something genome related?
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