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    (Original post by viviki)
    The point is that the consequences of a doctor being incredibly rude and having a crap manner potentially has far more serious consequences than that of a grumpy waitress.
    As a matter of fact I did complain about the one doctor to the surgery (I sent in a letter complaining) and as far as I'm aware they didn't do a bloody thing about it I certainly didn't hear anything back but then I was 16 and didn't follow stuff up as I would if I had that treatment now. The point is that you shouldn't have to complain. I'm not saying all doctors are bad but you seem to be implying that they are all perfect which you have to know is ********.
    There hasn't been an implication that we are all perfect.
    IF someone started a thread ranting about how many people from Pakistan they had met who were complete gits, and everyone joined in with tales of pakistani gits they had met then no one would question some pakistanis turning up and defending both themselves and their countrymen - despite knowing that some will indeed by gits.

    Now do you see?
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    I must be really lucky, never had a bad word to say about the docs ive seen, and the ones ive seen with a friend were especially nice, navy docs as well (gave me a free rugby shirt ) . And my nan has seen squillions of docs and nurses etc and they were all fab and couldnt do enough to help her.

    Dentists on the other hand... my ortho was great, sang along to the radio whilst drilling my teeth :rolleyes: but ive have dentists who were really rough, even when I was a kid, didnt seem to understand that when i said i was in pain i wasnt lying

    I personally think on the most part they do a good job with what they have available, yeh ur gunna get the ones that arnt so nice, grumpy etc but you find that ever where in life
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    (Original post by * gemchicken *)
    Helenia, maybe you could answer my question as Fluffy hasn't.

    Now I'm not insulting doctors, or anything like that, but if you read my post before you'd see my Mam suffered 6 months of pain in her abdomen which turned out to be massive tumours on both her ovaries. In that 6 months, 7 out of the 8 doctors she saw, did not physically examine her. The 8th doctor she saw got her straight on the bed, felt her abdomen and sent her to hospital immediately.

    Right, if you have a patient come and see you with abdominal pains, wouldn't you examine their abdomen to see if you can feel anything? I was just wondering if she'd had the bad luck of getting 7 crap doctors, of whether these days doctors are trained differently? I just thought it would be common sense to have a feel of her abdomen?!

    Ok, i have replied, but will do so again to make it clearer.
    Now they may have caught it a bit earlier if they had been a bit mroe vigilant, but they would certainly not have spotted it in may, prob not till sep at least.
    http://www.vh.org/adult/provider/ana...ection/23.html
    That showws you where the ovaries lie in the abdo. You'll notice its behind all the bowel, and of course the abdominal wall muscles.

    Now when someone puts their hand on your tummy, and you are hurting, you tense those muscles which makes it incredibly hard to feel anything, let alone try and palpate the ovaries.

    This is what i mean about people criticiing something they don't understand. Its not like TV - docs won't do a quick exam and test and immediately know the cause, and likewise if one doc missed something and another spotted it it doesn't necessarily mean a failing on the side of the doc. (tho at times there is, and you'd be amazed at how often colleagues either 'dob' or send a letter to them to point out how stupid they were)
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    I think she's being unnecessarily aggressive.
    Why for sticking up for my future profession and the institution I've given a lot up to become a part of?

    Or would you rather student doctors didn't give a rats ass?
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9&postcount=76

    Lovely ward - S4!
    Yes, i was already aware that you have been a mental health inpatient. However the psych hospitals are entirely different environment to real ones, to such an extent that you can sometimes forget in psych that you are in a hospital.
    I did chuckle at the 'who do u think knows this patient best' bit, because its not just about knowing them and their past. But are you qualified to pick up those little throw away comments, gestures, grimaces etc that all point at diagnoses, and in turn help evaluate what meds to put them on.

    And, um, no offence, but if i had just started seeing a girl and she mentioned she had schizoaffective I'd run a mile too...
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    (Original post by KerChing)
    thats the only reason why i had to go the doc TWICE in the last 4 years... and it really pissed me off when they jus said there is no treatment... sadly i also knew the reason why :mad:
    it annoyed me, but at same time i knew it was right thing for him to do.
    afterall, dont wanna get like america where they give out antibiotics like candy, and as a consequence have rampant bacterial resistance.
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    (Original post by nasht)
    you guys watch "House", man that doctor is smart ass but really rude.
    I really wanna see that but don't have a TV.
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Yes, i was already aware that you have been a mental health inpatient. However the psych hospitals are entirely different environment to real ones, to such an extent that you can sometimes forget in psych that you are in a hospital.
    I did chuckle at the 'who do u think knows this patient best' bit, because its not just about knowing them and their past. But are you qualified to pick up those little throw away comments, gestures, grimaces etc that all point at diagnoses, and in turn help evaluate what meds to put them on.

    And, um, no offence, but if i had just started seeing a girl and she mentioned she had schizoaffective I'd run a mile too...
    Then that's quite tragic. If members of the medical profession are prejudiced against someone with a mental illness that can be controlled with an atypical neuroleptic, then what hope is there for the general public? And these diagnoses are often fairly arbitrary. Some people's diagnoses are changed when they move to a different area, for example, or even when they change consultants. The art of medicine.

    I know people who have suffered from mental illnesses in the past and are now medical students.
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    I've had some fantastic doctors. My old GP in London was so comforting and i got to know her really well. She understood me and knew that if i said i wasn't well that i was probably really ill because it took me a lot to go to the doctors. She fought my corner and helped me get into university by supporting my application. When i was 16 she told me she thought i needed to move away from home. I refused and applied to uni's near home. It was only when i ended up in hospital and had to reapply to uni's that i realised she'd been right all along.

    Since then i've had some doctors who were rude and abrasive. I have had asthma since i was about 3, but it wasn't diagnosed until i was about 13 and i changed surgeries.

    I met a ***** of a psychiatrist last year who thought she was gods gift. I wasn't having any of it. Once i told her i was going to complain about her she changed her tune. I found it hard to stand up to her, but i had the support of my mum and the other patients (who also thought she was a *****) and eventually i felt more satisfied about my treatment.

    Every good/bad doctor i meet reminds me of just how much i want to do it, and what i should/shouldn't do.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Why for sticking up for my future profession and the institution I've given a lot up to become a part of?

    Or would you rather student doctors didn't give a rats ass?
    No, for invalidating other people's distressing experiences.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)

    I know people who have suffered from mental illnesses in the past and are now medical students.
    :hello:
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    I know people who have suffered from mental illnesses in the past and are now medical students.
    :ciao:
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    Then that's quite tragic. If members of the medical profession are prejudiced against someone with a mental illness that can be controlled with an atypical neuroleptic, then what hope is there for the general public? And these diagnoses are often fairly abitrary. Some people's diagnoses are changed when they move to a different area, for example, or even when they change consultants. The art of medicine.

    I know people who have suffered from mental illnesses in the past and are now medical students.
    Controlled with an atypical yes, but for how long, and what about the effect when it stops working or there is loss of compliance? Plus there is the dementive effects of chronic schizophrenia.
    If i was just started going out with someone and i found out then yeh i would break things off. If i was properly serious about them then that would be a diff matter.

    One of the schizoaffectives on my ward who is 'being controlled' by clozapine - which im sure you know is the strongest atypical about still believes her husbnad is a rapist, a murderer, having affairs etc (poor guy has visited her every night for last 10 years), is convinced she has over 50 children, believes she has a heart attack every other day and recently tried to stab someone for 'stealing her baby'.
    Anyone in health services who isn't a bit prejudiced is, frankly, a liar.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    :hello:
    Good for you! I'm sure you'll have a lot more empathy than most of your colleagues.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    :ciao:
    yah but theres mental illnesses...and then theres mental illnesses.

    Crikey i know loads of medics who've had various things from eating disorders, depression to personality disorders.
    But I would certainly be concerned if i found any of my colleagues had suffered long term psychotic illness.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    Good for you! I'm sure you'll have a lot more empathy than most of your colleagues.

    I bloody hope so. I have to take something positive from what i've been through. I'm determined everything i went through wasn't in vain. Lots of medical students have preconceptions about mental illness, but from what i've seen at my uni at least, they are trying to educate people to be much more open minded. Time will tell i guess.
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    yah but theres mental illnesses...and then theres mental illnesses.

    Not sure how to take that :p:

    Are you saying - an ED isn't the same as being long term psychotic,
    or
    are you saying that I'm mad?

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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    Good for you! I'm sure you'll have a lot more empathy than most of your colleagues.
    Yeah, the rest of us are all evil hard-nosed witches :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Not sure how to take that :p:

    Are you saying - an ED isn't the same as being long term psychotic,
    or
    are you saying that I'm mad?

    Eating disorder is a terrible burden and has awful effects on quality of life, health etc, plus has higher comorbid depression, suicide and anxiety rates.
    Psychotic illnesses like schizophrenia not only affect yourself, but those around you. By their very nature these people tend to become delusional, and although insight may at times be good, it will invariabley be poorer at other times.
    I would be concerned about anyone in a position of power like a doctor to be a strong risk of delusions...

    Plus theres the dementing effects of schizophrenia - a trait which in times gone past was used to differentiate between it and mania i might add.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yeah, the rest of us are all evil hard-nosed witches :rolleyes:
    Hell, I'm empathic as they come, I feel terribley for some of the patients i meet and their families, and have nothing but sympathy for most patients.
    But if i was having a one night stand and found a colostomy bag then yes i'd think twice. And yes, i'd think twice about STARTING up a serious relationship with someone with a long term major mental illness.
 
 
 
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