Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I suppose people are seeing more attractive career options in the media and entertainment, especially with the celebrity obsession explosion in the last few years (reality TV anyone? :p: ) and might see a degree in these 'soft' options as a fast route into a more lucrative career. There's definitely a lot more scope for imagination with this kind of career path than the holders of more scientific degrees, and more should be done to make people informed of careers relating to the latter.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    [COLOR=Black]
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    To be honest though, doing American Studies really isnt any different than doing a degree in English and History
    I just used American Studies as an example as edders used it in the first post
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by * gemchicken *)
    [COLOR=Black]

    I just used American Studies as an example as edders used it in the first post
    I know. I wasn't having a go, I was just saying
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    I know. I wasn't having a go, I was just saying
    That's OK I thought you were too
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by * gemchicken *)
    But, also, people who do media will still have to pay their student loan back so really people doing physics won't be paying for them.
    Tuition fees are nowhere near close enough to cover the cost of higher education courses, that's why most of our unis are severely underfunded and the government has had to bring in top-up fees. A large proportion of the additional costs are met by the tax payer.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    but what I'm saying is people who study subjects that aren't science will still have to pay back their student loan!
    Degree courses are heavily subsidised - why else do you think there is such a discrepency between what foreigners and uk residents pay?

    review of university expenditure done in 1997 used to stop excessive and uncontrolled growth in student numbers (plus inflation)).
    Well Tony Blair won't take any notice of that!
    How is maths a part lab course?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Miles)
    Tuition fees are nowhere near close enough to cover the cost of higher education courses, that's why most of our unis are severely underfunded and the government has had to bring in top-up fees. A large proportion of the additional costs are met by the tax payer.
    I was just about to make the same point.

    I didn't really want this discussion to revert to the 'mickey mouse' courses debate. Just wanted thoughts about how we could make science appealing. It's an EU-wide problem.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    He initiated it :confused:
    Ahh, sorry for the confusion then. I generally thought that Tony Blair wanted to promote an excess of students entering university.

    I assume the extra expentiture is on the pretty complex computers/software that many mathematicians use/are taught to use while at university.
    I suppose though I thought the vast majority of the software would run on standard desktops and everywhere has those.

    With regards to the topic title - I agree with the suggestion of exposing students to current exciting research.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    Current Base Unit Price is £3,458 which is only weighted upwards for more expensive subjects and students (post grads and part time students recieve an extra loading)...and includes any tuition fees already assumed to be recieved.
    So currently the tax payer has to foot over £2,000 per student per course before new top up fees, and what about the consequences to the universities of having so many students doing new courses? More admin, more building work, more facilities, more staff...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I would lay part of the blame on unstimulating GCSE science. I attained a rather paltry grade at GCSE despite having A's in almost all the other subjects (I was supposed to get a B....) probably due to the dull and incoherent teaching (my school) and lifeless course content.

    I actually find the astronomy/space aspects of Physics interesting and would liked to have gone into it in more depth, but the course didn't allow for that. GCSE is aimed at teaching basic knowledge of the subject but it doesn't teach about how science can create innovative things of the future. Perhaps they should just show more sci-fi films....

    And I don't think blowing up stuff to look 'cool' will help the subject's future.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    I didn't really want this discussion to revert to the 'mickey mouse' courses debate. Just wanted thoughts about how we could make science appealing. It's an EU-wide problem.
    Yes, sorry. I wrote an artcile for the sBMJ on one of my tutors, Dr. Alice Roberts (some might know her off Time Team as the one with the red hair, but I don't watch it as I can't stand archaeology ) and was talking about a scheme she had set up where "science celebrities" go to secondary and primary schools educating students about the benefits of a science degree/career. Kids were wearing Anatomy T-shirts, it was scary :eek:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    which new courses?
    I can't answer that question without opening up another can of worms, so I won't.

    If a university chooses to expand student numbers beyond 5% of 1997 levels they get financially penalised (and so end up with even less money to pay for more students - not a situation any uni wants to end up in)
    how does this tie in with the labour government's plan of increasing HE to 50%? is this policy meant to indirectly lead to new universities popping up over the place or are they restricting their own targets?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Miles)
    Yes, sorry. I wrote an artcile for the sBMJ on one of my tutors, Dr. Alice Roberts (some might know her off Time Team as the one with the red hair, but I don't watch it as I can't stand archaeology ) and was talking about a scheme she had set up where "science celebrities" go to secondary and primary schools educating students about the benefits of a science degree/career. Kids were wearing Anatomy T-shirts, it was scary :eek:
    That sounds like a pretty good idea, actually. Even better might be if they got ordinary students to go into their local home schools to talk about it, then they could give honest opinions and relate to the kids more.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    just another point

    look at the massive amount of people studying business, and alot studying economics and the likes

    you cannot possibly say that this is an economic disadvantage that business studies is one of the most popular courses in the country

    the country is more likely to prosper economically with 50000 business graduates than with 50000 physics graduates
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PQ)
    Our chemistry dept is running outreach atm with local schools - the current students and postgrads spend an afternoon or two talking to 13, 14, 15 yr olds about chemistry and university life.

    And our maths dept are doing similar in a tutoring scheme which has actually caused a huge increase in the number of our maths graduates applying to become teachers through a PGCE :cool:
    That's excellent, win win! We need more students becoming science undergraduates, and more graduates going into teaching.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by R.J.A)
    the country is more likely to prosper economically with 50000 business graduates than with 50000 physics graduates
    I doubt that, actually. Physicists can use their skills for business, and innovate for the economy.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by edders)
    I doubt that, actually. Physicists can use their skills for business, and innovate for the economy.
    yes, but that business wouldn't be there in the first place if it weren't for accountants, consultants, actuaries etc. (ie. business/economics graduates!)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hm, I disagree. Economically, accountants don't actually make the country wealthier, they just tell us how wealthy we are. Having more and more accountants just means more and more red tape, no? (And I say this as somebody who's just given up his maths degree to do economics)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by homoterror)
    Hm, I disagree. Economically, accountants don't actually make the country wealthier, they just tell us how wealthy we are. Having more and more accountants just means more and more red tape, no? (And I say this as somebody who's just given up his maths degree to do economics)
    no, my point is that the growth of business nationally isn't possible without the services of accountants etc.....
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's a combination of the fact that money in science is pretty hard to come by (even after 20 or so years in academia) and the fact that the subjects themselves are difficult. Why bother getting a degree in a difficult subject if you're just going to end up in the city climbing the greasy pole either way? Are there actually have fewer undergraduates doing science (related) subjects than there used to be, or just a disproportionately small number, given the number of people studying business/management etc? I don't know if it's possible to get more people interested in science, but it can't do any harm to try. The problem is, interest isn't enough - you have to be capable as well (sorry, but it's true). Can you imagine some of the students doing 'new' subjects grappling with theoretical physics or chemistry?!?

    Ben
 
 
 

2,723

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.