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    these are modules from my course of which you pick a selection of them i really doubt they are donkey courses or form the basis of 'pretending to study media':

    YEAR ONE
    8 modules from:
    Introduction to the Moving Image - Part 1*
    Introduction to the Moving Image - Part 2*
    Introduction to Film and Television History*
    Practices and Representations (Double Practical Module)
    Television as Popular Culture
    Race in the Cinema
    Introduction to American Television
    Researching TV Audiences
    Introduction to Hollywood Cinema
    Celebrities in Film and Television
    European Cinema

    YEAR TWO
    8 modules from:
    Critical Approaches in Film and Television Studies (Double Module)*
    Practices and Meanings in Film and Television (Practical Double Module)
    American Youth Cinema
    Horror/Nation
    Art and Artists on Screen
    British Cinema in the Age of Television
    British Television Drama
    American TV in the 1950s and 1960s
    Conflicting Images: News Film and Television
    Film and Narrative Theory
    Youth TV
    Sound and Music in Film and Television
    Work Based Learning in the Creative and Cultural Industries
    Spectatorship and Gender
    Introduction to Scriptwriting

    YEAR THREE
    8 modules from:
    Independent Study (Double Module)*
    Alternative Practices in Film and Television (Practical Double Module)
    Creativity, Self and Gender
    Contemporary American Cinema
    Ethics, Creativity and Representation
    Television and Amercian Identities
    Film and TV Melodrama
    Third Cinema
    Schedules and Margins
    Television and Tourism
    Film in the East (Japan, China and Hong Kong)
    Independent and Avant-Garde Cinema
    Management Experience in the Creative and Cultural Industries
    Advanced Scriptwriting
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    (Original post by devilgirl999)
    these are modules from my course of which you pick a selection of them i really doubt they are donkey courses or form the basis of 'pretending to study media':
    Whilst I do believe that studying the media is valid, producing a list of course titles tells us nothing about content and academic rigour.
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    Bad news for the UK.
    The respected and important subjects are being abandoned.
    This country is on it's way to the dogs, make no mistake.
    Shame - once the greatest country in the world, now I wished I lived elsewhere.
    The past 2 governemnts have wrecked education - it'd have Atlee and that gneration of politician turning in their graves the rubbish public money is used on nowadays.
    Just look through clearing for a laugh. Some of those 'courses' are a disgrace to Britain.
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    (Original post by devilgirl999)
    these are modules from my course of which you pick a selection of them i really doubt they are donkey courses or form the basis of 'pretending to study media':

    YEAR ONE
    8 modules from:
    SNIPPED
    For a train-driving exam they do more than that. I don't see anyone wanted to make it a degree subject.
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    (Original post by InterCity125)
    Bad news for the UK.
    The respected and important subjects are being abandoned.
    This country is on it's way to the dogs, make no mistake.
    Shame - once the greatest country in the world, now I wished I lived elsewhere.
    The past 2 governemnts have wrecked education - it'd have Atlee and that gneration of politician turning in their graves the rubbish public money is used on nowadays.
    Just look through clearing for a laugh. Some of those 'courses' are a disgrace to Britain.
    I have to agree, however it is a complex mess of government, universities and students that have caused this to happen and it will be very difficult to untangle. Dire warnings are coming from both the business world and from the governments own investigators yet little actually seems to be happening.
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    Going back to he origonal thread title, the worrying part of whats goin on, IMHO, is not that the traditional sciences are being lost (personally i think its great, I'm doing a highly technical degree that now has less that 500 graduates a year....... my frikin ticket to a comfortable life), It that modern students are going to uni purely for the sake of going to uni.

    I do not think that psychology is a mickey mouse degree, but you have to ask, is there really the market for 10,000 new psychologists a year, let alone 64,000? the fact of the matter is that, on the whole, the 40% or so of uni students that are there for the sake of a degree, as opposed to the other 60% who are there to improve thier career, generally take the 'ologies and as a result de-value them.

    We do not need to make sciences or engineering more sexy, if there is demand in the real world, then the eligable students with enough brain cells to notice, will fill those places. What we need to fight is the stupid labour plan for 50% of school leavers to enter uni. All this will do is de-value degrees accross the board and make the 'would you like fries with that?' degrees more previlent.
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    (Original post by funkymonkey)
    Going back to he origonal thread title, the worrying part of whats goin on, IMHO, is not that the traditional sciences are being lost (personally i think its great, I'm doing a highly technical degree that now has less that 500 graduates a year....... my frikin ticket to a comfortable life), It that modern students are going to uni purely for the sake of going to uni.

    I do not think that psychology is a mickey mouse degree, but you have to ask, is there really the market for 10,000 new psychologists a year, let alone 64,000? the fact of the matter is that, on the whole, the 40% or so of uni students that are there for the sake of a degree, as opposed to the other 60% who are there to improve thier career, generally take the 'ologies and as a result de-value them.

    We do not need to make sciences or engineering more sexy, if there is demand in the real world, then the eligable students with enough brain cells to notice, will fill those places. What we need to fight is the stupid labour plan for 50% of school leavers to enter uni. All this will do is de-value degrees accross the board and make the 'would you like fries with that?' degrees more previlent.
    Unfortunately it doesn't work like that. The number of science graduates is below the threshold value and businesses are being damaged as a result and we run the risk of losing our high tech sector. This situation is not new, yet students are still keeping away in their droves, so relying on the "brain cells" of students is obviously not working.
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    I think it's really crazy that there are so many "non-traditional" degrees that have become popular in the UK. You would think that the public funding of higher education would dictate what society wants and needs, rather than "surf science."

    I think it's an issue of careers. If you want to be a biologist or a chemist, you'll be in uni until the PhD to get a good position. I'm interesting in investment banking and if you look at their graduate profiles there are lots of students who studied science. They must realize they don't want to do it for their whole lives!

    Also, in the US it's the same, people who study biology or chemistry mostly want to be doctors, people who study physics mostly want to be engineers. Science as an end in itself isn't really happening anymore.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Now surf science is a bunch of crap, I would personally suggest a boycott of plymouth university until they remove that course.
    hehe! I may be wrong but I think more universities than just Plymouth are offering the course.

    As much as I like to take the mick out of Surf Science, I am actually told that it is quite hard. I hear that it is very similar to Ocean Science which includes a lot of physics and maths (wave mechanics etc etc). I know that it has had quite a high drop out rate (probably because all these surfer dudes realising that they can't just surf all day and get a degree).

    Having said all that, it is still crap!
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    I think it's really crazy that there are so many "non-traditional" degrees that have become popular in the UK. You would think that the public funding of higher education would dictate what society wants and needs, rather than "surf science."

    I think it's an issue of careers. If you want to be a biologist or a chemist, you'll be in uni until the PhD to get a good position. I'm interesting in investment banking and if you look at their graduate profiles there are lots of students who studied science. They must realize they don't want to do it for their whole lives!

    Also, in the US it's the same, people who study biology or chemistry mostly want to be doctors, people who study physics mostly want to be engineers. Science as an end in itself isn't really happening anymore.
    I'm gonna stick my head out here and say that IMHO the problem in the UK is that the school leavers have no idea about their ambitions, let alone care where their lives are going. Science is a strong background for near on every profession, be it investment banking, architecture, health care, you name it. All you have to do is look in the back of any broad-sheet newspaper and you will see just how many jobs have a preference for a 'maths or science based degree'.

    The problem is that so few people care to look at the jobs market and plan for where they want to be, instead they take on the rationale of 'oooh, that sounds interesting, wouldnt mind giving that a go', along with 63,999 other people!
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    Interesting debate.

    I'm doing Electronic Engineering, which is in decline. I was quite scared when I saw 2004 admissions for Nottingham.

    12,000 people applied for Humanities, for I believe, something like 1200 places.
    3000 applied for engineering, 800 places.

    Just shows how its in decline Even though it meant I could get in with worser grades than I'd expected, it does concern me
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    There is a genuine concern though. The RSC and Institute of Physics have been lobbying hard for a more focussed approach by government onto recruiting science students. Both learned bodies are also investing in their own recruitment strategies (including the IOP's £1,000 undergraduate bursaries scheme). These actions are not baseless, the CBI have announced that lack of science graduates is damaging business in this country http://www.iop.org/news/981. Many companies are relocating their operations to when a better pool of scientists is present. The Roberts review clearly stated that the lack of science graduates in this country will damage business and the government has resorted, in the short-term, to running immigration incentive schemes for science graduates from outside the EU http://www.workingintheuk.gov.uk/wor..._students.html.

    There is clear evidence that something needs to be done to increase the number of science graduates from our universities, how this will be achieved when many new students enter universities without decent science departments is very unclear to me.
    Don’t forget that the CBI has a clear interest in declaring worker ‘shortages’ given that the education costs are borne by taxpayers. Government initiated action reduces or eliminates the need for costly strategy implemenation on their part. Government recruitment from the EU doesn’t imply that we’d see the downfall of firms in its absence. To the extent that complex research & product development activities of firms aren’t easily moved elsewhere, salaries and recruitment efforts will increase beyond whatever is being done at present.

    I don’t mean to drone on about that point repeatedly, but it’s the logical reaction to a genuine shortage. Large accountancy firms currently face a shortage of chartered employees with experience on large projects. A significant number their graduate intake will leave for industry once qualified, taking several thousand pounds of training with them. Heavy emphasis is thus placed on recruitment. They’re all over my campus, sticking up posters, giving presentations, sending email, picking up many of the science undergraduates the CBI deem so valuable in the process. Back in 6th form, we were alerted of work-experience opportunities they were offering.

    Perhaps others have different experiences, but I saw nothing of these suffering high-tech firms requiring science graduates in 6th form and they’re elusive around university. There’s a good reason why economics/accounting departments are full of investment banker / management consultancy wannabes. That’s not to say wages as high as £35k plus for graduates would be needed to coax more people onto more scientific courses. Still, the importance of money can't be denied. Increases may even be a transitory cost as the pool of potential employees increases.

    An absence of government help will damage these firms in that some proportion of profits will go into mundane promotional activity and higher wages. That’s preferable to further subsidising their existence.

    In summary, the government could certainly help complaining firms, but providing tax-payer funded incentives to study scientific courses isn’t necessary for their survival or long run competitiveness in my view.
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    (Original post by devilgirl999)
    these are modules from my course of which you pick a selection of them i really doubt they are donkey courses or form the basis of 'pretending to study media':

    YEAR ONE
    8 modules from:
    Introduction to the Moving Image - Part 1*
    Introduction to the Moving Image - Part 2*
    Introduction to Film and Television History*
    Practices and Representations (Double Practical Module)
    Television as Popular Culture
    Race in the Cinema
    Introduction to American Television
    Researching TV Audiences
    Introduction to Hollywood Cinema
    Celebrities in Film and Television
    European Cinema

    YEAR TWO
    8 modules from:
    Critical Approaches in Film and Television Studies (Double Module)*
    Practices and Meanings in Film and Television (Practical Double Module)
    American Youth Cinema
    Horror/Nation
    Art and Artists on Screen
    British Cinema in the Age of Television
    British Television Drama
    American TV in the 1950s and 1960s
    Conflicting Images: News Film and Television
    Film and Narrative Theory
    Youth TV
    Sound and Music in Film and Television
    Work Based Learning in the Creative and Cultural Industries
    Spectatorship and Gender
    Introduction to Scriptwriting

    YEAR THREE
    8 modules from:
    Independent Study (Double Module)*
    Alternative Practices in Film and Television (Practical Double Module)
    Creativity, Self and Gender
    Contemporary American Cinema
    Ethics, Creativity and Representation
    Television and Amercian Identities
    Film and TV Melodrama
    Third Cinema
    Schedules and Margins
    Television and Tourism
    Film in the East (Japan, China and Hong Kong)
    Independent and Avant-Garde Cinema
    Management Experience in the Creative and Cultural Industries
    Advanced Scriptwriting
    Is it true one of the coursework assignments in A Level Media Studies involves designing a CD cover?
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    (Original post by ramroff)
    Is it true one of the coursework assignments in A Level Media Studies involves designing a CD cover?
    I did that for Graphics GCSE. :p:
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    it is worrying, but i think people should have the right to chose what course they wana do, not everyone is into academic subjects. I dont think media studies is a rubbish a level (not having done it - i did maths, chemistry and biology) becuase for people wanting to go into jornalism and things like that, it is valuable, however i do think something needs to be done about the lack of people doing science based a levels. And the fact that an A in media studies is the same as an A in biology...when clearly percentages of ppl getting As in bio and media are completly different.

    At the end of the day its the pupils choice, and alsong as we have enough people doing the courses for them to continue for the next generation, then its fine!
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    I'm gobsmaked at the amount of snobbery on this thread and the 'judgement calls' people have seen fit to make of others who they don't even know.
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    We do indeed ned sociologists and physcologists, but how many?
    Are there jobs for them? No, plenty of physcs are unemployed.

    Others DO need to make judgements, or else government wouldn't work etc. If it was all up to ourselves, a fitter on the gas board would be awarding himelf pay of £50k a year! Someone has to say he isn't worth it, and someone has to say that these dgerees are worthwhile either.
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    im not sure about the cd cover making i wasnt given anything like that mine was all pretty much based on theories and different peoples opinions etc and how the audience view a film in comparison to how a film critic or someone studying films may view them like now i cant watch a film without think 'wow look at the lighting on that' or 'f**king hell wicked cinematography' which of course drives my friends and family mad when watching a dvd or video lol
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    One difference I found between studying science in the USA and the UK was how much disscussion of future careers there were. In England I can't remember talking about interesting career opportunities at all (this might just have been at the two schools I attended). In my biology class in the US, my teacher was constantly talking about the future of genetics and bioengineering, and the need for science graduates to fill jobs in these fields (which would also be very profitable). Even though biology is my least favorite science I considered it for a while based just on this. In the UK they really do need to push the interesting things in the future of scientific research and development, as well as the need for qualified scientists/engineers.
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    Whomever it was that suggested an A in a subject like media is not the equivalent to an A in Biology - I can not believe you seriously made that remark. really - you can not be serious?

    So if no one was interested in going in to the media world...what would happen? hmm? Well, you would hvae no newspapaers to read, no websites to look at, no music to hear (as it couldnt be marketed, and as music is technically media - no one to make it either), no TV to watch, no films to see, no adverts to tell you about new products, no packaging on any products, to name but a few......

    The media is an integral part of our society. Something that people would not be able to survive with out. I ca not believe that STUDENTS have such a snooty way of looking at this. Would you prefer it if we all did science and pure maths? boy, woudlnt we all have fun then. Wouldnt our world be so diverse, and interesting, when we all know the same things and can not learn from others knowledge.

    The opinions in this thread are really, mostly disgusting.
 
 
 

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