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    Media per se is important. Media A-level? Controvertible. Are you suggesting that we wouldn't have "newspapers to read", or "websites to look at", or indeed even "music to hear" without A-level Media studies? It's a new A-level and yet newspapers and music have been around a long time!

    The concept of media is clearly important (films etc. could be compared to literature), but - having seen several exam papers - I think that the Media A-level is a joke. Has anyone here done Media and Maths? I'd love to hear your grades in both subjects. My prediction: Media will be higher.
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    My comments were more directed towards Media degrees, rather than A Levels. Having never done any A Levels, I could not comment on the relevance of a media a level compared to any other subject.

    And I wasnt saying that we would not have any papers entertainment etc - just saying that these are skills which are taught to media students. Just like not all people who come up with life saving cures have a degree in biology...if that makes sense?
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    (Original post by indiekitten)
    Whomever it was that suggested an A in a subject like media is not the equivalent to an A in Biology - I can not believe you seriously made that remark. really - you can not be serious?

    So if no one was interested in going in to the media world...what would happen? hmm? Well, you would hvae no newspapaers to read, no websites to look at, no music to hear (as it couldnt be marketed, and as music is technically media - no one to make it either), no TV to watch, no films to see, no adverts to tell you about new products, no packaging on any products, to name but a few......

    The media is an integral part of our society. Something that people would not be able to survive with out. I ca not believe that STUDENTS have such a snooty way of looking at this. Would you prefer it if we all did science and pure maths? boy, woudlnt we all have fun then. Wouldnt our world be so diverse, and interesting, when we all know the same things and can not learn from others knowledge.

    The opinions in this thread are really, mostly disgusting.
    Next you'll be saying people are snotty for thinking an A in General Studies isn't the same as one in maths :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by indiekitten)
    My comments were more directed towards Media degrees, rather than A Levels. Having never done any A Levels, I could not comment on the relevance of a media a level compared to any other subject.

    And I wasnt saying that we would not have any papers entertainment etc - just saying that these are skills which are taught to media students. Just like not all people who come up with life saving cures have a degree in biology...if that makes sense?
    You dont need a Media degree to work in Media.
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    (Original post by indiekitten)
    So if no one was interested in going in to the media world...what would happen? hmm? Well, you would hvae no newspapaers to read, no websites to look at, no music to hear (as it couldnt be marketed, and as music is technically media - no one to make it either), no TV to watch, no films to see, no adverts to tell you about new products, no packaging on any products, to name but a few......
    I haven't got any particular qualms about media studies as a subject if people want to do it, but how you can imply it's an integral requirement for working in the media is slightly concerning. How many people working in national media have media studies A-levels/degrees? Not many, I'd bet.
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    (Original post by Miles)
    I haven't got any particular qualms about media studies as a subject if people want to do it, but how you can imply it's an integral requirement for working in the media is slightly concerning. How many people working in national media have media studies A-levels/degrees? Not many, I'd bet.
    Papers and TV channels have existed for decades and the people that work for them have done fine without needing a Media degree
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    The point i was trying (and obviously failed) to make was that its exactly the same as other degrees. Medicine, engineering etc existed before there were degrees...obviously they have improved, as has the media world. Sure media industry is generally more reliant on experience, rather than qualifications. But you need to know something before try and step on a tv set. Same as doctors need to have some backround knowledge before they go and do some training with in hospitals.

    But, at the end of the day, am i right in syaing the people ****ging of media studies have never studied the subject? So you dont really know whats involved. Just as I dont know whats involved in a medical degree. No doubt i could not pas it for the life of me - because i have no interest in it, and havent done any science since school. As im sure ive said before, the degree is what you make it.
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    Well that's fine. You are more than entitled to your beliefs!
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    (Original post by edders)
    http://www.hesa.ac.uk/holisdocs/pubi...ubject0304.csv

    Looking at this table on the subjects modern students are studying, is anyone else worried that there are a mere 13,360 students (total) in physics, while other (argubaly less strategically important) subjects have much more. For instance, 'cinematics & photography' has 12,035 students, almost as many as physics; psychology has 64,480; American studies 4,430.

    I'm not thinking we should have fewer students in these subjects necessarily, but perhaps more in physics and science, maths, technology generally. Is Britain putting its future economic and scientific power in jeopardy?
    4,430 doing American Studies is nothing... its a tiny proportion of students, i dont think anyone need worry about us American Studies students overflowing the work force.

    and i might add, there's bugger all wrong with American Studies.

    "You dont need a Media degree to work in Media."
    very true, i dont have a media degree, and i now work in the media with an american studies degree.
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    (Original post by nikk)
    As much as I like to take the mick out of Surf Science, I am actually told that it is quite hard.
    I have been told golf course management is quite hard too, its just a counter-myth propagated by students on these courses as some kind of justification for their wastage of tax-payers money. I don't care if it's hard I care if it's useful!

    I hear that it is very similar to Ocean Science which includes a lot of physics and maths (wave mechanics etc etc). I know that it has had quite a high drop out rate (probably because all these surfer dudes realising that they can't just surf all day and get a degree).

    Having said all that, it is still crap!
    I should imagine that there is an element of oceanography to the course as it is important for serious surfers to understand the ocean, however why not just do a degree in oceanography like the generations of surfers before?
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    (Original post by astralcars)
    Don’t forget that the CBI has a clear interest in declaring worker ‘shortages’ given that the education costs are borne by taxpayers. Government initiated action reduces or eliminates the need for costly strategy implemenation on their part. Government recruitment from the EU doesn’t imply that we’d see the downfall of firms in its absence. To the extent that complex research & product development activities of firms aren’t easily moved elsewhere, salaries and recruitment efforts will increase beyond whatever is being done at present.
    It's recruitment from outside the EU by the way. I agree that the government's action is short-term and is a cheap option. R&D is not easily moved elsewhere, but new investment and opportunities are not coming into britain. which is a major problem. Companies are choosing to start elsewhere and there is not much expansion in this sector.

    I don’t mean to drone on about that point repeatedly, but it’s the logical reaction to a genuine shortage. Large accountancy firms currently face a shortage of chartered employees with experience on large projects. A significant number their graduate intake will leave for industry once qualified, taking several thousand pounds of training with them. Heavy emphasis is thus placed on recruitment. They’re all over my campus, sticking up posters, giving presentations, sending email, picking up many of the science undergraduates the CBI deem so valuable in the process. Back in 6th form, we were alerted of work-experience opportunities they were offering.
    High-tech companies require highly qualified individuals, as a PhD student I have been to several recruitment fairs when high-tech companies are desperate to recruit, but one must have the qualifications they are looking for.

    Perhaps others have different experiences, but I saw nothing of these suffering high-tech firms requiring science graduates in 6th form and they’re elusive around university. There’s a good reason why economics/accounting departments are full of investment banker / management consultancy wannabes. That’s not to say wages as high as £35k plus for graduates would be needed to coax more people onto more scientific courses. Still, the importance of money can't be denied. Increases may even be a transitory cost as the pool of potential employees increases.
    One has to remember that these large investment banking / accountancy firms dwarf high-tech industry in terms of size and resources, no wonder they are more of a formidible presence on university campuses. Also, as I have eluded to earliy, high-tech industry does not simply want bright graduates, it wants specific skills often at a masters of PhD level.

    An absence of government help will damage these firms in that some proportion of profits will go into mundane promotional activity and higher wages. That’s preferable to further subsidising their existence.
    To be fair, compared to most of western europe and the USA our investment in science and technology is woefully low, suggestions to stop increasing funding won't help the situation and will mean we will continually lose out to these countries. With our less skilled industries moving to developing economies like india high-tech is becoming more important.

    In summary, the government could certainly help complaining firms, but providing tax-payer funded incentives to study scientific courses isn’t necessary for their survival or long run competitiveness in my view.
    Providing financial incentives is not the way to go I agree, it is a dishonest way of pushing students into science courses. However we need to have a review about how science is taught in schools because this appears to be where the fundamental problems are created.
 
 
 

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