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    Sorry if this question seems a bit stupid, but I don’t actually know a thing about law, and I’m asking this on behalf of a friend. He wants to do law at university but wants to do it in combination with something, (I can’t remember exactly what it was that he said) but very few universities in the UK do it and most that do are Scottish. He says there is not point applying because the Scottish law degree is totally different from the English degree and he wants to be a solicitor in England. Anyway what I wanted to know is is that right, because it seems stupid to me, and if it is, is there any way he can still study the degree in Scotland and do something extra to qualify him to work in England. Thanks.
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    It's not stupid. The law in Scotland and the law in England are completely different in many major principles. As far as I'm aware, he would have to study a 2 year law CPE in England after studying law in Scotland. And that really wouldn't be worth it.
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    So is that right then, a scottish law degree would be useless in england?
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    Well, not 'useless'. I'm sure a 2:1 in, say, Law and Economics from Edinburgh Uni would stand him in good stead, and he could get a decent job in banking, accountancy, business, or such. But he wouldn't be able to be a solicitor.

    Same way that someone with a 2:1 in Law from Oxford wouldn't be able to become a solicitor here, but the degree would not be 'useless'.
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    ok, thanks.
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    Oh, and the average UCAS tariffs for the joint Law LLB's at, again, Edinburgh for example, are very, very high. It's more competitive than Law according to the admissions tutors I spoke to. And Edinburgh also freely admit that they are more leniant towards letting Scottish students join, probably in an effort to rid the 'English public school boy' image of theirs. So, getting accepted would be no walk in the park.
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    (Original post by foxo)
    It's not stupid. The law in Scotland and the law in England are completely different in many major principles. As far as I'm aware, he would have to study a 2 year law CPE in England after studying law in Scotland. And that really wouldn't be worth it.
    I was under the impression that the CPE lasts 1 year full-time.

    If your friend, Steeeevo, did a Law degree at a Scottish university (or any other degree for that matter); there would be a number of options open to him:

    1. Follow the route needed to become an Advocate in Scotland

    2. Do the CPE (Common Professional Examinations or 'Conversion Course') in England/Wales, for one year, which then puts him in the same 'boat' as a graduate of an English/Welsh Law degree (so then your friend would do the LPC to become a solicitor, or the BVC for the Bar - each lasting one-year full-time)

    LPC = Legal Practice Course
    BVC = Bar Vocational Course - both expensive, intensive courses.

    (After the LPC he would then need to complete a 2 year training contract at a Law firm to become a qualified solicitor. Alternatively, after the BVC, he would need to complete a 1 year pupillage at a Chambers to become a qualified practising barrister).

    3. Do a second degree in Law in England/Wales - many universities will allow graduates affiliated status for a second degree - this means that instead of having to do the normal 3 year Law degree, he would do just two years. There are a number of benefits to this: (a) you do 2 years study of English/Welsh Law (plus 3/4 years Scottish) which is an extra year compared to the CPE, and (b) this also mitigates the need to take the CPE - which is an expensive course, and (c) having 3 years+ of Scottish Law and 2 years+ of English/Welsh Law may be attractive to any employers who practice in both areas.


    Overall, if he's certain he wants to be a lawyer in England/Wales, it would seem a lot wiser to just do a degree here - its quicker, cheaper and just makes more sense!
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    (Original post by Lauren18)
    I was under the impression that the CPE lasts 1 year full-time.
    You're the boss. I've read different stuff on the matter, so I'm not sure.
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    Dundee offer the LLB in English Law if thats any help for your friend.
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    (Original post by foxo)
    You're the boss. I've read different stuff on the matter, so I'm not sure.
    I'm not sure either, I would just assume that it's the same as if you do the CPE after a non-Law degree - which is 1 year.
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    Lauren is definitely correct.
    There are two ways to convert for non law grads
    1 yr CPE fulltime or 2 yrs parttime
    or
    2 yr MA, LLM or LLB (each of which is slightly different)
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    Check out Dundee, where you can study English law.
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    Yes, although I think Dundee's choices for doing law as a joint degree are somewhat limited so it might not be ideal.
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    Yeah I've told him about the English Law degrees at Dundee, but he wanted to combine Law with Business and Economics, which arent available with English Law at dundee. Ive mentioned that he can do the CPE for an extra year, but he doesn't like the idea of spending an extra year at a scottish uni and an extra year doing that. I think he is going to settle for doing just pure law or Business law at an English uni now, but thank you all for your comments and advice anyway.
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    If you have qualified as a solicitor in Scotland you don't have to take GDL/CPE to become a solicitor in England. All you have to do is sit part of the Qualified Lawyers Transfer Test, which is administered by BPP, the College of Law and some other private providers on behalf of the Law Society. This is not a course, it is just an exam.

    Be careful however that a combined or joint degree is in fact a qualifying law degree; some are not.

    The QLTT can also be taken by someone who has qualified in some foreign juristictions, although some post-qualification experience may be required.

    If you have an equivalent professional law qualification from another EU member state you can practice in England and Wales as a solicitor or barrister under the Establishment of Lawyers Directive 98/5/EC, provided you register with the Law Society or Bar Council.
 
 
 

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