RIAA, Kazza, Napster, the law & you - views of an artist with a BA Mus & PSCI Watch

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caz
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
I think I've demonstrated some pretty incredible patience with you. I don't have it today. Your big come back is the equivalent of a "I know you are but what am I". Real mature. And believe me, if I was a ****** you'd be crying. Seems to me you may already be. Short for words because I'm close to the truth you try so hard to avoid? Am I disrupting your desperate fight for distraction from your issues? You replied in under 5 seconds, so how much time do you spend in here lurking? You spending all day just waiting for the next word out of my mouth or what? It seems like you have great interest in me, as disturbing as that may be - so I can only assume that you are calling me gay with high hopes. Sorry to disappoint you, but I won't be making you my ***** no matter how much that may interest you. Not only are you not my gender or type, I could never date a girl as ignorant as you. So if you think I'm just being a tough guy, you go ahead and think what ever you want. It doesn't concern me. Let me make it clear - in the grand scheme none of us are relavent - in my immediate world, you are among the completely irrelavent. So unless you just can't help your fixation with me, go spank your ego somewhere else.
that's it, write me 50 more novels! idiot
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Dragon_Amor
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#82
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#82
sorry, fish...
I'm just getting back from a funeral and some things were said there that really disrespected her. An ex of mine died in a car crash. I just haven't had patience for the petty. You're right though.
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caz
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#83
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#83
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
sorry, fish...
I'm just getting back from a funeral and some things were said there that really disrespected her. An ex of mine died in a car crash. I just haven't had patience for the petty. You're right though.
oh shut the hell up stop trying to act all mature, you're an idiot! face it
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Dragon_Amor
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#84
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#84
caz, can you **** off for 5 minutes?
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caz
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#85
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#85
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
caz, can you **** off for 5 minutes?
can you shut the **** up and stop crying for 5 minutes?
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Dragon_Amor
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#86
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#86
Consider yourself reported.

We'll let the administrators decide about you.
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caz
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#87
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#87
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
Consider yourself reported.

We'll let the administrators decide about you.
oh no don't report me!!! my life nears a turning point
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Dragon_Amor
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#88
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#88
Last Words To Waste

What a shock I had today. I knew I've wasted time on flames, but I never had no idea I was wasting time talking to someone who starts so many other threads - the most popular of which being dedicated to talking about Justin Timberlake??? Did I read this right? Oh my God! The only other time I heard someone mention that name was a 12 year old girl - my little cousin Amy.

Now I feel really bad, I really was picking on a little kid. I should be ashamed of myself. I thought I might be in the beginning, but that;s pretty much all the evidence I need. Kid, if you are 12, I'm sorry for pickin' on ya. You really wouldn't know better than to act the way you did.

Hell, if you are not 12... I'm sorry. Anyone who hosts a Justin Timberlake thread is either young or, well, you know - impeded somehow. I feel like I've been dancing in front of someone in a wheelchair - or picking on a kid.... Either way, I now know better and am dropping the moot issue. Those are my last words on the matter.
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caz
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#89
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#89
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
Last Words To Waste

What a shock I had today. I knew I've wasted time on flames, but I never had no idea I was wasting time talking to someone who starts so many other threads - the most popular of which being dedicated to talking about Justin Timberlake??? Did I read this right? Oh my God! The only other time I heard someone mention that name was a 12 year old girl - my little cousin Amy.

Now I feel really bad, I really was picking on a little kid. I should be ashamed of myself. I thought I might be in the beginning, but that;s pretty much all the evidence I need. Kid, if you are 12, I'm sorry for pickin' on ya. You really wouldn't know better than to act the way you did.

Hell, if you are not 12... I'm sorry. Anyone who hosts a Justin Timberlake thread is either young or, well, you know - impeded somehow. I feel like I've been dancing in front of someone in a wheelchair - or picking on a kid.... Either way, I now know better and am dropping the moot issue. Those are my last words on the matter.
uh oh he's busting out the 12 year-old accusations! everyone run! next he's gonna ask me if it's past my bedtime!!!!

god you are such an idiot. listen to yourself
"Hell, if you are not 12... I'm sorry."

What the hell? Who rambles on calling someone 12 years old (and you obviously thought it was funny, or you wouldn't have said it), and then says they're sorry? You are not mature, you're a flamer who whines when he doesn't get his way. Shut the **** up and leave nobody wants you here

Mr. "Omg I got replies in my thread, I must be so loved!!!! People are actually responding to me!!!"
Mr. I get no attention in real life so I equate the value of others based on any form of attention (or so you would like to believe)
Mr. You mentioned Justin Timberlake recently you must be 12 years old (which is quite possibly THE gayest assumption and insult anyone could ever make, and if I really was 12 years old, that would make you look simply pathetic)
Mr. You don't like me so I'm gonna keep crying until you shutup, but at the same time attempt to sound mature in doing so (RIIIIIGHT as if nobody can see right through you)


You're an idiot, GET THE HELL OUTTA HERE
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Dragon_Amor
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#90
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#90
Anyone have anything relevant they want to say on filesharing outside of the mp3 context that has been the focus of most of the real debating here? I think a lot of great stuff's been thrown around about the music/ RIAA element - but no one really got deep into the legal / moral / practical ends of software piracy?
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Dragon_Amor
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#91
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#91
I've seen an entire culture grow around software piracy since I was a kid playing Commodore 64 games. It's certainly not new, but a lot of pirates include .nfo files with instructions and their political views about what it is they do. Essentially the basic feeling I get, if I had to generalize all the .nfo's I've seen, is that you just can't get training that is worth anything on an $80 program, but you can't afford to spend $800 on one that doesn't end up doing what you wanted it too - so they suggest trying all these hacked versions and then buy the ones you get good at and intend to actually use in the long run. Sounds great, right?

Well, a lot of software companies are already doing the serial + product activation online in response to it. Does this really protect them at all? Not really, but it sure annoys a lot of people who buy the product and need to jump through increasing numbers of installaion hoops before they can use what they bought.

Should software piracy in any way differ from mp3 file sharing legally or ethically?
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Sire
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#92
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#92
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
I've seen an entire culture grow around software piracy since I was a kid playing Commodore 64 games. It's certainly not new, but a lot of pirates include .nfo files with instructions and their political views about what it is they do. Essentially the basic feeling I get, if I had to generalize all the .nfo's I've seen, is that you just can't get training that is worth anything on an $80 program, but you can't afford to spend $800 on one that doesn't end up doing what you wanted it too - so they suggest trying all these hacked versions and then buy the ones you get good at and intend to actually use in the long run. Sounds great, right?

Well, a lot of software companies are already doing the serial + product activation online in response to it. Does this really protect them at all? Not really, but it sure annoys a lot of people who buy the product and need to jump through increasing numbers of installaion hoops before they can use what they bought.

Should software piracy in any way differ from mp3 file sharing legally or ethically?
I really don't see the problem. So the music industry dies a little. Great, then we don't get overloaded with more senseless pop/r&b/hip-hop rubbish. Don't get me wrong, there are a few good songs in each of these genres, though sadly you could count them on your fingers. If it can be gained for free, then why not? If you really like an artist, chances are you'll do as I do and download a song or two to find out if you like it or not, rather than play the bloody waiting game of our local radio stations (pop ****) and then go out and buy the CD anyway. Perfectly ok wouldn't you say? Also on the point of having to jump through hoops to activate software that was legitimitely paid for. I can't believe that is allowed, they should at the very least provide a temporary internet connection, or a free-call sort of thing for those without these capabilities. And yes... there are still quite a few people out there who don't use the internet, let alone have it connected in their house at all.
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Dragon_Amor
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#93
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According to a survey undertaken by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, the RIAA's strategy of targeting individual consumers with subpoenas and lawsuits might be making a dent in P2P music-sharing traffic. While there are some concerns about Pew's research methodology (their questions did not distinguish between music download services such as iTunes Music Store and P2P file swapping), their results show that since the first lawsuits were filed in September, the number of users involved in file sharing has dropped from around 35 million to 18 million. Of course, it is entirely possible that some respondents, fearing getting into trouble over file sharing, may have given less-than-honest answers to questions about P2P usage. If the results held outside of the U.S., the RIAA would have reason to rejoice. As it stands, the major labels have made little headway against piracy outside of the U.S.:

"There are so many files being shared internationally, particularly in places the RIAA can't touch, it's irrelevant to go after sharers because there's such a big loophole in their strategy," [Yankee Group analyst Mike] Goodman told TechNewsWorld. "Even if they closed off sharing in every country with copyright laws, there are still tons of countries you can't touch."

While the RIAA spends time and money (soon to be much more money, given the recent ruling on the legality of the RIAA subpoenas) attempting to scare consumers into changing their behavior, piracy runs rampant in other countries which either lack or choose not to enforce copyright laws.

ComScore's data (released concurrently with Pew's) tells a similar story, but provides more granular data, particularly with regard to the usage of online music stores. According to their figures - which tracks usage via a program installed on 1.5 million computers - KaZaa, Grokster, WinMx, and BearShare activity is down significantly while traffic to online music stores such as iTMS and Napster is on the rise.

Perhaps the RIAA's tactics have scared some P2P users straight. On the other hand, the drop in numbers conincides nicely with the appearance of the online music download services. Could it be that the new online music stores provide what music-lovers wanted all along?




Source : Ars Technica | Posted by: Courage on January 5th, 2004 22:12 GMT

http://news.softpedia.com/news/2/200...ary/6654.shtml
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Dragon_Amor
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#94
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#94
This was what I was affraid of:

People getting scared into paying for what was free to begin with.

I have to agree with Sire and with program crackers around the world: most of us still buy the albums we like in the end - most of us still buy the programs we want to stick with in the long run - most of us still put a lot of money into the companies that enable us to fileshare when we buy computers, CD and DVD burners and blanks, and pay for internet connections, and so on.

Filesharing amounts to nothing more than the evolution of radio - and what an evolution. Not just the convienience of on demand music, but movies, pictures, soft-ware, you name it - if it can be a file, it can be shared. Why give it up for one more would-be-middle-man - espcially when that middle-man wants to postion himself in such a way as to make much more than the rest of the middle-men combined and severly cripple the entire landscape of file-sharing in the process?

These are the developments we all pay for when enough succumb to fear. Free the internet - that should be a chant for anyone who enjoys it. It is already "run" by the US government when they regulate who is allowed to be an IP provider, and define how they are to do their business. They regulate the infrastructure, they decide how and if it is allowed to be upgraded witgh new technologies that could vastly improve it's function.

What happened to the research at Nortel? They were working on optical cable networks, that in itself would vastly improve internet trafics data bandwidth and data integrity (less resent packets), until they hit a really interesting development. They managed to split the light that transmits through the optical cable into 192 different frequencies of light that could each function as independant channels with no speed penalty per line compared to a single line of light per cable as is the usual - and they could combine all 192 channels to travel through the single optical cable. Splitting and merging the light to and from it's 192 channels could be done at either side of the cable with all data intact. Take existing systems and figure how much optical would transmit - then multiply by the exponent of 192 if you want to figure out what an impact this technology could have on the internets efficiency via transmission speed. But this won't see light of day (no pun intended) until the US government says so.

The trend is becoming spend more for less. Only you can allow it to happen.
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Dragon_Amor
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#95
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Exclusive Norwegian programmer Jon Lech Johansen, who broke the DVD encryption scheme, has opened iTunes locked music a tad further, by allowing people to play songs they've purchased on iTunes Music Store on their GNU/Linux computers.

"We're about to find out what Apple really thinks about Fair Use," Johansen told The Register via email.

Johansen cracked iTunes DRM scheme in November by releasing code for a small Windows program that dumps the stream to disk in raw AAC format. This raw format required some trivial additions to convert it to an MP4 file that could be played on any capable computer.

But in the best Apple ease-of-use tradition, Johansen has now made this completely seamless, integrating it with the VideoLAN streaming free software project.

How it works
Johansen deduced that the system key that locks the locked music to a single Windows computer is derived from four factors: the serial number of the C: drive, the system BIOS version, the CPU name and the Windows Product ID.

"When you run the VideoLAN Client under Windows it will write the user key to a file. The user key is system independent and can thus be used by the GNU/Linux version of VLC," he explains.

While Apple's iTunes Music Store is restricted to Windows and Apple computers, and Apple only supports its own iPod player as a playback device, VideoLAN is GPL software that runs on a wide variety of computers including Linux, the BSDs, Solaris and even QNX. Although users are at present permitted to burn a CD with music they've purchased, only three Apple or Windows computers are "authorized" at any time. These terms may be tightened at any time, Johansen himself noted recently.

"The RIAA can at any time change the DRM rules," he wrote in November, "and considering their history, it's likely that they will when the majority of consumers have embraced DRM and non-DRM products have been phased out. Some DVDs today include commercials which can't be skipped using 'sanctioned' players. If the RIAA forces Apple to include commercials, what excuses will the Mac zealots come up with? 'It's a good compromise'?"

Reaction
"The restrictions are very frustrating for consumers, and frankly, are unnecessary," Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney Fred Von Lohmann told The Register.

"Every song on iTunes Music Store has been available on the Peer to Peer networks within four hours. All the DRM does is frustrate legitimate consumers; it doesn't stop file sharing," he says. "The real innovation of the last several years was Kazaa and the other file sharing applications. These are leaps and bounds more relevant than iTunes Music Store."

Although the number of downloaders has diminished in the face of lawsuits by the RIAA, tens of millions of Internet users continue to share music on the P2P networks, dwarfing the number of locked-music downloads from DRM stores such as Apple's iTMS.

Apple is widely expected to announce more locked music playback hardware at the MacWorld show in San Francisco this week. But with support growing for flat fee licensing models even amongst record industry executives, today's DRM Goldrush (and the ensuing iTunes vs Windows Media war) could be a very short lived skirmish.

Johansen broke the CSS encryption scheme on DVDs - a case the Norwegian government finally let go - so he could watch a movie that he'd legitimately purchased on his Linux PC. Now millions of Linux users can do the same with iTunes locked music. You can download the code here:





http://developers.videolan.org/cgi-b...sroot=VideoLAN
Source : The Register | Posted by: Courage on January 5th, 2004 22:10 GMT

http://news.softpedia.com/news/2/200...ary/6653.shtml
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Dragon_Amor
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#96
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#96
Turns out the pay more get less concept is deeper than I thought in the music filesgaring universe as proposed changes would have it by the RIAA.

Besides all of the arguments for and against based on technology vs. copyrights vs. privacy rights vs. the distinction between labels and artists hat been pounded around - get this:

What you get on a paid service is a file encoded at a mere 128kps - many encoders describe as radio quality... Couldnt they at least go 320kps for a purchased file? These are files I avoid downloading in the first place because the audio quality simply sucks ass.
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JSM
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#97
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(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
I've published a thesis on Liberalism as a Defense of Native Self-Government. It's enjoyed widespread success.

do you have a copy of it?
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Dragon_Amor
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#98
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All the info detailing the quality of the files available for purchased download can be found on each providers respective websites if you want to check it out. Maximum PC just did a comparison review of iTunes, Rhapody, Roxios iteration of Napster, and MusicMatch's site in their January 2004 issue as well.
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Dragon_Amor
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#99
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#99
Of course I have a copy of it. lol

I wrote it.
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JSM
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#100
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#100
(Original post by Dragon_Amor)
Of course I have a copy of it. lol

I wrote it.
do you have an online copy - that i can see
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