how to reference European Convention On Human rights Watch

The_Goose
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#1
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hello does anyone know how to correctly reference the European Convention on Human Rights?

(Original post by Mr_Deeds)
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
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King Leonidas
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The Human rights recieved royal assent in 1998 but came into power in 2000.
It basically meant because our government ministers had to ensure that every bill introduced is compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights(ECHR)

ECHR was a international treaty after WW2 to protect and give basic human rights to citizens in countries involved in this Ruropean treaty.

The basic rights include

Fair trial
Liberty and security
Privacy
Marriage
Torture
etc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europea...n_Human_Rights

Many articles in there are conventions, so basically all our laws must be neutrual to that!!

Are you doing AS-law unit one AQA/Parliamentary law making tomorrow.
If so you should really know this inside out

Just realised you're a uni student arhh, my advice might be very basic for you!!!
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The_Goose
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(Original post by pinda.college)
The Human rights recieved royal assent in 1998 but came into power in 2000.
It basically meant because our government ministers had to ensure that every bill introduced is compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights(ECHR)

ECHR was a international treaty after WW2 to protect and give basic human rights to citizens in countries involved in this Ruropean treaty.

The basic rights include

Fair trial
Liberty and security
Privacy
Marriage
Torture
etc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europea...n_Human_Rights

Many articles in there are conventions, so basically all our laws must be neutrual to that!!

Are you doing AS-law unit one AQA/Parliamentary law making tomorrow.
If so you should really know this inside out

Just realised you're a uni student arhh, my advice might be very basic for you!!!
I know what it is! I need to know how to reference it - in my bibliography
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Beautiful Nightmare
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You could use it as a limitation to Parliament Sovereignty (sp?)
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Max_L
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I've always found this website pretty useful when it comes to referencing:

http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm
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Mr_Deeds
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Literally Art. x ECHR
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Mr_Deeds
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The OP is asking how you cite the ECHR as a source in the footnotes/ bibliography of an academic essay. Like, for example, when you reference a case as "Jones v Linox Quarries [1952] 2 QB 608".
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The_Goose
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(Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
She's said above, post #3, that it's for her bibliography. You'd give it its full title then, wouldn't you? I agree, if citing it during the essay I'd write art.X ECHR.
(Original post by Mr_Deeds)
..
It's for the bibliography not the footnotes

like I know for UK Acts you have to reference like this: Public Order Act 1994 (c.64) HMSO, London.

so European Convention on Human Rights 1950 didn't seem sufficient
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Mr_Deeds
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(Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
She's said above, post #3, that it's for her bibliography. You'd give it its full title then, wouldn't you? I agree, if citing it during the essay I'd write art.X ECHR.
It would be like this in a bibilography:

ECHR

Art. 10 ECHR
Art. 8 ECHR

It's not like a statute where you just refer to the name, it's year and chapter number. Statutes tend to deal with one specific area of law like "sexual offences" or "aiding and abetting". The ECHR covers a whole host of areas and it's unlikely that you'd cover them all in one essay. Hence you'd usually cite the ECHR as a title and then refer to the specific articles used.
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Mr_Deeds
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(Original post by Celtic_Anthony)
Excellent mate, that's handy to know.
As long as you do actually cite there's not really a right or wrong way - but people a lot wiser than me tend to consider the above as good practice.
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hypocriticaljap
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which referencing system are you using?
If it is Harvard this tool is invaluable
http://www.neilstoolbox.com/bibliogr...ator/index.htm
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The_Goose
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(Original post by hypocriticaljap)
which referencing system are you using?
If it is Harvard this tool is invaluable
http://www.neilstoolbox.com/bibliogr...ator/index.htm
it's none of those options though. nevermind =( I think I'll just have to do it the best way i know how and leave it at that

thanks
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jacketpotato
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Don't know off the top of my head, just copy what some articles on Westlaw have done
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Gelatinous
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Just for future reference (no pun intended)

OSCOLA requires:

Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental
Freedoms (European Convention on Human Rights, as amended) (ECHR)
art 3
...in your first footnote [and ECHR (n3) art 4 for subsequent references, "n" referring to the number of the original, FULL reference] and:
Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental
Freedoms
...in the bibliography.
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Roobic
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#15
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Council of Europe, Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (European Convention on Human Rights, as Amended) (ECHR) Art 3, 1950.

source cross between Oscola _2006 citing international law & refworld - it is a combination of both as I did not like either on it's own

more from oscola :-
Regional treaties
(a) European treaties
Include both the formal and informal/shortened names of the treaty (if the latter exist) in the first reference to a treaty. Give the informal/shortened title in parentheses before the pinpoint reference. The abbreviated titles given in the examples below are intended as a guide only. Authors may choose to create their own abbreviated titles for European treaties.
Cite protocols to treaties by their names, preceded by the name of the treaties to which
they are appended. Dates are generally not given when citing European treaties, as they
may have been amended several times. Include the year if it appears in the standard title of
the treaty or if it improves clarity.
EC Treaty (Treaty of Rome, as amended) art 3b
Treaty on European Union (Maastricht Treaty) art G5
Act of Accession 1985 (Spain and Portugal) Protocol 34
EC Treaty Protocol on the Statute of the Court of Justice
Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (European Convention on Human Rights, as amended) (ECHR) art 3
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WestLawLexis
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Found this at https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/sites/files...ional_law.pdf:

"Cite protocols to treaties by their names, preceded by the name of the treaties to which they are appended. Dates are generally not given when citing European treaties, as they may have been amended several times. Include the year if it appears in the standard title of the treaty or if it improves clarity"

e.g. Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental
Freedoms (European Convention on Human Rights, as amended) (ECHR)
art 3
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ETRD1995
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This thread is cancer.
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