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    honestly?
    no.

    I have nothing but absolute respect for cantabrians. I probably would never be academic enough to have gotten in there.

    I mean, some of my modules (like 3 of my AS modules and 2 of my A2 modules) were Bs.
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    (Original post by Rai)
    honestly?
    no.

    I have nothing but absolute respect for cantabrians. I probably would never be academic enough to have gotten in there.

    I mean, some of my modules (like 3 of my AS modules and 2 of my A2 modules) were Bs.
    Yeah, your academics are totally ****. I mean, you got 2 A* equivalents at A level. And that unconditional offer at Oxford? Dismal. The Midlands Polytechnic...couldn't you do any better than that?

    I'm amused that you rate the Cambridge law degree higher than Oxford's...I prefer the affiliated course to senior status (b/c it gives you options, and you take exams in two stages), but I think beyond that it's much of a muchness and down to feel. Note, also, that Oxford rejected me and Cambridge took me, so maybe it varies a bit? My Camb interviews were much better than my Ox ones, though.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Yeah, your academics are totally ****. I mean, you got 2 A* equivalents at A level. And that unconditional offer at Oxford? Dismal. The Midlands Polytechnic...couldn't you do any better than that?

    I'm amused that you rate the Cambridge law degree higher than Oxford's...I prefer the affiliated course to senior status (b/c it gives you options, and you take exams in two stages), but I think beyond that it's much of a muchness and down to feel. Note, also, that Oxford rejected me and Cambridge took me, so maybe it varies a bit? My Camb interviews were much better than my Ox ones, though.
    No way, I'd rate the oxford law degree much higher than the cambridge one, hence why I applied to oxford. personal preference wise, I love jurisprudence and also as a degree in itself I think a lot of lawyers prefer the degree (if only slightly)

    I also massively prefer the oxford city.

    don't get me wrong, I love Oxford, but everyone i have ever known at Cambridge or applying to it (eg. the people who recently have been rejected) have always had straight 295/300+ UMS and have always worked ridiculously hard. I have no excuse for not getting that high UMS, I just never ever worked during sixth form. The results I got were, for all intents and purposes, due to luck and I GUESS maybe natural ability. My point is my academic profile is a lot less perfect than most Cambridge people and when I was thinking about cambridge the prospect of applying really scared me. At Oxford I was scared when I revealed module grades, but disclosing UMS would have been the end of my application. I got BBA for my A2 maths modules, and thus only barely scraped an A overall by about 20UMS. I much better rate my writing style and my ability to respond in interview than I do my ability to have survived the mundane and unstimulated experience that A-level was at times.

    Oh, and, it's hard to hide the fact that you guys have been first on the league tables for damn near every subject for the last couple of years. I don't place much emphasis on it, but the fact that it has consistently been higher up goes to show that maybe you guys have got something over us.
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    (Original post by Rai)
    No way, I'd rate the oxford law degree much higher than the cambridge one, hence why I applied to oxford. personal preference wise, I love jurisprudence and also as a degree in itself I think a lot of lawyers prefer the degree (if only slightly)

    I also massively prefer the oxford city.

    don't get me wrong, I love Oxford, but everyone i have ever known at Cambridge or applying to it (eg. the people who recently have been rejected) have always had straight 295/300+ UMS and have always worked ridiculously hard. I have no excuse for not getting that high UMS, I just never ever worked during sixth form. The results I got were, for all intents and purposes, due to luck and I GUESS maybe natural ability. My point is my academic profile is a lot less perfect than most Cambridge people and when I was thinking about cambridge the prospect of applying really scared me. At Oxford I was scared when I revealed module grades, but disclosing UMS would have been the end of my application. I got BBA for my A2 maths modules, and thus only barely scraped an A overall by about 20UMS. I much better rate my writing style and my ability to respond in interview than I do my ability to have survived the mundane and unstimulated experience that A-level was at times.

    Oh, and, it's hard to hide the fact that you guys have been first on the league tables for damn near every subject for the last couple of years. I don't place much emphasis on it, but the fact that it has consistently been higher up goes to show that maybe you guys have got something over us.
    Your A levels are exceptional mate, I was just taking the piss. Getting into Oxbridge to study law is terrific--although what you do there is just as important--so I think we're both in a good position. I should and could have higher firsts than I do, just as your As could be better, but they are firsts/As nonetheless.

    I think there's not a lot in the degrees that's that different--maybe I'm wrong here. I wouldn't have said they were viewed particularly differently in firms--that's certainly something I've never seen mentioned in these forums. Again, I could be wrong.

    For affiliated students I think Cambridge is a better bet. I like Oxford a lot, too. I know it quite a bit better than Cambs, as my godfather is there and I used to visit with my Dad. I've only been to Cambs once that I remember, for my interview.

    Anyway, didn't mean to jack the thread. I think that the differences between them are at the margin, and it's more important to pick the course that suits you best (esp for PPE/PPS, Nat Sci, Econ vs E&M, which differ substantially). For grad, I think picking the best supervisor is more important, as both offer excellent resources.

    Congrats, regardless, and best of luck next year.
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    the teaching's way overrated for mml (I do french and german)

    the social life is pretty mediocre.
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    i doubt it
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    Yes it is :ninja:
    No it isn't. :nah:

    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    the teaching's way overrated for mml (I do french and german)
    I would say it varies a lot depending on your supervisors.

    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    the social life is pretty mediocre.
    It's what you make it of it - if anything there's much more variety here than at many other universities. :yep:
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    No it isn't. :nah:


    I would say it varies a lot depending on your supervisors.


    It's what you make it of it - if anything there's much more variety here than at many other universities. :yep:
    it was just my opinion

    I don't think the supervisors are the problem- their no better or worse than any other subject. but I don't think the Use of classes are all that helpful and the supervisions with the 'lectors' are a complete waste of time because they aren't qualified teachers and I never learn anything

    no-one can argue with the fact there are only 3 clubs anyone actually goes to- and they generally play cheese and are not phenomenal (and cindy's is always too full). and its difficult to have parties in college

    so if by variety you mean clubbing/going out then I hardly think it compares to the likes of endiburgh/london/bristol/brighton- but there are very likely other ways in which cambridge social life have more variety (and the collegiate system certainly has its advantages)
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    Accommodation for all 3-4 years sealed it for me.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)

    It's what you make it of it - if anything there's much more variety here than at many other universities. :yep:
    can you tell me what makes you say that?
    I need to get better at taking advantage of what cambridge does have to offer
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    Cambridge is under rated.
    What people don't understand is that God himself studied at Cambridge. God studied at Cambridge people.
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    I think you got rejected from Cambridge.
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    (Original post by anfieldred07)
    why did the reject you? your grades are amazing? (i know its not al grades but still)
    BMAT scores maybe? Sorry, I know you weren't addressing me
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    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    it was just my opinion

    I don't think the supervisors are the problem- their no better or worse than any other subject. but I don't think the Use of classes are all that helpful and the supervisions with the 'lectors' are a complete waste of time because they aren't qualified teachers and I never learn anything
    Obviously I can't comment on MML since I don't do it, but I know that for my subject, the supervisors I have are all very good, while other people I have spoken to in lectures have not been particularly impressed with theirs.

    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    no-one can argue with the fact there are only 3 clubs anyone actually goes to- and they generally play cheese and are not phenomenal (and cindy's is always too full). and its difficult to have parties in college

    so if by variety you mean clubbing/going out then I hardly think it compares to the likes of endiburgh/london/bristol/brighton- but there are very likely other ways in which cambridge social life have more variety (and the collegiate system certainly has its advantages)
    I'll concede that there aren't that many clubs, but "social life" is a lot more than that (and personally I quite like Cindies :o:). Also, you get Formal here which is consistently good fun.

    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    can you tell me what makes you say that?
    I need to get better at taking advantage of what cambridge does have to offer
    As you've mentioned, the college system makes it very easy to participate in things even if you're not very good at it. If there are any sports you'd like to play you can probably make it onto the college team. If you're into theatre there are many different drama societies always looking for people to act or help out backstage. Similarly each college will have a music society, chapel, etc. Then there are the random uni-wide societies like the Tea Society. And of course The Union if you have any interest in politics, debating or current affairs. College unions or CUSU if you want to take part in student politics. There's probably loads more that I haven't thought of (e.g. student newspapers - TCS, Varsity, departmental socs), but that's a start.
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    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    it was just my opinion

    I don't think the supervisors are the problem- their no better or worse than any other subject. but I don't think the Use of classes are all that helpful and the supervisions with the 'lectors' are a complete waste of time because they aren't qualified teachers and I never learn anything

    no-one can argue with the fact there are only 3 clubs anyone actually goes to- and they generally play cheese and are not phenomenal (and cindy's is always too full). and its difficult to have parties in college

    so if by variety you mean clubbing/going out then I hardly think it compares to the likes of endiburgh/london/bristol/brighton- but there are very likely other ways in which cambridge social life have more variety (and the collegiate system certainly has its advantages)
    I agree with you about the social life, I've not really found the sort of social life I was expecting to have here but I'm not sure I agree with you about the academic side (I'm a second year MML-er). Use of classes can be fairly tedious but I think you might be missing the point slightly about the lectors. They're not necesarily meant to be qualified teachers but to give you the opportunity to speak with a native and have them correct your grammar, accent, pronunciation etc, as well as any written work you do for them. I think the more you put into the sessions with the lector, the more you get out of it (and I say this as a very shy person who's not amazing at actually speaking the language) - unless, of course, your lector is just generally bad, and then you should really speak to your DoS.

    But hang in there, second year MML is much better than first year (apart from the Audiovisual paper!).
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    No it isn't. :nah:
    Hehe I know it isn't; I was just having a bitter moment :p:
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    (Original post by yellowwdaisy)
    so if by variety you mean clubbing/going out then I hardly think it compares to the likes of endiburgh/london/bristol/brighton- but there are very likely other ways in which cambridge social life have more variety (and the collegiate system certainly has its advantages)
    I think this perspective is worth noting for prospective students (and I am one), but clubs are not the be-all and end-all of social life at uni. I might be a member of a sizeable minority, but I live in Edinburgh and have not been to a club since June. Before that is was sometime in second year. If you aren't fussed by clubbing, then the lack of clubs is no big thing. Perhaps this is easier for me to know as a second degree applicant. People leaving school who have only just turned eighteen might have less of a sense of what they want. For me, however, my social life revolves around drinking at my flat with friends, or in a pub with friends. Cambridge suits that just fine.
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    (Original post by Crazy_emz)
    I agree with you about the social life, I've not really found the sort of social life I was expecting to have here but I'm not sure I agree with you about the academic side (I'm a second year MML-er). Use of classes can be fairly tedious but I think you might be missing the point slightly about the lectors. They're not necesarily meant to be qualified teachers but to give you the opportunity to speak with a native and have them correct your grammar, accent, pronunciation etc, as well as any written work you do for them. I think the more you put into the sessions with the lector, the more you get out of it (and I say this as a very shy person who's not amazing at actually speaking the language) - unless, of course, your lector is just generally bad, and then you should really speak to your DoS.

    But hang in there, second year MML is much better than first year (apart from the Audiovisual paper!).
    well I just don't ever find talking to native speakers in a classroom setting does anything for my fluency- I've only ever had my pronunciation improved by a class when I had phonetics classes in france, and it just feels so stilted and unnatural- nothing like when I was in germany/france and talked to people-

    I'm perhaps bias because my college makes us do an extra translation class with a french lector- and translation really is something you need a qualified teacher for.
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    (Original post by fumblewomble)
    You'll get out of the MML teaching pretty much exactly what you put in. With the exception of lectures it's a 2 way process. If it's not working, think how YOU can change this.

    Lectors are usually brilliant students (in their field). It sounds like you've written them off which is a shame. If they really can't teach you anything (which I doubt) then think about what you can teach them....the important thing is that you discuss things in the language.

    By the way, hardly any academics have a teaching qualification either...

    The social life will click once you find the right people. Don't assume that your best friends in Cambridge will be the people you meet in your first term.
    well I'm basically comparing the teaching here to teaching I had in language schools- there I learn a huge amount every lesson- here I don't- and I work just as hard here- and I've spoken to a lot of people who have the same frustrations as me.

    certainly in french- because they place so much emphasis on the intellectual side, I struggle so much with that I don't have any time left to actually improve my french. most people in my uofrench class don't understand what they're being asked to do in the 'stylistique' and frequently do the wrong tasks because our teacher isn't clear.

    I do actually think the academics who teach me (translation and supervisions) are mostly excellent teachers- I don't think that part is overrated

    for any perspective applicants here- I think it varies hugely according to which college/use of teachers/ language
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    Academically, no. The amount of energy and resources devoted to teaching and undergraduate education is really second to none. It's a bit like an American liberal arts college only that they have world-class research going on at the same time as well. I can't imagine receiving a more thorough education anywhere else (of course this is my experience, I'm sure plenty of people on here will have ample reasons to moan about the teaching they're getting).

    As a ticket to fame and fortune, inevitably yes.
 
 
 

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