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    (Original post by divinelord)
    Depends on what subject you are talking about. It is second to none in many sciences and some arts and generally a very nice place to be in. Its the ethos that attracted me there.

    However, there are a few where it lacks. Medicine for example where the training area is quite small (you can transfer to london after 3rd year if you want) and the GMC + many hospital administration think that Cambridge graduates are too 'sciency' and haven't necessarily developed the clinical skills required to the extent they want (my really good friends dad reporting who is in the committee and he was disappointed I applied to cambs so this isnt any post rejection rant)

    Its the environment, people and ethos that I think are the best aspects of cambs.
    cammbridge-calary method - look it up

    Look people keep saying this nonsense again and again and again and again but the reality is this:

    Cambridge don't have clinical exposure in the first three years - fine. Cambridge has a clinical course for three years just like ANY other clinical course in the country that is very seperate from the undergraduate course. It is GMC accredited and thus has all the things which other clinical courses have - this is the same argument that people use when they are justifying why all medical schools are "the same" or why the MTAS application should be blind...

    We dont have EARLY clinical exposure, that is the only difference.
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    I have a background from a Swedish university and one and a half decade business experience. I recently had an encounter with a physics graduate from Cambridge. Much because of the rumour the place has, I hoped so much that this would be an exiting and stimulating experience, working with someone really, really clever (I had up till then been quite disappointed in that regard in the UK).

    I was shocked how wrong I was: despite having about 5 years of work experience on top of his Cambridge degree, this person came across as incredibly ignorant, given his supposedly high records of "achievement". Although surprising, I could have lived with that. However, this ignorance also came with an unseen amount of rotten attitude of the type "I have a Cambridge degree, thus my opinion is superior - without me having to back it up". I was so shocked by this completely inflated persona - with very little to back it up, but also amused as apparently a Cambridge degree also (at least in this case) comes with some sort of ridiculous, faked accent - that the person seemed to feel was an argument for being right, all by itself. Almost like, "if I only apply this strange, accent to what I say, people will automatically assume I'm right without me having to prove it".

    One shouldn't draw conclusions on too few cases, but so far I have to say, there is strong indication that Cambridge and Oxford are insanely overrated - at least when it comes to the quality of people produced. Perhaps in the UK, they are better than the "normal universities" (although I doubt it), but I have a strong feeling that Swedish universities produce more able and smarter people. Oxbridge, I think, produces people that are mended to become "leaders" in a very old fashioned sense: it is not so much being right, or thinking right - it is about instilling an attitude that they are right - period! The type of leaders that don't lead by being inspiring, or successfully showing to people why they are right and as a result make them follow. It's about producing "steadfast" leaders that won't back down to anything (no matter how right it is shown to be) and to "force foot soldiers over the edge of the trenches (without necessary leading the way themselves)". This type of leaders are perhaps still sought after in "ruthless", conservative industries such as banking, law etc. But it is completely unsuitable for innovative tech companies where "thinking right" is far more important than "being convinced that you are right".

    It might have been an extreme case, but I would almost declare the person I'm referring to as "unemployable" - much because of the distorting tensions having him around would create. And - again - not very much (useful) brain-work either...

    Disappointing, but still a learning made...

    So, all of you youngsters that didn't make it in to Oxbrige - congratulations - there are better options. These places are still impressive and interesting places to visit, but very much relics of the past and not learning institutions of the future...
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    (Original post by pinto)
    I have a background from a Swedish university and one and a half decade business experience. I recently had an encounter with a physics graduate from Cambridge. Much because of the rumour the place has, I hoped so much that this would be an exiting and stimulating experience, working with someone really, really clever (I had up till then been quite disappointed in that regard in the UK).

    I was shocked how wrong I was: despite having about 5 years of work experience on top of his Cambridge degree, this person came across as incredibly ignorant, given his supposedly high records of "achievement". Although surprising, I could have lived with that. However, this ignorance also came with an unseen amount of rotten attitude of the type "I have a Cambridge degree, thus my opinion is superior - without me having to back it up". I was so shocked by this completely inflated persona - with very little to back it up, but also amused as apparently a Cambridge degree also (at least in this case) comes with some sort of ridiculous, faked accent - that the person seemed to feel was an argument for being right, all by itself. Almost like, "if I only apply this strange, accent to what I say, people will automatically assume I'm right without me having to prove it".

    One shouldn't draw conclusions on too few cases, but so far I have to say, there is strong indication that Cambridge and Oxford are insanely overrated - at least when it comes to the quality of people produced. Perhaps in the UK, they are better than the "normal universities" (although I doubt it), but I have a strong feeling that Swedish universities produce more able and smarter people. Oxbridge, I think, produces people that are mended to become "leaders" in a very old fashioned sense: it is not so much being right, or thinking right - it is about instilling an attitude that they are right - period! The type of leaders that don't lead by being inspiring, or successfully showing to people why they are right and as a result make them follow. It's about producing "steadfast" leaders that won't back down to anything (no matter how right it is shown to be) and to "force foot soldiers over the edge of the trenches (without necessary leading the way themselves)". This type of leaders are perhaps still sought after in "ruthless", conservative industries such as banking, law etc. But it is completely unsuitable for innovative tech companies where "thinking right" is far more important than "being convinced that you are right".

    It might have been an extreme case, but I would almost declare the person I'm referring to as "unemployable" - much because of the distorting tensions having him around would create. And - again - not very much (useful) brain-work either...

    Disappointing, but still a learning made...

    So, all of you youngsters that didn't make it in to Oxbrige - congratulations - there are better options. These places are still impressive and interesting places to visit, but very much relics of the past and not learning institutions of the future...
    You said it yourself. (in bold)
    It's even possible that person is trying out his luck in Sweden because he was unemployable in UK.....

    I've know well over 30 ex-cambridge students (and a few more if you include ex-Oxford) and have worked many of them. Never come across such a poor example you're so unlucky to have to deal with. In fact, most of ex-Oxbridge I've come across are quite modest people with their feet firmly on the ground, maybe because they'd always been surrounded by other people who are at least as smart as them, often much smarter, around them. So they never take their 'intelligence' for granted as they know very well they are NOT the top.

    But every institute has and does create a **** like your colleague.
    Important thing is, do not stereo-type on a basis of knowing just one example.

    Edit:
    Hope you (or your company) didn't employ him only because he graduated from Cambridge. I mean, he has had work experience for 5 years. What were the references like from the firms that gave him a work experience?
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    (Original post by pinto)
    I have a background from a Swedish university and one and a half decade business experience. I recently had an encounter with a physics graduate from Cambridge. Much because of the rumour the place has, I hoped so much that this would be an exiting and stimulating experience, working with someone really, really clever (I had up till then been quite disappointed in that regard in the UK).

    I was shocked how wrong I was: despite having about 5 years of work experience on top of his Cambridge degree, this person came across as incredibly ignorant, given his supposedly high records of "achievement". Although surprising, I could have lived with that. However, this ignorance also came with an unseen amount of rotten attitude of the type "I have a Cambridge degree, thus my opinion is superior - without me having to back it up". I was so shocked by this completely inflated persona - with very little to back it up, but also amused as apparently a Cambridge degree also (at least in this case) comes with some sort of ridiculous, faked accent - that the person seemed to feel was an argument for being right, all by itself. Almost like, "if I only apply this strange, accent to what I say, people will automatically assume I'm right without me having to prove it".

    One shouldn't draw conclusions on too few cases, but so far I have to say, there is strong indication that Cambridge and Oxford are insanely overrated - at least when it comes to the quality of people produced. Perhaps in the UK, they are better than the "normal universities" (although I doubt it), but I have a strong feeling that Swedish universities produce more able and smarter people. Oxbridge, I think, produces people that are mended to become "leaders" in a very old fashioned sense: it is not so much being right, or thinking right - it is about instilling an attitude that they are right - period! The type of leaders that don't lead by being inspiring, or successfully showing to people why they are right and as a result make them follow. It's about producing "steadfast" leaders that won't back down to anything (no matter how right it is shown to be) and to "force foot soldiers over the edge of the trenches (without necessary leading the way themselves)". This type of leaders are perhaps still sought after in "ruthless", conservative industries such as banking, law etc. But it is completely unsuitable for innovative tech companies where "thinking right" is far more important than "being convinced that you are right".

    It might have been an extreme case, but I would almost declare the person I'm referring to as "unemployable" - much because of the distorting tensions having him around would create. And - again - not very much (useful) brain-work either...

    Disappointing, but still a learning made...

    So, all of you youngsters that didn't make it in to Oxbrige - congratulations - there are better options. These places are still impressive and interesting places to visit, but very much relics of the past and not learning institutions of the future...
    2010 thread...
 
 
 

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