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People with no Plan B are more likely to be.... watch

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    Plan A prove the Riemann Hypothesis.

    I have no other plans.
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    Pregnant.
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    My plan B is to be a doctor. I think I'm working to complete that.

    Plan A is an unrealistic dream which unfortunately is unlikely to happen. It's kind of sad really.
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    (Original post by d123)
    Just a question to those of you who actually have a Plan A in the first place - how did you manage to come up with it? How do you know that's what you want to do?
    My parents bought me an Amiga when I was really young and I liked the idea of making games for it. Everything just followed from that.
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    I am one of those people who never make a plan B because I feel if I did that, I would feel as if somewhere inside I have already given up aiming for plan A. Obviously most people who make plan B's don't feel like this, but I certainly do. I feel like I need to concentrate on plan A and not get side tracked in thinking about plan B. And also, as of yet, I have not had to have a plan B (and I hope my life continues this way, I am determined enough though, if it doesn't work out first time, I certainly won't give up on plan A, I will just try again at what I failed at)
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    Successful

    OR

    Unsuccessful?

    Most people have a plan concerning their career goals (at least a 'dream' career if not a plan) but some gradually begin to think that they can't achieve it, so they switch to Plan B - which then becomes the new plan A. Then, once again they gradually begin to think they can't reach their new plan A and so they switch to a new Plan B and so on until they end up looking back on their lives wondering why they didn't just go for their original goal and try to succeed in what they had a passion for.

    It makes me think that people with Plan B's are pessimistic and have little self belief. I've always had a plan B myself (oh the irony) - incase things go wrong, but as I'm getting older I'm considering dropping any Plan B's and just aiming for something which may well fail or which may be a huge achievement. I always think I have all the time in the world to achieve my dreams but the reality is that in a couple of years I'll be leaving university and either be working towards the job I've always wanted or looking back and wondering why I hadn't tried harder.

    So my question/s to you is/are:

    Do you think it's wise to have a Plan B concerning your career? Do you believe that those without a Plan B, those with tunnel vision and determination for one goal, are more likely to succeed than those with a primary goal and a fallback option? Or do you believe that those who don't prepare for possible failure are naive and likely to end up settling for a lot less than they desired?
    Personally, I don't usually have a plan B.

    But you have to always asses where you are in life, you have to be optimistic and confident (or your life will be sad) but you have to always remain realistic.

    When things could go pear shaped, you should give it your best shot, but have a Plan B in mind.

    Otherwise, just stick to whatever you are doing/working on and try your best.

    Currently, my Plan A is going smooth overall and I'm doing OK. I kinda always have something in the back of my mind incase, but its not officially a Plan B yet.
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    My life has been one topsy-turvy trip through hell...having said that, I no longer do plan Bs, it's all about my A-game...
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    (Original post by dfjr)
    My plan B is to be a doctor. I think I'm working to complete that.

    Plan A is an unrealistic dream which unfortunately is unlikely to happen. It's kind of sad really.
    I want to know your plan A!! To be an astronaut?? I wanted to do that when I was in primary school when all the other girls around me wanted to be a vet or a teacher lol!:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by d123)
    Just a question to those of you who actually have a Plan A in the first place - how did you manage to come up with it? How do you know that's what you want to do?
    I aimed for my most ridiculous dreams to begin with and then when I was satisfied that I'd given them my best shot and they were never going to be a reality I worked on my practical ambitions.

    My advice is: do what you instictively want to do and if it fails then at least you know you tried and you won't regret it in years to come.

    I'm now working towards something achievable and something which I have a desire to do. Just figure out what interests you and what you're good at - you need to have both of those elements to succeed (in most cases).
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    I think it's always good to have a plan B, and I don't think it's pessimistic if you've given plan A a real shot. The situation you described, with people just giving up because of their own negativity, that's the problem.

    I have a plan A, and have done since I was young, but I do have plan B as a safety net. Not because I don't think plan A is possible, but purely because it is there as a safety net if I attempt and fail at plan A.
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    I don't have, nor do I want, a plan B.

    I have plan A, and my strategy to reach the goals within plan A is to continuously play at the top of my game, and make sure that the top of my game is higher than the top of anybody else's game. So far, there has been no need for safety nets.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    I aimed for my most ridiculous dreams to begin with and then when I was satisfied that I'd given them my best shot and they were never going to be a reality I worked on my practical ambitions.

    My advice is: do what you instictively want to do and if it fails then at least you know you tried and you won't regret it in years to come.

    I'm now working towards something achievable and something which I have a desire to do. Just figure out what interests you and what you're good at - you need to have both of those elements to succeed (in most cases).
    I guess that's the main problem really; I don't know what I instinctively want to do. I just know I'd like to do something worthwhile, but that doesn't narrow it down much! I'm sure I'll figure it out - I've got a few years to go yet before I decide, at least, that's what I tell myself!
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    I want to know your plan A!! To be an astronaut?? I wanted to do that when I was in primary school when all the other girls around me wanted to be a vet or a teacher lol!:rolleyes:
    To be a successful musician I suppose (though not a classical musician). Not the male version of Britney spears or be in some boyband, but actually to be sort of recognised e.g. something like the Beatles or Bob Dylan etc.

    I'm not in a band however, not particularly good at singing, pretty average at guitar and can't string tunes. I can write lyrics (I write quite a lot, e.g. I've had several attempts at a novel and I'm in the middle of writing one now, and I write short stories, sometimes poems) though, but I can't really think of music to go with it. I do obsess over good music though, and enjoy listening to lots of varieties of music.

    It's sort of silly. Though still I'm plodding on with my medical degree and will hopefully become a doctor. I can still appreciate music though and can still play it, so it won't be so bad.


    I know having plan B as a doctor may seem a bit bad, but it really is the second most favourite career I see myself doing. Still I do feel a bit bad when people get 4 rejections and go on about how all they ever wanted was to be a doctor. I was hardly ecstatic when I got my offer (In fact I got multiple), I was kind of confident I would get into med school and I got in.
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    (Original post by d123)
    I guess that's the main problem really; I don't know what I instinctively want to do. I just know I'd like to do something worthwhile, but that doesn't narrow it down much! I'm sure I'll figure it out - I've got a few years to go yet before I decide, at least, that's what I tell myself!
    You're right . Most people don't know what they want to do - even when studying their degree. Just as long as you work hard throughout your education and keep doors open for yourself, it won't particularly matter that you have no clear ideas right now.
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    I don't even have a Plan A!
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    my plan A had always been to be lawyer since year 9, but then after some set backs of my own during my 1st year at college my plan A started to disappear though i didnt want it to
    but i always said my plan B would be in the business area which i plan to do at uni, but i have now thought about making my plan B a plan C , therefore my new plan A being having a business degree with really good results and then do masters in law however if that dont work ill would just forget the dream about being a lawyer and work my hardest on being good in the business area .


    hopefulky what i just wrote makes sense
    in short
    PLAN A - was to be a lawyer x
    PLAN B - do a business degree and then postgraduate in law
    or if not
    PLAN C - stick with the business
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    (Original post by dfjr)
    To be a successful musician I suppose (though not a classical musician). Not the male version of Britney spears or be in some boyband, but actually to be sort of recognised e.g. something like the Beatles or Bob Dylan etc.

    I'm not in a band however, not particularly good at singing, pretty average at guitar and can't string tunes. I can write lyrics (I write quite a lot, e.g. I've had several attempts at a novel and I'm in the middle of writing one now, and I write short stories, sometimes poems) though, but I can't really think of music to go with it. I do obsess over good music though, and enjoy listening to lots of varieties of music.

    It's sort of silly. Though still I'm plodding on with my medical degree and will hopefully become a doctor. I can still appreciate music though and can still play it, so it won't be so bad.


    I know having plan B as a doctor may seem a bit bad, but it really is the second most favourite career I see myself doing.
    Well you could be a doctor and then just keep music as a hobby. You will certainly be able to entertain your patients at any parties that may happen during your career

    You could record a CD and get them to play it in the waiting rooms and have reception selling them :p:
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    Whilst I'll readily admit I have studied good business practise very little, I suspect that the most successful people are those with no plans at all. They are more likely to take the opportunities.
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    I have multiple goals that I would be happy with:

    Plan A - Scientist [as in getting out of academia and going out into the real world with a PhD]
    Plan B - Academic [as in my plan fails and I can't get a non-uni job with my PhD, I'd settle for a research-heavy post with lecturing]
    Plan C - Civil Service/Environment Agency [if I have a change of heart before I set on the road to a PhD, I'd like to go into the Civil Service and do something useful with my life]

    I won't be crushed if I don't get to go off and, say, join the British Antarctic Survey as a research scientist, because I'll be the man with a plan, but I still want to give 100% into getting to that PhD. Mostly because I love the idea of doing something useful with a subject I love, partially because I get to call myself "Dr."
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    Oooh you have very similar interests to me. Except my plan A is your plan E and I already tried your plan C and didn't dig it. I'm extremely tempted by your plan A though. How are you preparing for it? I've absolutely no idea how to even get on the ladder in writing. I guess writing is a sort of fantasy job I have but journalism is a practical and achievable one because I know the route I need to take.

    I'm also thinking about dropping Plan Law. SO much work and I just can't be arsed.

    Preparing for Plan A? I write. And I read. Not much really. I've got about 40 novel beginnings right now but no complete novel.

    Journalism could get you on the publishing ladder.
 
 
 
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