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    (Original post by east)
    can someone please eplain to me what a Consultanc job wihing business is about and what degree is needed out of curiosity thanks
    you mean inhouse consulting? http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...use+consulting
    (altho it does seem to be a german thing)
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    So basically the next best thing would be accounting? What about these other management schemes, would nobody go on these?
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    (Original post by dpb23)
    It seems that ACA / ACCA (not as respected) are often treated as universal 'get-out clauses' for people short on options or just unsure when they leave uni. I dont mean this with any distain - the ACA is a pretty sure-fire way to get onto a good pay scale after the three years it should take to qualify (don't know figures but they aren't bad maybe 24-28k pre-qual, 35-45 soon after? correct me if im wrong! nothing compared to banking of course). Say, in audit, you get a lot of travel (going by various friends' experiences), exposure to lots of different businesses but will be expected to fill the role of '*****' for a while (lots of the work is dull to start with and you will be studying as if back at uni). It sounds like this might be a good option - but these roles, too, are competitive, and you'll need to get in early and demonstrate motivation.

    How one demonstrates motivation for auditing is beyond me. Eyes on the prize (ACA).
    I dont think anyone in the Big Four felt a burning desire to go into audit when they were, say, in Yr11 (compared to the number of people here that seem to have an IB fetish from a young age).

    But Big Four ACA is definitely a long-term game. Short term sacrifice, lower salary than a trader for e.g., but more job security, strong qualification at the end of the tunnel, plus it buys you more time to figure out what you want to do in your career exactly.
    IB grad pay, esp for FO, is obscene compared to the national average, but job security isnt exactly great and you can easily lose your job when the **** hits the fan and then spend your days browsing tsr IB&consulting threads.....

    Also, the good thing about the Big Four is you can get some experience within other divisions like transaction services, corporate finance etc to beef yourself up as very well-experienced person and then move into IB, consulting etc etc later......
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    What would the average salary be for a graduate accountant in somewhere other than the top 4 firms? An average/rough estimate?
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    The next best thing?

    The Operative: You know, in certain older civilized cultures, when men failed as entirely as you have, they would throw themselves on their swords.
    Dr. Mathias: Well, unfortunately, I forgot to bring a sword.
    Dr. Mathias: [as the Operative pulls out his sword] I would put that down right now if I were you.
    The Operative: Would you be killed in your sleep, like an ailing pet?
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    The next best thing?

    The Operative: You know, in certain older civilized cultures, when men failed as entirely as you have, they would throw themselves on their swords.
    Dr. Mathias: Well, unfortunately, I forgot to bring a sword.
    Dr. Mathias: [as the Operative pulls out his sword] I would put that down right now if I were you.
    The Operative: Would you be killed in your sleep, like an ailing pet?
    firefly reference?
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    (Original post by IARELOVEAMY)
    What would the average salary be for a graduate accountant in somewhere other than the top 4 firms? An average/rough estimate?

    Big Four and possibly Grant Thornton and BDO in London will start at £28k a year, roughly. The same firms outside London offer around £20k. Can't confirm it, but I have heard firms outside of the Top 10 can offer as little as £15k a year.

    I would say that people at the Big Four/GT are there for the firm's brand value and plan to use that to move on to bigger and better things post-ACA, whereas the people you see in the small family accountants businesses are there because they truly have this err, 'passion' for auditing and processing tax computations...
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    I think you should seriously consider looking at something you enjoy doing.

    When you're in a race to the top and you're in with a chance of winning, things are great - you can start on a great job with a great salary. Once you start looking for "the next best" or even "the next best after that", the money stops being such an incentive, and the work can get less interesting. You've got to think about whether you could actually bear accountancy for a few years. The money won't necessarily be enormously better than grad schemes in a number of other sectors (energy, pharm, defence, advertising, whatever) - and one of these might interest you more.
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    The next best thing?

    The Operative: You know, in certain older civilized cultures, when men failed as entirely as you have, they would throw themselves on their swords.
    Dr. Mathias: Well, unfortunately, I forgot to bring a sword.
    Dr. Mathias: [as the Operative pulls out his sword] I would put that down right now if I were you.
    The Operative: Would you be killed in your sleep, like an ailing pet?
    If you check my first post, it does say that I don't fancy the traveling in consulting and don't find IB very interesting. So why does that mean I fail? I will enter a different graduate scheme, get a decent wage and still have time with my girlfriend and friends, rather than being some "big 4" company's *****.

    (Original post by Bramlow)
    I think you should seriously consider looking at something you enjoy doing.

    When you're in a race to the top and you're in with a chance of winning, things are great - you can start on a great job with a great salary. Once you start looking for "the next best" or even "the next best after that", the money stops being such an incentive, and the work can get less interesting. You've got to think about whether you could actually bear accountancy for a few years. The money won't necessarily be enormously better than grad schemes in a number of other sectors (energy, pharm, defence, advertising, whatever) - and one of these might interest you more.
    Thank you for your reply, I agree! I really don't think I will find accountancy interesting at all and like you said.. I would rather join an industry as a grad on £28k and move my way up!
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    (Original post by IARELOVEAMY)
    If you check my first post, it does say that I don't fancy the traveling in consulting and don't find IB very interesting. So why does that mean I fail? I will enter a different graduate scheme, get a decent wage and still have time with my girlfriend and friends, rather than being some "big 4" company's *****.
    So why does the thread title say "the next best thing?" if, as you say, you don't fancy the traveling in consulting and don't find IB very interesting? But I digress.

    Reading the above post, it seems really clear to me what you want to do and seeing as your mind is already made up, look at FTSE100/Fortune 500 grad schemes and apply to those.
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    (Original post by uthinkilltellu)
    So why does the thread title say "the next best thing?" if, as you say, you don't fancy the traveling in consulting and don't find IB very interesting? But I digress.

    Reading the above post, it seems really clear to me what you want to do and seeing as your mind is already made up, look at FTSE100/Fortune 500 grad schemes and apply to those.
    Because I still want to go in to something that will help progress my career to a certain extent rather than only being able to progress in the company I'm with.

    And thank you I will look into who offers these schemes and how reputable they are. Thanks for the help everyone
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    Thank you for your reply, I agree! I really don't think I will find accountancy interesting at all and like you said.. I would rather join an industry as a grad on £28k and move my way up!
    I think that makes sense, and I would actually go further and say that you might have misunderstandings about the differences between the various options.

    If you want huge, huge money when you're still quite young, then investment banking - short of starting a successful business of your own - is the only way to go.

    For everything else, the differences aren't that huge. Consultants get paid more than accountants to begin with, sure, but not by a game-changing amount.

    What you will find is that - excluding IB - all decent grad schemes have good pay, and good prospects. It doesn't matter if you start at Accenture, or Rolls-Royce, or Shell, or BAE Systems, if you're on a good graduate scheme the money will be good and the advancement opportunities will be promising. That's the whole point of the graduate schemes: they're essentially fast-track routes to get good people to top positions quickly.

    Whether you make merely good money (middle-ranking manager) or amazing money (Partner, C-level) all depends on how good you are in the job you're in. As a student you probably think that what scheme you get on is the be-all-and-end-all, but things actually tend to balance out down the line.

    So have a think about what you're good at, and what you like. If you go for something that you're not interested in for the money alone, ironically you may end up making less money in 5-10 years time. Lack of enthusiasm shows, and it leads to a lack of career advancement. Don't be a sucker and go somewhere you're not interested for the money alone. (Unless it's IB, of course, in which case it really is a different ball game altogether.)
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    I think that makes sense, and I would actually go further and say that you might have misunderstandings about the differences between the various options.

    If you want huge, huge money when you're still quite young, then investment banking - short of starting a successful business of your own - is the only way to go.

    For everything else, the differences aren't that huge. Consultants get paid more than accountants to begin with, sure, but not by a game-changing amount.

    What you will find is that - excluding IB - all decent grad schemes have good pay, and good prospects. It doesn't matter if you start at Accenture, or Rolls-Royce, or Shell, or BAE Systems, if you're on a good graduate scheme the money will be good and the advancement opportunities will be promising. That's the whole point of the graduate schemes: they're essentially fast-track routes to get good people to top positions quickly.

    Whether you make merely good money (middle-ranking manager) or amazing money (Partner, C-level) all depends on how good you are in the job you're in. As a student you probably think that what scheme you get on is the be-all-and-end-all, but things actually tend to balance out down the line.

    So have a think about what you're good at, and what you like. If you go for something that you're not interested in for the money alone, ironically you may end up making less money in 5-10 years time. Lack of enthusiasm shows, and it leads to a lack of career advancement. Don't be a sucker and go somewhere you're not interested for the money alone. (Unless it's IB, of course, in which case it really is a different ball game altogether.)
    Thanks, I agree totally! +rep too because of the helpfulness
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    (Original post by IARELOVEAMY)
    What would the average salary be for a graduate accountant in somewhere other than the top 4 firms? An average/rough estimate?
    Big4 for Assurance/Audit its around 27k+ for 2010. For consulting/advisory in Big4 it is normally only 2-3k higher (not much).

    Remember going for any role that requires ACA/CA/CFA etc requires commitment. You must understand that this is a big commitment, sacrificing your social life to study hard when you need to do so. If you do not have that commitment you may easily fail the exams and failing twice = you are out of the company.

    So job security depends lot on your exam performances. Generally CIMA is viewed as slightly easier option.
 
 
 
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