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    How high rating is Edinburgh's Law school?
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    The times, guardian etc all publish league tables if you are interested in them. Another thing you might want to consider is whether you want to do a degree which will restrict you to practising in Scotland. If you do, then all you have to consider is Edinburgh against other Scottish universities.
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    (Original post by doivid)
    The times, guardian etc all publish league tables if you are interested in them. Another thing you might want to consider is whether you want to do a degree which will restrict you to practising in Scotland. If you do, then all you have to consider is Edinburgh against other Scottish universities.
    It works the same way as if you studied law in England, theres no difference to it just because its the other way around.... you can do a conversion course which is only a year long, I believe, so it isn't really a major issue.
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    (Original post by doivid)
    The times, guardian etc all publish league tables if you are interested in them. Another thing you might want to consider is whether you want to do a degree which will restrict you to practising in Scotland. If you do, then all you have to consider is Edinburgh against other Scottish universities.
    That's one of the things that irk's me about Edinburgh. I might get an offer from Durham, but I much prefer Edinburgh as a city and you don't have to pay tuition fees. I hate the idea of this one year conversion course And even with that, would the Edinburgh Law degree not be well rated? (Since its Scots Law)
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    It works the same way as if you studied law in England, theres no difference to it just because its the other way around.... you can do a conversion course which is only a year long, I believe, so it isn't really a major issue.
    Is there not a shorter version of the conversion course? I just don't like the idea of 'another' year...I'll be ancient, since all the English ones graduate in 3 years.
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    (Original post by Yoshua)
    Is there not a shorter version of the conversion course? I just don't like the idea of 'another' year...I'll be ancient, since all the English ones graduate in 3 years.
    I'm not sure, I don't study law so this is just from what I've learnt/heard from friends and tsr. You can do English law at Dundee, I know that much You won't be ancient - as someone facing the prospect of graduation this year I'd give anything to be a student for another year!

    I'll quote SS - she is studying law at Glasgow (don't think we have any Edinburgh law people) but she might know the answer to this type of thing as obviously it isn't dependent upon the university.

    (Original post by sparklysparkles)
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    Do you know anything about this?
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    I'm not sure, I don't study law so this is just from what I've learnt/heard from friends and tsr. You can do English law at Dundee, I know that much You won't be ancient - as someone facing the prospect of graduation this year I'd give anything to be a student for another year!

    I'll quote SS - she is studying law at Glasgow (don't think we have any Edinburgh law people) but she might know the answer to this type of thing as obviously it isn't dependent upon the university.



    Do you know anything about this?
    Thank you very much!
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    (Original post by Yoshua)
    Thank you very much!
    Thats okay - PS help connections are useful

    With regards to whether Edinburgh is highly regarded or not - from what I'm aware Aberdeen and Edinburgh seem to be the top universities for law in Scotland, with the some of the others not too far behind at all (Again, this is just going on what I know from friends who study in various places so I'm open to someone else jumping in on this) so I have no reason to believe a degree wouldn't be highly regarded in England. If someone came to Scotland with a degree from one of the best English universities would you be questioning how well rated it would be here? As long as you'd done the conversion course (for either side of the border) I can't imagine it makes loads of difference but I could be wrong
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    (Original post by Yoshua)
    That's one of the things that irk's me about Edinburgh. I might get an offer from Durham, but I much prefer Edinburgh as a city and you don't have to pay tuition fees. I hate the idea of this one year conversion course And even with that, would the Edinburgh Law degree not be well rated? (Since its Scots Law)
    I have really no idea why people have to do a conversion course between England and Scotland. After all, the legal systems must be very similar. I've heard that Glasgow offer a course which allows you to practise in either England or Scotland, so if I was a Scottish student looking to avoid tuition fees I'd probably opt for that one.
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    (Original post by Yoshua)
    Is there not a shorter version of the conversion course? I just don't like the idea of 'another' year...I'll be ancient, since all the English ones graduate in 3 years.
    No, there isn't. A year is a short amount of time, and you don't even have to do all the parts of the conversion course if you already have a Scots law degree.

    You will not be ancient: you'll be finished with the academic stage of legal training by 23. You'd be 26 by the time you were fully qualified as a solicitor in Scotland, compared to 24 in England. Go where you'll be happiest. Only a 17 or 18 yo thinks being 23 is ancient. I can seeing concern about funding, but don't worry about the age issue.

    Incidentally, if you might want to practise in Scotland you *must* do a law degree in Scotland. If you have a degree in another subject, or in English law, you can do a 2 year accelerated degree. The only way to become a lawyer in Scotland without doing a degree in Scots law is to transfer after qualifying in England (i.e., after a two year training contract as a solicitor or as a fully paid-up barrister) and taking several tests in Scots law. Moreover, it's easier to transfer from Scots to English as a qualified lawyer than vice versa. (There are fewer tests, and you don't have the additional hurdle of coming to grips with civil law, which isn't usually required in England.)

    I suggest you look at the Dundee dual qualifying programme--Dundee is an excellent law school, and you could do a degree in English and Scots law in four years. Best of both worlds.

    Edinburgh is an excellent law school, North or South of the border. It's currently ranked 11th in the Times. You could do far worse, wherever you want to/end up practising.
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    (Original post by doivid)
    I have really no idea why people have to do a conversion course between England and Scotland. After all, the legal systems must be very similar. I've heard that Glasgow offer a course which allows you to practise in either England or Scotland, so if I was a Scottish student looking to avoid tuition fees I'd probably opt for that one.
    They aren't. Scottish law includes elements of Roman civil law, including delictual liability, and does not include any branch of equity. The required courses for law degrees and practise are dramatically different. Scottish criminal law includes a verdict of not proven, jury trials are not always an option, and the jury size is different.

    And Glasgow do not. The only Scottish uni that offers a degree in both English and Scottish law is Dundee.
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    (Original post by doivid)
    I have really no idea why people have to do a conversion course between England and Scotland. After all, the legal systems must be very similar. I've heard that Glasgow offer a course which allows you to practise in either England or Scotland, so if I was a Scottish student looking to avoid tuition fees I'd probably opt for that one.
    Glasgow certainly don't - I know that much! Only Dundee let you do English (or NL law) as well as Scots law. The legal systems are fairly different too from what I gather from my legally minded friends
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    No, there isn't. A year is a short amount of time, and you don't even have to do all the parts of the conversion course if you already have a Scots law degree.

    You will not be ancient: you'll be finished with the academic stage of legal training by 23. You'd be 26 by the time you were fully qualified as a solicitor in Scotland, compared to 24 in England. Go where you'll be happiest. Only a 17 or 18 yo thinks being 23 is ancient. I can seeing concern about funding, but don't worry about the age issue.

    Incidentally, if you might want to practise in Scotland you *must* do a law degree in Scotland. If you have a degree in another subject, or in English law, you can do a 2 year accelerated degree. The only way to become a lawyer in Scotland without doing a degree in Scots law is to transfer after qualifying in England (i.e., after a two year training contract as a solicitor or as a fully paid-up barrister) and taking several tests in Scots law. Moreover, it's easier to transfer from Scots to English as a qualified lawyer than vice versa. (There are fewer tests, and you don't have the additional hurdle of coming to grips with civil law, which isn't usually required in England.)

    I suggest you look at the Dundee dual qualifying programme--Dundee is an excellent law school, and you could do a degree in English and Scots law in four years. Best of both worlds.

    Edinburgh is an excellent law school, North or South of the border. It's currently ranked 11th in the Times. You could do far worse, wherever you want to/end up practising.
    Thank you JJ for all your help, very insightful
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    (Original post by doivid)
    I have really no idea why people have to do a conversion course between England and Scotland. After all, the legal systems must be very similar. I've heard that Glasgow offer a course which allows you to practise in either England or Scotland, so if I was a Scottish student looking to avoid tuition fees I'd probably opt for that one.
    Glasgow don't do this currently... and the legal systems are completely different, with Scotland being closer to the civilian systems of European countries while England subscribes to the Anglo-American common law system. So there are differences - and I think whoever said above about Dundee offering the dual degree is right in that it's the only Scottish uni that does it.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are probably the best unis for law in Scotland, though Strathclyde and Aberdeen deserve honourable mentions - a lot of the firms in Scotland tend to favour graduates from wherever the partners graduated, so there's a bit of bias there. As you're not intending to practice here, internationally, I would think Edinburgh would be rated quite highly.

    (Original post by oxymoronic)
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    Edinburgh yes; as above, Aberdeen not-so-much in the high-regards (low entry requirements make it seem cushier, plus not so much international recognition afaik). Weirdly you quoting me hasn't come up; I just happened to click on this thread!
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    No, there isn't. A year is a short amount of time, and you don't even have to do all the parts of the conversion course if you already have a Scots law degree.

    You will not be ancient: you'll be finished with the academic stage of legal training by 23. You'd be 26 by the time you were fully qualified as a solicitor in Scotland, compared to 24 in England. Go where you'll be happiest. Only a 17 or 18 yo thinks being 23 is ancient. I can seeing concern about funding, but don't worry about the age issue.

    Incidentally, if you might want to practise in Scotland you *must* do a law degree in Scotland. If you have a degree in another subject, or in English law, you can do a 2 year accelerated degree. The only way to become a lawyer in Scotland without doing a degree in Scots law is to transfer after qualifying in England (i.e., after a two year training contract as a solicitor or as a fully paid-up barrister) and taking several tests in Scots law. Moreover, it's easier to transfer from Scots to English as a qualified lawyer than vice versa. (There are fewer tests, and you don't have the additional hurdle of coming to grips with civil law, which isn't usually required in England.)

    I suggest you look at the Dundee dual qualifying programme--Dundee is an excellent law school, and you could do a degree in English and Scots law in four years. Best of both worlds.

    Edinburgh is an excellent law school, North or South of the border. It's currently ranked 11th in the Times. You could do far worse, wherever you want to/end up practising.
    Oh can I ask you one last thing!

    After getting my degree from Edinburgh, if I wanted to do an MA in Law at an English uni, would this be possible? Or would this not because of the difference?
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    (Original post by Yoshua)
    Oh can I ask you one last thing!

    After getting my degree from Edinburgh, if I wanted to do an MA in Law at an English uni, would this be possible? Or would this not because of the difference?
    You should be able to do an LLM (a masters in law) with a degree from any common law country, and for these purposes that includes Scotland. (Indeed, if you were good enough and could afford it you could go to the US for an LLM programme.) Note, however, that an LLM will not entitle you to practise anywhere, and might not contribute much to your CV if practising is what you want to do. If you want to be an academic without practising first, you will almost certainly need an LLM and probably a PhD.

    Postgraduate degrees are only of limited use for practising, with the possible exception of the BCL or a Cambridge/Harvard/Yale LLM--see the threads in the careers forum on the topic. Simon Myerson, a QC in the Northern circuit, offers some great advice and he knows whereof he speaks.

    Finally, do not confuse the MA in Law at Sheffield or Bristol with a typical LLM degree. These degrees are graduate degrees in law, but they are qualifying law degrees for people whose first degree is in a different subject. I briefly considered applying for the programmes, and they look excellent, but they are not for people who already have a degree in law.

    Perhaps you could copy the salient parts of this post and the others to your thread in the law forum, so other people can see the responses and don't waste their time responding?
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    You should be able to do an LLM (a masters in law) with a degree from any common law country, and for these purposes that includes Scotland. (Indeed, if you were good enough and could afford it you could go to the US for an LLM programme.) Note, however, that an LLM will not entitle you to practise anywhere, and might not contribute much to your CV if practising is what you want to do. If you want to be an academic without practising first, you will almost certainly need an LLM and probably a PhD.

    Postgraduate degrees are only of limited use for practising, with the possible exception of the BCL or a Cambridge/Harvard/Yale LLM--see the threads in the careers forum on the topic. Simon Myerson, a QC in the Northern circuit, offers some great advice and he knows whereof he speaks.

    Finally, do not confuse the MA in Law at Sheffield or Bristol with a typical LLM degree. These degrees are graduate degrees in law, but they are qualifying law degrees for people whose first degree is in a different subject. I briefly considered applying for the programmes, and they look excellent, but they are not for people who already have a degree in law.

    Perhaps you could copy the salient parts of this post and the others to your thread in the law forum, so other people can see the responses and don't waste their time responding?
    Yes I will do - thank you!
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    I suggest you look at the Dundee dual qualifying programme--Dundee is an excellent law school, and you could do a degree in English and Scots law in four years. Best of both worlds.
    Is that not damaging since you only learn part of each? You miss modules from each?

    :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Is that not damaging since you only learn part of each? You miss modules from each?

    :dontknow:
    You don't get many optional courses, but you do all of the required courses to practise in each jurisdiction. You miss nothing that is required. Bear in mind that anyone who does the GDL in England only does the required options, and anyone who does the 2 year LLB in Scotland only does the required options. It's not a disadvantage in the legal profession by any stretch of the imagination. The only question is whether you are willing to make the tradeoff.

    The Dundee dual option is the fastest and most straightforward way to fulfil the academic qualifications to practise law in both jurisdictions. Of course you can only practise in one to start with, so if you're sure you want to practise English law but want to study in Scotland, Dundee is your only option. With an English law degree, you'd need another two year LLB(Ord) in Scotland. To practise in Scotland, you must have an honours degree in something, so that's four years for an LLB(Hons) in Scots law, plus a year for the GDL.

    There are so many ways to fulfil the requirements, it really comes down to what suits you best/what you can afford.

    I take your point, though--I didn't want to do the GDL b/c I wanted more time to study, and I preferred Cambridge to Oxford (though the point is academic now) because Cambridge allows 2 year BA students to do law options beyond the required courses for practise.

    Edit: Congrats on the Dundee offers! Best of luck with Ed and Glasgow.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    You don't get many optional courses, but you do all of the required courses to practise in each jurisdiction. You miss nothing that is required. Bear in mind that anyone who does the GDL in England only does the required options, and anyone who does the 2 year LLB in Scotland only does the required options. It's not a disadvantage in the legal profession by any stretch of the imagination. The only question is whether you are willing to make the tradeoff.

    The Dundee dual option is the fastest and most straightforward way to fulfil the academic qualifications to practise law in both jurisdictions. Of course you can only practise in one to start with, so if you're sure you want to practise English law but want to study in Scotland, Dundee is your only option. With an English law degree, you'd need another two year LLB(Ord) in Scotland. To practise in Scotland, you must have an honours degree in something, so that's four years for an LLB(Hons) in Scots law, plus a year for the GDL.

    There are so many ways to fulfil the requirements, it really comes down to what suits you best/what you can afford.

    I take your point, though--I didn't want to do the GDL b/c I wanted more time to study, and I preferred Cambridge to Oxford (though the point is academic now) because Cambridge allows 2 year BA students to do law options beyond the required courses for practise.

    Edit: Congrats on the Dundee offers! Best of luck with Ed and Glasgow.
    Thanks.

    You too.

    I was just worried since I was unsure which to pick, the English law course or the Scottish law course for my "firm", or if I made a mistake by not picking the joint honours course where I could have the best of both worlds.

    What is this about doing other modules (scottish universities) other subjects?

    You have to do other modules with Law? (Philosophy/Politics) Does this happen in Dundee?
 
 
 
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