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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    Thanks.

    You too.

    I was just worried since I was unsure which to pick, the English law course or the Scottish law course for my "firm", or if I made a mistake by not picking the joint honours course where I could have the best of both worlds.

    What is this about doing other modules (scottish universities) other subjects?

    You have to do other modules with Law? (Philosophy/Politics) Does this happen in Dundee?
    Cheers!

    You don't have to do non-law courses as part of a Scots law degree--in fact, it's difficult to do so. Your first two years are very regimented, and after that you are doing honours law courses. I meant law options--courses in law, but on a different or specialised area of the law or of legal theory. (For example, at Cambridge I'll do equity, contract, criminal, constitutional and public, tort, european union, land, and three options. Examples include medical law, family law, international human rights, conflict of law, jurisprudence, and so forth. At Oxford, I would have criminal, constitutional, contract, tort, EU, land, and land, and no others--the same would be true for the GDL.)
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Cheers!

    You don't have to do non-law courses as part of a Scots law degree--in fact, it's difficult to do so. Your first two years are very regimented, and after that you are doing honours law courses. I meant law options--courses in law, but on a different or specialised area of the law or of legal theory. (For example, at Cambridge I'll do equity, contract, criminal, constitutional and public, tort, european union, land, and three options. Examples include medical law, family law, international human rights, conflict of law, jurisprudence, and so forth. At Oxford, I would have criminal, constitutional, contract, tort, EU, land, and land, and no others--the same would be true for the GDL.)
    I see, I see. :p:

    I have an equal passion for Philosophy as I do for Law. So I regret having chosen "English Law" as a choice and wondered whether I should have picked a joint honours of Scottish Law with Philosophy...

    My last question (:o:) being is this worth it? Would it affect/hurt my future as a Scottish Lawyer/Solicitor if I did a joint honours with Philosophy?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    I see, I see. :p:

    I have an equal passion for Philosophy as I do for Law. So I regret having chosen "English Law" as a choice and wondered whether I should have picked a joint honours of Scottish Law with Philosophy...

    My last question (:o:) being is this worth it? Would it affect/hurt my future as a Scottish Lawyer/Solicitor if I did a joint honours with Philosophy?

    Thanks.
    I don't think it would, but you need to make sure you fulfil all the requirements for the bar association. You have to be sure you do a qualifying law degree, which might in practice limit the number of philosophy courses you can do. Incidentally, you can take law options with a more philosophical bent--e.g. jurisprudence (which Edinburgh requires in 2nd year) and legal theory. You might be able to pick up philosophy as an outside option in first year to see how you like studying it at uni.
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    Does anyone known the legal conversions to the US if studying law at Ed.?
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    I'm at Edinburgh law school and it was ranked the best in Scotland/3rd in the Uk recently (I think, they announced it in a lecture)

    Regarding Scots law v English law, doing a Scots law deg, then moving to England is much much easier than vice versa, and Scots law also makes working in mainland Europe easier, as we have mostly the same legal principles due to the Roman law influences.

    There is much thinking in Europe at the moment that the Legal systems of the EU will gradually look like that of Scotland, due to the pluristic nature of Scots law (it mixes both civil and common law, like the ECJ does)

    Best of luck!

    About America, I can remember a lecturer saying something like its easier to transfer to America after a 4 year Scots LLB than an e English 3 year llb, as its to do with years spent studying I think.
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    (Original post by queenvalentina)
    Does anyone known the legal conversions to the US if studying law at Ed.?
    You'll need to do the JD, to be honest. You might be able to sit the bar exam in New York or California, but you'll have tremendous difficulty finding a firm that will hire you without a law degree from an American law school. If you want to study Scots law, great, but it won't necessarily be an advantage over any other subject for doing the JD.

    I see you have an American flag icon. Perhaps this is not a problem for you, but if you aren't a citizen or don't have a green card, DO NOT underestimate the difficulty of getting a visa to work in the US. A lot of people think it's dead easy; it isn't.
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    (Original post by DoyleJr)
    I'm at Edinburgh law school and it was ranked the best in Scotland/3rd in the Uk recently (I think, they announced it in a lecture)

    Regarding Scots law v English law, doing a Scots law deg, then moving to England is much much easier than vice versa, and Scots law also makes working in mainland Europe easier, as we have mostly the same legal principles due to the Roman law influences.

    There is much thinking in Europe at the moment that the Legal systems of the EU will gradually look like that of Scotland, due to the pluristic nature of Scots law (it mixes both civil and common law, like the ECJ does)

    Best of luck!

    About America, I can remember a lecturer saying something like its easier to transfer to America after a 4 year Scots LLB than an e English 3 year llb, as its to do with years spent studying I think.
    Who ranked it third in the UK? The history department proclaimed themselves third, but no one really paid attention as it was based on our own interpretation of statistics. The Times recently ranked it 11th, so I'm just curious who put it so much higher (over, presumably, UCL, Durham, LSE and Kings, all of which are superb law schools).
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    Yes, I am american and I will most likely change the course but either way, I plan to go on to grad school in the us and do law. Thanks for the advice
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    (Original post by queenvalentina)
    Yes, I am american and I will most likely change the course but either way, I plan to go on to grad school in the us and do law. Thanks for the advice
    No problem, just wanted to clarify your intentions and background.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Who ranked it third in the UK? The history department proclaimed themselves third, but no one really paid attention as it was based on our own interpretation of statistics. The Times recently ranked it 11th, so I'm just curious who put it so much higher (over, presumably, UCL, Durham, LSE and Kings, all of which are superb law schools).
    It was the Guardian - they ranked it fourth for 2010 however not third (for Law that is) after Cambridge, Oxford and UCL.
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    Must've been 4th I meant then, or I'm talking about 2009. Sorry!
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    Guardian 2010: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...sity-guide-law
    Law:

    1 Cambridge 100
    2 Oxford 91.2
    3 UCL 89.5
    4 Edinburgh 88.1
    5 King's College London 87.6
    6 London School of Economics 86.6

    The Times Good University Guide 2010: http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...=15&y=2&sub=38
    Law:

    1 Cambridge 100
    2 Oxford 98.7
    3 London School of Economics 94.5
    4 Nottingham 92.4
    5 University College London 92.3
    6 King's College London 90.7
    7 Birmingham 89.6
    8 Aberdeen 88.8
    9 Queen Mary, London 88.3
    10 Durham 88.2
    11 Edinburgh 88
    12 Bristol 87.8

    The Independent Complete University Guide 2010: http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...e.htm?ipg=8727
    Law:

    1 University College London 100.0
    2 Oxford 99.7
    3 Cambridge 98.5
    4 London School of Economics 97.1
    5 Nottingham 94.6
    6 Glasgow 93.8
    7 Durham 93.7
    8 King's College London 93.5
    9 Bristol 93.2
    10 Edinburgh 93.1
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    league table positions mean chuff all.

    what matters is what you make of it. any top 20 uni will get your foot in the door, and once you're in there its all about you!

    Edinburgh law school is great. good community (creaky library, which irritates me ) strong tradition, brilliant lecturers and possibly the best city in the uk to be a student in (depending on your interests of course)

    the uk supreme court has judges from 3 universities, and just like the 3 universities that have produced prime ministers, its oxford cambridge and edinburgh.

    EDIT. Re philosophy. I STRONGLY ADVISE ANYONE WHO DOES LAW TO TAKE ANTHROPOLOGY OR PHILOSOPHY. it will hugely improve your grades. the level of analysis in these subjects, and the very particular way of thinking they engender (both are vocations, once you learn to think in an anthropological or philosophical way you never think the same again) will help you massively in law. i know this from huge grade disparities between my anth marks and law marks.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    You'll need to do the JD, to be honest. You might be able to sit the bar exam in New York or California, but you'll have tremendous difficulty finding a firm that will hire you without a law degree from an American law school. If you want to study Scots law, great, but it won't necessarily be an advantage over any other subject for doing the JD.

    I see you have an American flag icon. Perhaps this is not a problem for you, but if you aren't a citizen or don't have a green card, DO NOT underestimate the difficulty of getting a visa to work in the US. A lot of people think it's dead easy; it isn't.
    My lawyer with whom I'm working with right now got a degree from Wales, and he practises in Virginia. There are several states that don't require a degree to take the bar. Besides that, if a company wants an internationally-aware lawyer (which the firm I'm using right now DOESN'T, he just got it because they liked him-- he's doing quite well- with no American degree) your credentials from a British school could be appealing over someone who went to an average, typical American school.
    You could work for international companies- worse-case scenario. Also, it's 10x easier to an American work visa than a British or ESPECIALLY continental Europe country (Austria, Germany, etc.). The companies here only have to do the following:
    "Most temporary worker categories require that the applicant's prospective employer or agent to file a petition which must be approved by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) before you can apply for a visa."

    As opposed to Austria/Germany where the company needs to make an argument for why they need YOU as opposed to another person in country. It's hard to make that argument for any profession. It's easiest, if you are to work abroad, to work with an American company that's based overseas. There are plenty of those, and it's easier for them to make that argument than a domestic company.

    Anyways, I'm planning on getting a Scottish degree in law and if I want to come home I can sit the bar.


    Here's a list someone made:


    "As far as I am aware, seven states in the U.S. allow reading for the law without law school as follows (Source):

    California;

    Maine;

    New York;

    Vermont;

    Virginia;

    Washington;

    Wyoming.

    Although this article focuses of California, a few of the above states have basic educational requirements prior to admission into the Bar. In California, this is known as the Law Office Study Program.

    California:

    "Applicants who obtain legal education by . . . law office study must have four years of law study and take an examination after their firstyear. Applicants who pass the examination within three consecutive administrations of first becoming eligible to take it will receive credit for all law study completed to the date of the examination passed."

    Maine:

    "Applicants may have . . . completed 2/3 of graduationrequirements from an ABA-accredited law school and within 12 months after successful completion pursued the study of law in the law office of an attorney in active practice of law in Maine on a full-time basis for at least one year . . . ."

    New York:

    "Law office study permitted after successful completion of one year at an ABA-approved law school."(See also)


    Vermont:

    "Four-year law office study program; must have completed three-fourths of work accepted for a bachelor's degree in a college approved by the Court before commencing the study of law"

    Wyoming:

    "Law office study permitted as a structured course comparable to 2 years at an ABA-approved law school Prior approval of independent study required."

    No special requirements are needed to become an attorney without law school in Virginia or Washington as far as I could determine.

    All of the above information came from the "Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admission Requirements 2004," published by the National Conference of Bar Examiners and American Bar Association Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar"




    Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Which_stat...#ixzz1Et2SkMuN
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    anyone know what the usual academic requirements for law are? their website doesnt say anything.
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    (Original post by cheesesticks)
    anyone know what the usual academic requirements for law are? their website doesnt say anything.
    As in the entrance requirements?

    They are AABB for Higher, and AAA for A-Level.
 
 
 
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