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    Having read Nat Sci at Catz, I do agree it is a nice university. The social life is great (but then I guess that is so for many universities) and the one trump card it has that just is unbeatable is the reputation - you never ever have to explain that it is really a good university - honest!

    But for many subjects it is not the best. Vet Medicine is one of them - http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...ub=61&x=21&y=5

    Architecture is another - http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...sub=7&x=27&y=4

    You can search for others yourself.

    It's a nice place and I would have been pleased and proud if my daughter had got there for History. But she has an achievable AAA offer from York that she is happy with, and an AAB from Southampton as insurance. She has her choice, I'm happy with whatever she chooses and proud of what she has achieved and the mature way she is handling the UCAS process.

    Cambridge isn't so great that it is worth risking too much just to get there - as a previous poster said, it is not the be all and end all - there is more to life than a place at Cambridge.
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    (Original post by bb193)
    Having read Nat Sci at Catz, I do agree it is a nice university. The social life is great (but then I guess that is so for many universities) and the one trump card it has that just is unbeatable is the reputation - you never ever have to explain that it is really a good university - honest!

    But for many subjects it is not the best. Vet Medicine is one of them - http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...ub=61&x=21&y=5

    Architecture is another - http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...sub=7&x=27&y=4

    You can search for others yourself.

    It's a nice place and I would have been pleased and proud if my daughter had got there for History. But she has an achievable AAA offer from York that she is happy with, and an AAB from Southampton as insurance. She has her choice, I'm happy with whatever she chooses and proud of what she has achieved and the mature way she is handling the UCAS process.

    Cambridge isn't so great that it is worth risking too much just to get there - as a previous poster said, it is not the be all and end all - there is more to life than a place at Cambridge.
    I definately agree that its is not the best place for Architecture, many have said its small, underfunded and at one point a few years ago it was going to be shut down.

    However, I want a place at a top university. Bath is ranked #1 for Architecture and I know I may be a fool to turn down that place if I get it. I would also be a fool that if I don't get the place I want to settle for something I may later regret taking.

    A year in a lifetime is not that long and you here of wonderful things people have been able to do on a gap year and have matured to a point where they are more comfortable going to university. It sounds like just an excuse but I dont feel ready for uni yet, I don't want to leave my parents. This may turn out to be a blessing in disguise in the long run.
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    (Original post by Laurie161)
    Yeh I agree, If you take a gap year and reapply you are a much stronger student and will almost definitely get a place somewhere. Unless you just lounge around for year!
    I posted this elsewhere, and remembered it was relevant to this thread too. Hope it helps.

    I'm not sure if this means what it seems to mean, but I did find this - http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/reporter/.../table10_1.pdf

    It seems to break down applicants into 'pre A level', 'post A level' and 'non A level'.

    Pre A level applicants totalled 9,991, with 7,106 being rejected - a rejection rate of 71.1%

    Post A level applicants totalled 905, with 658 being rejected - a rejection rate of 72.7%

    So, assuming I'm reading this right, it seems to contradict the idea that applications are stronger after getting A level results. The chances of rejection are slightly higher after taking A levels than before.

    Not the answer I expected or wanted, but I thought people considering reapplication might want to know.
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    (Original post by bb193)
    I posted this elsewhere, and remembered it was relevant to this thread too. Hope it helps.
    Thanks for the information. However, I would say that the numbers can be very misleading and those I have talked to in Cambridge have said ignore them as they are drastically variable. There are so many things to consider. What subjects were the post A-level applicants for? There is significant difference in the distribustion of post A-level applicants in various subjects. What were there grades? What age were they? Were they reapplicants? If they were, what was there original feedback and had they actually improved? The questions are never ending.

    I have to admit I looked at numbers when applying as I thought I might as well look at anything that could give me an edge as Architecture is the most competitive course. In the end though I ignored them and chose a college that had previously taken in 0 Architecture students in the previous years. Statistics make little difference as they have an excellent system to make sure of that and it's all down to strength of the applicant. I didn't get in because I wasn't ready, not because of numbers.

    Has your daughter decided what to do yet? In the end I made a decision 10 minutes before the deadline to firm my Bath offer and decided later what to do as advised by the uni. I am in a horrible predicament. My exams went badly despite being prepared and now I'm not even sure if I will meet my Bath offer, let alone have enough to reapply. If I do decide to reapply, I will throw away an easy offer from the #1 uni for my subject which had 30 applicants per place. Finally, I still love Cambridge and get upset when I think about it

    Sorry for the length, it's been a while since I've been able to talk about it :rolleyes:
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    If you're thinking of reapplying to Oxbridge I would suggest you take up your insurance offer and a complete a year at that university and have the certificate to show for it. While you're there you can sill continue the application to Oxbridge.

    I know of a person who got rejected by Oxford, accepted his insurance choice Nottingham, attended the first year and achieved a 1st. During this time he reapplied to Oxford and gained a place. He walked into Oxford the same year he gained a 1st at another uni.

    In fact, I'm sure you could even switch courses to spend your first year sampling another area of interest. For example, if you're planning on reapplying to Oxbridge you could treat your year at your insurance uni as a "gap year" or "sample year" or "exploring interests year" and switch from, say, Law to Japanese - while still reapplying for Law at Oxbridge.

    You could still travel in the 4 week breaks between terms.

    AND, if things don't work out with Oxbridge again, you can easily resume your studies at your insurance uni.

    I'd definitely recommend this path to anyone thinking of reapplying, you get an amazing experience and more great stuff to put on your CV.
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    (Original post by Athena)
    Pretty expensive gap year (you'd be looking at, ooh, £3225 in fees plus living expenses - say £4000? You could have a bloody amazing gap year for that much).
    The fees are covered by Student Loans - that money is loaned to you; it's credit - and students don't usually have £4000 in cash to spend on a gap year. I would say it already qualifies as a "bloody amazing gap year": amazing experience at uni + fresher, make many new friends, ability to travel during term breaks, sample course and gain accreditation for doing so.
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    (Original post by Athena)
    Thank you, I already have a degree and know well enough how the student loans set up works :rolleyes:
    Then it was silly of you to comment on the money you receive as a loan to attend uni as finance for a gap year.

    There are massive cons - commit yourself to a course you may not enjoy (heck, you're reapplying to other universities while you do it, so you can't be very committed to that course, at that university);
    Nonsense; "may not enjoy" - obviously, that's the point of sampling/exploring interests, how else would you ever come to that conclusion? It doesn't make you any less committed, you can choose to fully commit to exploring that course for a year before moving on.

    you may not get into anywhere "better" while re-applying;
    Right, in which case you continue at your current uni/course or switch to a different course - which in reality, is quite easy to do at many unis.

    while Oxbridge do allow SOME people to reapply while already studying, they don't ALWAYS allow it, nor do they (admissions tutors) like it;
    Did you just pull this out of your ass? These "cons" of yours are just possibilities, e.g.: sometimes A occurs, but it does not always occur - DUH.

    you might get that offer, finish your first year and realise you don't want to leave;
    Eh? How is this a con/disadvantage?

    it's not as though you can import your credits/modules/blah from that first year into your Oxbridge first year;
    Right - so what? It's a "gap year", remember?

    you'll leave a whole lot of new friends behind;
    Don't be silly. You don't need to "leave" anyone behind if you choose not to. The world is a global place, you can keep in touch with anyone form anywhere if you choose to - see TSR for an example.

    using up a year of precious student loan funding which you might need for, say, a five year course (medicine, dentistry, some of the double language degrees such as Chinese and Japanese, or Classics with a European language), or the start of graduate entry medicine...
    This is a valid point. Last time I checked, Student Loans will cover 4 years of a standard undergraduate degree. So you can, for example, spend 1 year at uni A and a further 3 years and uni B and you'll still be eligible to receive funding for a standard 3 year BA/BSc.

    Side note: form your points, it seems you don't have much experience of life... living in a cocoon much? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by synvilla)
    In some ways I feel that I am good enough for Cambridge: I am intelligent and I work hard, and I can deal with a heavy workload...

    People in my surrounding thinks that I would be perfect for Cambridge, as I combine the whole being intelligent&hardworking with being an absolute nerd for the social sciences. If I would however reapply, I don't know what to improve and if I should apply for the same course or another.. :dontknow:

    Edit: Advice appreciated.
    This was a piece of rather astounding fact told to me by one of my friends who did interview board stuff. Of the six applicants applying to a cambridge college for one place (medicine), four of them would have all have had the potential to do really well in the university. Unfortunately three of them get rejected.

    So what happens? A few reapply and of that lot some get in. Most move on. What happens afterwards? They go on to their secondary choices and into university. Now someone must've told you by now that, if Cambridge fails, you'd still excel in whatever university you go to. Not only that, but all those who also didn't get into Oxbridge will still be kicking around and hopefully molding the fabric of the universities which they attend.

    So the moral of the story? From what you say about yourself you have the academic prowress and enthusiasm, but don't lock both away in a box and throw the keys behind some old Cambridge college for you to forever try and retrieve. Use it an enliven a completely new, and potentially better, environment. You never know, you might enjoy it more
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    (Original post by PKA)
    This was a piece of rather astounding fact told to me by one of my friends who did interview board stuff. Of the six applicants applying to a cambridge college for one place (medicine), four of them would have all have had the potential to do really well in the university. Unfortunately three of them get rejected.

    So what happens? A few reapply and of that lot some get in. Most move on. What happens afterwards? They go on to their secondary choices and into university. Now someone must've told you by now that, if Cambridge fails, you'd still excel in whatever university you go to. Not only that, but all those who also didn't get into Oxbridge will still be kicking around and hopefully molding the fabric of the universities which they attend.

    So the moral of the story? From what you say about yourself you have the academic prowress and enthusiasm, but don't lock both away in a box and throw the keys behind some old Cambridge college for you to forever try and retrieve. Use it an enliven a completely new, and potentially better, environment. You never know, you might enjoy it more

    I so agree with you. I had applied to cambridge in 2009 and was rejected from the pool. But that didn't stop me from continuing to try hard. Being interviewed and even considered by cambridge means that you have the potential to do well wherever you go. I have certainly proved that true.
    I just got my IB results and have attained full marks (top 0.2% of the world). Now I'm off to study at Imperial College, which in my opinion, is probably better for sciences. Who knows what I can become in the future. Cambridge really isn't the only good university out there. So my advice to everyone is, to not give up. Prove to cambridge what you can do.
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    (Original post by popman)
    If you're thinking of reapplying to Oxbridge I would suggest you take up your insurance offer and a complete a year at that university and have the certificate to show for it. While you're there you can sill continue the application to Oxbridge.

    I know of a person who got rejected by Oxford, accepted his insurance choice Nottingham, attended the first year and achieved a 1st. During this time he reapplied to Oxford and gained a place. He walked into Oxford the same year he gained a 1st at another uni.

    In fact, I'm sure you could even switch courses to spend your first year sampling another area of interest. For example, if you're planning on reapplying to Oxbridge you could treat your year at your insurance uni as a "gap year" or "sample year" or "exploring interests year" and switch from, say, Law to Japanese - while still reapplying for Law at Oxbridge.

    You could still travel in the 4 week breaks between terms.

    AND, if things don't work out with Oxbridge again, you can easily resume your studies at your insurance uni.

    I'd definitely recommend this path to anyone thinking of reapplying, you get an amazing experience and more great stuff to put on your CV.
    That's amazing! Good effort!!

    I failed to get the grades needed for my offer many years ago, but I simply took it on the chin, went to Cardiff, graduated with a First and am now heading to Cambridge to do a Masters. Maybe I should have applied after only my first year at undergrad though.... :rolleyes:

    I have to say that it was one of the most devastating experiences of my life though. And I don't think my parents were too happy with me either, which didn't help. Still, whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger, or something like that.....
 
 
 
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