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    So, what exactly can someone do with a Biology degree? Not just the standard Bio degree, but Bioengineering, Biochem, etc...

    Is it all just lab work?

    Is there any future at all for these courses?

    Or does everyone who gets these degrees end up doing something completely unrelated or go into teaching?
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    the world is your oyster :p:

    these no law that sounds you have to do lab work after, you can if you want to, you could go into research, study some more get your masters and Ph.D., teaching or something unrelated, your sort of answering your own question
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    (Original post by robinson999)
    the world is your oyster :p:

    these no law that sounds you have to do lab work after, you can if you want to, you could go into research, study some more get your masters and Ph.D., teaching or something unrelated, your sort of answering your own question
    Haha, if only I could answer all of my life questions myself :P

    But is it true that jobs for Biology are scarce or is this just a myth?
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    Learn how to mate the right way.
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    1) You can become a scientist, which is absolutely fantastic if you like the work, but it's long hours, crappy pay, and very insecure career planning.
    2) In companies, it's normal hours and better pay, but soulless work.
    3) Or you can become a teacher - this is great, if you like teaching.
    4) I suppose there are also general graduate schemes where they don't care about degree choice at all.
    For 1) and 2) you will have to do a PhD if you want to get anywhere.

    Unless you really love biology and really want to do research or become a science teacher, I would not recommend that you study Biology - at least study Natural Sciences or Physical sciences (if you also like those) - the numeracy of those subjects gives you more options later.
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    (Original post by Darcy23)
    Haha, if only I could answer all of my life questions myself :P

    But is it true that jobs for Biology are scarce or is this just a myth?
    what you mean scarce, jobs in that field or job for people with that degree, i think most job are pretty scarce at this current time :p:
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    If you go to a top 10 uni for it then you will have similar options to everyone else. Nowadays for graduate schemes its all just about a 2:1 in whatever subject and showing you have the competencies/skillset required on your app and in your interview. If you want to a career in something biology related then pay is likely to be poor unless you go into pharmaceuticals. You might wanna consider biology with a year in industry, I think York offers it and others will too.
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    It is always important to like what you are studying or to know what job you want to have in the future.

    I made a PhD in Biology, namely Neurobiology. It took 4 years of hard working in a lab. In the end I felt my self like a mouse and the lab is a big cage, because I was running the whole day from the cell culture room to the operation room, to my office, to the microscope, to the bench to make some immunostaining...

    I knew from the beginnig that research isn't really what I like but I needed the doctoral degree to teach at university. Teaching is my dream.
    Anyway while you are doing your master you will have to spend 6 months in a lab for a practical. Then you may know whether you will like this job or not. You can also switch to a company, maybe work as a technician or in a laboratory for medical analysis. I have worked in a bacteriology laboratory at hospital once.

    Good luck
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    Lab-wise there's quite a bit of variety in what you can do. Clinical science is concentrated on applied biology and using it in medicine, and is a lot different to Research science, which obviously does most of the nitty gritty things people associate with science. Both have pros and cons.

    Clinical scientists get to work in the border between science and medicine, and get more regular hours, but it can be a bit monotonous after a while because most the patients who come in will have similar problems (the more interesting conditions are always the rare ones sadly). They get to do some research, but it's not quite so extensive as research scientists. Another con if clinical scientists need to deal with Doctors thinking they know everything, when really they know very little about the details of the science. Clinical scientists are generally employed by the NHS and it's a pretty small working group (Only ~4000 clinical scientists in the NHS, of dozens of different specialities), so very good job security too.

    Research scientists are well known for being run into the ground with loads of unpaid overtime to get work done, but they do get to work on the 'frontiers' of science and learn all the new stuff. Again, it can get monotonous over time, but so does pretty much every science/job.

    The good thing about biology is if you get bored with your own field, it's possible to switch to another field. Quite a few scientists start off in one field and by the end of their career end up in a very different field. That possible flexibility or the choice to spend a lifetime concentrating on one field is pretty useful for people who feel like a change.
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    (Original post by alijimi)
    It is always important to like what you are studying or to know what job you want to have in the future.

    I made a PhD in Biology, namely Neurobiology. It took 4 years of hard working in a lab. In the end I felt my self like a mouse and the lab is a big cage, because I was running the whole day from the cell culture room to the operation room, to my office, to the microscope, to the bench to make some immunostaining...

    I knew from the beginnig that research isn't really what I like but I needed the doctoral degree to teach at university. Teaching is my dream.
    Anyway while you are doing your master you will have to spend 6 months in a lab for a practical. Then you may know whether you will like this job or not. You can also switch to a company, maybe work as a technician or in a laboratory for medical analysis. I have worked in a bacteriology laboratory at hospital once.

    Good luck
    Thanks for the insight.


    I'm actually applying for Pharmacy right now but internally I sometimes flirt with the idea of becoming a Biology teacher.

    In a way I think Pharmacy is very flexible, and like the poster above stated, people in science seem to change field often, so that's why I'm going for this. But, like I said, a little part of my brain tells me I might have more fun teaching Biology.
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    (Original post by Darcy23)
    Thanks for the insight.


    I'm actually applying for Pharmacy right now but internally I sometimes flirt with the idea of becoming a Biology teacher.

    In a way I think Pharmacy is very flexible, and like the poster above stated, people in science seem to change field often, so that's why I'm going for this. But, like I said, a little part of my brain tells me I might have more fun teaching Biology.
    If you decide you want to teach, couldn't you just do a PGCE after?
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    (Original post by Favourite Worst Nightmare)
    If you decide you want to teach, couldn't you just do a PGCE after?
    I HAVE thought about that actually

    I'm not 100% sure if I can be elligable (sp?)for it though
 
 
 
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