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    OMG IM SO COMPLETELY PANICING ABOUT MY PSYCHOLOGY EXAM ON THE 29TH!

    I'm so confused and have got myself in such a muddle about what A02 is and my teacher is so rubbish he will not help.

    So, could someone maybe explain this for me.. nice and simply.
    IM SO SCARED!
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    Don't panic
    I'm doing the same exam as you I think AQA?
    Basically, I think this is right, the information you have about the subject is split into 3 areas:

    A01 = The outline of the information, i.e, the basic ideas creating the theory
    A02 = The evaluation of the information, i.e, studies etc
    A03 (or synopticity) = Your criticisms of the information, i.e, faults the studies have

    So basically when you get a question such as "Outline and Evaluate theories of 'x'" the outline part is mainly for your A01 points, the evaluate part for your A02 marks and you need to work your A03 points in there yourself
    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by scottiex)
    Don't panic
    I'm doing the same exam as you I think AQA?
    Basically, I think this is right, the information you have about the subject is split into 3 areas:

    A01 = The outline of the information, i.e, the basic ideas creating the theory
    A02 = The evaluation of the information, i.e, studies etc
    A03 (or synopticity) = Your criticisms of the information, i.e, faults the studies have

    So basically when you get a question such as "Outline and Evaluate theories of 'x'" the outline part is mainly for your A01 points, the evaluate part for your A02 marks and you need to work your A03 points in there yourself
    Hope this helps

    Okay so is it just basically saying if it is supported.. what the problems are such as individual differences and cultural differences.. is that for A02?
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    (Original post by Aleexx04)
    Okay so is it just basically saying if it is supported.. what the problems are such as individual differences and cultural differences.. is that for A02?
    The problems of the studies, like you said things like ID and things like small smaple size are things for A03 because they're criticisms. You need to remember that criticisms are also POSITIVE things as well as negative too, btw .
    And A02 is saying if certain studies support the theory, yes.
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    (Original post by Aleexx04)
    Okay so is it just basically saying if it is supported.. what the problems are such as individual differences and cultural differences.. is that for A02?
    AO2:


    Use of other studies: Using studies that either support the theory/concept or highlight a weak spot in it.

    Ecological Validity

    to possess ecological validity, the methods, materials and setting of the study must approximate the real-life situation that is under investigation

    Historical Validity

    is study a child of our time? (is it only relevant to a certain time period)

    Culteral differences
    was the studies sample reliant on people from a particular culture/country? if so this would make it invalid to generalise it to the population of the world as the behaviour observed could have been a result of a cultures traits?

    Gender Bias
    was the study to reliant on one particular gender ie in a study to find out whether people get aggressive, the conclusion using a sample of only women wont be able to be generalised as men may react differently

    Role of Animals
    -If there were animals used in the study, how much harm were they out under and how unfair was this. I believe the British psyhcological Foundation have guidelines in place that animals may only be used if the benefits of the study are of significant use to human beings.
    -also, to what degree can the findings on experiments be generalised to humans, ie Menaker et al (1978) Lesioned (damaged) the supra-chiasmatic nucleus in hamsters and their sleep wake cycle was disrupted as a result. However, how far can this study be generalised to humans who have a more developed brain then hamsters and may not have suffered the same consequences as a hamster

    Ethical Harm
    -were the participants given the option to withdraw
    -was the experiment done with the participants consent
    -was the participant decieved as to the true nature of the study and if so were they debriefed proficiently afterwards, what long term damage could the study have left ie low self esteem
    -did the study cause physical or mental harm
    -was the participants over 16

    AO3: You need to include an example of each to get good marks:

    Reductionism, the behaviour.disorder explained in terms only of a particular perspective/appraoch (ie bioligical, humanist, Psycho-Dynamic, behavioural, cognitive)

    Freewill V Determinism, does the study, concept or theory mean that Humans have no freewill over their behviour, ie we fancy not who we want but those who are of a similar level of social desirability (Matching Hypothesis, Formation of Relationships. Welster et al 1966)

    Nature v Nurture: Are we born with certain behaviours (biological approach?) or is how we act a result of the enviroment (Behavioural Approach?)

    Psychology as a Science: does the theory harm psychologies credibillity as a science?

    -scientific theory must be objective (obseravbly measurable like counting the number of people with parkinsons disease who also have REM Behavioural Disorder) as opposed to subjective (open to interpretation like many supporting studies of the Psycho-Dynamic Theory, ie interpreting dreams.)

    -A scientific study/ experiment must be able to be predicted, observed/measured, and finally either proved or dissproved EDIT: also it must be able to be replicated.

    -Theories and their studies based on the Biological approach or the Cogntive Approach are based on scientific methodology where as The Psycho-Dynamic Theory is not as it cannot be proved or dissproved and as such weakens Psychologies credibility as a science.

    Implications

    -While not on the Syllabus, I have been told that including possible implications of a study/theory (ie the use of melatonin to prevent jetlag) can gain you a few marks.

    I hope this all helps, it may be abit confusing but fi this is the case just private message me and i will probably be of a great deal more assistance, also asked me any othe renquiries you may have on the topics of Bio Rhythms, Eating Behaviours and relationships and i will be glad to help
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    strengths, weaknesses and evidence
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    It's O2. :daydreaming:

    ...with an A.
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    What examboard are you with?
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    (Original post by mel0n)
    What examboard are you with?
    AQA
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    (Original post by az1992)
    AO2:


    Use of other studies: Using studies that either support the theory/concept or highlight a weak spot in it.

    Ecological Validity

    to possess ecological validity, the methods, materials and setting of the study must approximate the real-life situation that is under investigation

    Historical Validity

    is study a child of our time? (is it only relevant to a certain time period)

    Culteral differences
    was the studies sample reliant on people from a particular culture/country? if so this would make it invalid to generalise it to the population of the world as the behaviour observed could have been a result of a cultures traits?

    Gender Bias
    was the study to reliant on one particular gender ie in a study to find out whether people get aggressive, the conclusion using a sample of only women wont be able to be generalised as men may react differently

    Role of Animals
    -If there were animals used in the study, how much harm were they out under and how unfair was this. I believe the British psyhcological Foundation have guidelines in place that animals may only be used if the benefits of the study are of significant use to human beings.
    -also, to what degree can the findings on experiments be generalised to humans, ie Menaker et al (1978) Lesioned (damaged) the supra-chiasmatic nucleus in hamsters and their sleep wake cycle was disrupted as a result. However, how far can this study be generalised to humans who have a more developed brain then hamsters and may not have suffered the same consequences as a hamster

    Ethical Harm
    -were the participants given the option to withdraw
    -was the experiment done with the participants consent
    -was the participant decieved as to the true nature of the study and if so were they debriefed proficiently afterwards, what long term damage could the study have left ie low self esteem
    -did the study cause physical or mental harm
    -was the participants over 16

    AO3: You need to include an example of each to get good marks:

    Reductionism, the behaviour.disorder explained in terms only of a particular perspective/appraoch (ie bioligical, humanist, Psycho-Dynamic, behavioural, cognitive)

    Freewill V Determinism, does the study, concept or theory mean that Humans have no freewill over their behviour, ie we fancy not who we want but those who are of a similar level of social desirability (Matching Hypothesis, Formation of Relationships. Welster et al 1966)

    Nature v Nurture: Are we born with certain behaviours (biological approach?) or is how we act a result of the enviroment (Behavioural Approach?)

    Psychology as a Science: does the theory harm psychologies credibillity as a science?

    -scientific theory must be objective (obseravbly measurable like counting the number of people with parkinsons disease who also have REM Behavioural Disorder) as opposed to subjective (open to interpretation like many supporting studies of the Psycho-Dynamic Theory, ie interpreting dreams.)

    -A scientific study/ experiment must be able to be predicted, observed/measured, and finally either proved or dissproved EDIT: also it must be able to be replicated.

    -Theories and their studies based on the Biological approach or the Cogntive Approach are based on scientific methodology where as The Psycho-Dynamic Theory is not as it cannot be proved or dissproved and as such weakens Psychologies credibility as a science.

    Implications

    -While not on the Syllabus, I have been told that including possible implications of a study/theory (ie the use of melatonin to prevent jetlag) can gain you a few marks.

    I hope this all helps, it may be abit confusing but fi this is the case just private message me and i will probably be of a great deal more assistance, also asked me any othe renquiries you may have on the topics of Bio Rhythms, Eating Behaviours and relationships and i will be glad to help
    I love you for posting that! :woo:
 
 
 
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